Biological Sciences

Chair: Beth F. Mitchell
Professor(s): Beth F. Mitchell, Lawrence H. Tanner
Associate Professor(s): Lara DeRuisseau, Devon B. Keeney, Beth B. Pritts, Sherilyn G.F. Smith, Patrick Yurco
Assistant Professor(s): Emily D. Ledgerwood, Hilary A. McManus
Professor Emeritus: Garritt J. Lugthart Jr., Andrew Szebenyi, S.J.
Professor(s) of Practice: Chad A. Corcoran
Visiting Assistant Professor(s): Edward Michalenko, Blair Page, Kristen Roosa, Evelyn Voura
Adjunct(s): Sheena Britton, Veronica Budelmann, Suzanne De Tore, Gary Hoole, Molly Letsch, Donald McCrimmon, Mariane McLaughlin, Teresa Powrozek, Wendy Scherer, Farhana Syed
Lab Coordinator(s): Georgene Carson, Joseph Perrotta


The Department of Biological Sciences offers B.A. and B.S. degree programs in biological sciences and B.S. degrees in environmental science systems and environmental studies. Students interested in graduate study in biology; in medical, dental or veterinary training; or in forensics should choose one of the B.S. programs in biological sciences with two or more years of chemistry. Those interested in a B.A. in Biological Sciences may elect a broad range of courses in the humanities or social sciences in place of the advanced chemistry or physics normally taken with the B.S. program. Students interested in environmental science should consider the multidisciplinary or systems approach to global environmental problems offered through the B.S. in Environmental Science Systems. Students interested in social, economic or policy aspects of the environment should consider the interdisciplinary major in environmental studies (see Interdisciplinary Programs section of this catalog). In addition, minors in biological sciences, environmental science systems and environmental studies are available.

The B.S. program in biological sciences also offers three optional concentrations in health professions, molecular biology and neurobiology. The B.A. program offers an optional concentration in biological education for students interested in teaching biological content to K-12 students.

In addition to the above, a five-year program leading to a B.S. degree in biological sciences and an M.S. in physician assistant studies is available to successful applicants. Through an articulation with Syracuse University’s College of Engineering, students can also pursue a five –year program leading to either a B.A. in Biological Sciences and M.S. Bioengineering or a B.S. in Environmental Science Systems and M.S. in Environmental Engineering Science (see Undergraduate Transfer Programs). Students interested in this option should choose one of the pre-engineering concentrations. An additional articulation with Syracuse University allows qualified students to apply for a five-year program leading to a B.S. in biological sciences and an M.S. in forensic science or biomedical forensic sciences. For more information see the Undergraduate Transfer Programs section of this catalog.

All students are encouraged to conduct research with faculty members.

College policy requires students to achieve a minimum GPA of 2.0 in their major in order to graduate. To help ensure that students can graduate on time, the department of biological sciences policy states that if students have not achieved a major (biological sciences) GPA of at least 2.0 after taking 12 credits of Le Moyne biology courses (3 lab courses), they will have one semester to raise their GPA to above 2.0. If a student does not achieve a minimum of 2.0 in the major at the end of that semester, he or she will need to petition the department in order to remain a biological sciences major.

B.S. Biological Sciences

(Graduate studies, health professions, veterinary, biochemistry, forensics, minor in chemistry and other areas)

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

B.S. Biological Sciences

Major RequirementsHours
BIO 191 General Biology I 4
BIO 192 General Biology II 4
BIO 218 Cell and Molecular Biology 4
BIO 225 The Poisoning of a Planet 3
Six additional BIO Courses. At least one course from each group: Molecular and Cellular; Organismal; and Ecology and Population. At least four must have a lab compenent. (see course groups below)22-24
Major SupportHours
CHM 151 Chemical Principles I 3
CHM 151L Chemical Principles I Laboratory 1
CHM 152 Chemical Principles II 3
CHM 152L Chemical Principles II Lab 1
CHM 223 Organic Chemistry I 3
CHM 223L Organic Chemistry 1 Lab 1
CHM 224 Organic Chemistry II 3
CHM 224L Organic Chemistry II Lab 1
PHY 101-102 or 105-106 General Physics (with lab)8
MTH 110 or 111 and MTH 112 (Two semesters of MTH 145-146 may be substituted. Please note that most allied health programs and many other graduate programs require at least one semester of statistics. Students should consult with their advisors to determine which math they should take.)6-7
Electives 15
Other RequirementsHours
Molecular and Cellular Courses
BIO 320 Genetics4
BIO 321 Developmental Biology4
BIO 409 Virology3
BIO 410 Toxicology3
BIO 418 Advanced Molecular Biology4
BIO 427 Bioinformatics4
BIO 460 Biochemistry I3
BIO 461 Biochemistry II3
BIO 475 Stem Cell Biology3
BIO 480 Seminar: Biology of Cancer3
BIO 481 Seminar: Endocrine Disruptors3
Organismal Courses
BIO 281 Anatomy and Physiology I4
BIO 282 Anatomy and Physiology II4
BIO 322 Histology4
BIO 325 Microbiology4
BIO 327 Botany - The Biology of Plants4
BIO 340 Parasitology4
BIO 350 Invertebrate Biology4
BIO 375 Introduction to Neurobiology4
BIO 381 Disease and Disorders of the Nervous System3
BIO 412 Immunology3
BIO 431 Mammalian Physiology3
Ecology and Population Courses
BIO 230 General Ecology4
BIO 245 Evolution4
BIO 270 Animal Behavior4
BIO 330 Tropical Marine Biology4
BIO 335 Biodiversity3
BIO 348 Environ Research in the Field: Iceland4
BIO 360 Insect Ecology4
BIO 458 Global Climate Systems3
BIO 470 Seminar: Environmental Topics3
BIO 471 Perspectives on Human Life3

Health Professions Concentration

Students in the Health Professions concentration must take two courses from the health professions group (at least one course must be a lab course):

Concentration CoursesHours
BIO 281 Anatomy and Physiology I 4
BIO 282 Anatomy and Physiology II 4
BIO 321 Developmental Biology 4
BIO 322 Histology 4
BIO 325 Microbiology 4
BIO 375 Introduction to Neurobiology 4
BIO 381 Disease and Disorders of the Nervous System 3
BIO 409 Virology 3
BIO 410 Toxicology 3
BIO 412 Immunology 3
BIO 431 Mammalian Physiology 3
BIO 475 Stem Cell Biology 3
BIO 480 Seminar: Biology of Cancer 3
BIO 481 Seminar: Endocrine Disruptors 3

Neurobiology Concentration

Students in the Neurobiology concentration must take BIO 375 Introduction to Neurobiology, PSY 101, plus one of the following biology courses and three psychology courses:

Concentration CoursesHours
BIO 270 Animal Behavior 4
BIO 381 Disease and Disorders of the Nervous System 3
BIO 405 Endocrinology 4
BIO 410 Toxicology 3
BIO 431 Mammalian Physiology 3
BIO 481 Seminar: Endocrine Disruptors 3
Three additional PSY courses 9
PSY 220 Human Life Span Development3
PSY 230 Motivation and Emotion3
PSY 250 Cognition3
PSY 270 Learning3
PSY 325 Sensation and Perception3
PSY 340 Brain and Behavior3
PSY 448 Clinical Neuropsychology3

Molecular Biology Concentration

Students in the Molecular Biology concentration must take all of the following courses:

Concentration CoursesHours
BIO 418 Advanced Molecular Biology 4
BIO 460 Biochemistry I 3
BIO 461 Biochemistry II 3
BIO 462 Biochemistry Laboratory 1

Typical Program for B.S. Biological Sciences

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
BIO 1914 BIO 1924
CHM 1513 CHM 1523
CHM 151L1 CHM 152L1
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
COR 1003 Social Science3
Elective3
Sophomore Year
BIO 2184 BIO 2253
CHM 2233 CHM 2243
CHM 223L1 CHM 224L1
MTH 110 or MTH 1113 MTH 1123
HST 1103 HST 1113
Theology3 ENG 2103
Junior Year
BIO Elective3/4 BIO Elective3/4
PHY 101 or PHY 1053 PHY 102 or PHY 1063
PHY 1031 PHY 1041
ENG 3103 IDS3
EAC3 EAC3
PHL 2103 Elective3
Senior Year
BIO Elective3/4 BIO Elective3/4
BIO Elective4 BIO Elective4
Religion3 COR 400A3
Elective3 Elective3
Elective3

Typical Program for B.S. in Biological Sciences and M.S. Physician Assistant Studies 3+2

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
BIO 1914 BIO 1924
CHM 1513 CHM 1523
CHM 151L1 CHM 152L1
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
MTH 110 or MTH 1113 MTH 1123
COR 1003 Social Science3
Sophomore Year
BIO 2184 BIO 2253
CHM 2233 CHM 2243
CHM 223L1 CHM 224L1
HST 1103 HST 1113
EAC/Language3 EAC/Language3
Theology3 ENG 2103
Junior Year
BIO 2814 BIO 2824
PHY 101/PHY 1053 PHY 102/PHY 1063
PHY 1031 PHY 1041
ENG 3103 Social Science3
Religion3 BIO Elective3
BIO Elective3 PHL 2103
Senior Year
BIO [PAS]4 BIO [PAS]4
IDS [PAS]3 COR 400A [PAS]3

Note: fourth year is the first year of the P.A. curriculum. Only P.A. courses counting specifically towards core or major graduation requirements are indicated above; some other P.A. courses count as free electives. For complete typical program in the fourth and fifth year, see the physician assistant studies typical program in the graduate section of this catalog.

B.A. Biological Sciences

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

B.A. Biological Sciences

Major RequirementsHours
BIO 191 General Biology I 4
BIO 192 General Biology II 4
BIO 218 Cell and Molecular Biology 4
BIO 225 The Poisoning of a Planet 3
Four additional BIO courses. At least once course from each group: Molecular and Cellular; Organismal; and Ecology and Population. At least three must have a lab component. (See course listing under B.S. Biological Sciences)15-16
Major SupportHours
CHM 151 Chemical Principles I 3
CHM 151L Chemical Principles I Laboratory 1
CHM 152 Chemical Principles II 3
CHM 152L Chemical Principles II Lab 1
CHM, PHY or MTH sequence Students choosing a PHY or CHM sequence must still one take one semester of MTH to fulfill core requirements.6-8
Electives 33

Biological Education Concentration with Certification in Dual Childhood/Special Education (Grades 1-6)

Major RequirementsHours
BIO 191 General Biology I 4
BIO 192 General Biology II 4
BIO 218 Cell and Molecular Biology 4
BIO 225 The Poisoning of a Planet 3
BIO 315 Biology in Practice:Lab & Field Approac 3
Three additional BIO courses, at least one course from each group: Molecular and Cellular, Organismal, Ecology and Population. All must be lab courses. (See course listing under B.S. Biological Sciences)12
Major SupportHours
CHM 151 Chemical Principles I 3
CHM 151L Chemical Principles I Laboratory 1
CHM 152 Chemical Principles II 3
CHM 152L Chemical Principles II Lab 1
MTH 110, 111 or 145 3/4
MTH 102 Mathematics for Educators 3
Education RequirementsHours
EDU 105 Teaching in a Diverse Society 3
EDU 150 Contemporary Perspectives on Special Ed 3
EDU 120 Child Abuse Workshop/SAVE Violence Prev 0
EDU 205 Childhood Learning and Special Needs 3
EDU 225 Assess & Dec Making for Equity/Inclusion 3
EDU 305 Prin & Methods of Multicultural Literacy 3
EDU 315 Plan,Assessing,Managing Inclusive Clsrm 3
EDU 365 Adapting Literacy Lrn Stu W/Spec Needs 3
EDU 375 Strategies & Technol for Inclusive Clsrm 3
EDU 376 Managing Environ for Stu W/ Disabilities 3
EDU 405 Preservice Clinical Teaching Seminar 3
EDU 430 Supervised Preservice Teach/Grades 1-6 6
EDU 431 Supervised Preserv Teaching (SPE 1-6) Supervised Preservice Teach (SPE 1-6) 6

Biological Education Concentration with Education Minor with Certification in Adolescence Education (Grades 7-12)

Major RequirementsHours
BIO 191 General Biology I 4
BIO 192 General Biology II 4
BIO 218 Cell and Molecular Biology 4
BIO 225 The Poisoning of a Planet 3
BIO 315 Biology in Practice:Lab & Field Approac 3
Three additional BIO courses, one from each course group: Molecular and Cellular; Organismal; and Ecology and Population. All must have a lab component. (See course listing under B.S. Biological Sciences)12
Major SupportHours
CHM 151 Chemical Principles I 3
CHM 151L Chemical Principles I Laboratory 1
CHM 152 Chemical Principles II 3
CHM 152L Chemical Principles II Lab 1
CHM or PHY sequence 8
MTH 110, MTH 111 or MTH 145 3/4
CHM or PHS/PHY* 3/4
Education RequirementsHours
EDU 105 Teaching in a Diverse Society 3
EDU 150 Contemporary Perspectives on Special Ed 3
EDU 120 Child Abuse Workshop/SAVE Violence Prev 0
EDU 215 Learning in a Sociocultural Context 3
EDU 303 Multicultural Literacy Methods 3
EDU 315 Plan,Assessing,Managing Inclusive Clsrm 3
EDU 325 Teach/Adapt Curric Content Specialists 3
EDU 335 Literacy Development in the Content Area 3
EDU 401 Adolescent Strategies and Technology 4
EDU 405 Preservice Clinical Teaching Seminar 3
EDU 450 Supervised Preservice Teaching (7-9) 6
EDU 460 Supervised Preservice Teaching (10-12) 6

* Must have at least one semester of PHY/PHS for certification in general science

Biological Education Concentration with Education Minor with Certification in Dual Adolescence Education/Special Education (Grades 7-12)

Major RequirementsHours
BIO 191 General Biology I 4
BIO 192 General Biology II 4
BIO 218 Cell and Molecular Biology 4
BIO 225 The Poisoning of a Planet 3
BIO 315 Biology in Practice:Lab & Field Approac 3
Three additional BIO courses, one from each course group: Molecular and Cellular; Organismal; and Ecology and Population. All must have lab component. (See course listings under B.S. Biological Sciences)12
Major SupportHours
CHM 151 Chemical Principles I 3
CHM 151L Chemical Principles I Laboratory 1
CHM 152 Chemical Principles II 3
CHM 152L Chemical Principles II Lab 1
MTH 110 or MTH 111 and MTH 112 Statistics 6-7
Education RequirementsHours
EDU 105 Teaching in a Diverse Society 3
EDU 150 Contemporary Perspectives on Special Ed 3
EDU 120 Child Abuse Workshop/SAVE Violence Prev 0
EDU 215 Learning in a Sociocultural Context 3
EDU 225 Assess & Dec Making for Equity/Inclusion 3
EDU 303 Multicultural Literacy Methods 3
EDU 315 Plan,Assessing,Managing Inclusive Clsrm 3
EDU 325 Teach/Adapt Curric Content Specialists 3
EDU 335 Literacy Development in the Content Area 3
EDU 345 Collabor&Transition Plan Stu Spec Needs 3
EDU 401 Adolescent Strategies and Technology 4
EDU 405 Preservice Clinical Teaching Seminar 3
EDU 451 Supervised Preserv Teaching (SPE 7-12) 6
EDU 460 Supervised Preservice Teaching (10-12) or EDU 4506

B.A. in Biology with a Concentration in Pre-Engineering

Major RequirementsHours
BIO 191 General Biology I 4
BIO 192 General Biology II 4
BIO 218 Cell and Molecular Biology 4
BIO 225 The Poisoning of a Planet 3
Four additional BIO courses, at least one from each course group: Molecular and Cellular, Organismal, and Ecology and Population. At least three must have a lab component. (see course descriptions under B.S. in Biological Sciences)16
Major SupportHours
CHM 151 Chemical Principles I 3
CHM 151L Chemical Principles I Laboratory 1
CHM 152 Chemical Principles II 3
CHM 152L Chemical Principles II Lab 1
PHY 105 General Physics Scientists/Engineers I 3
PHY 106 General Physics Scientists/Engineers II 3
PHY 103 General Physics Laboratory 1
PHY 104 General Physics Laboratory 1
MTH 145 Calculus I 4
MTH 146 Calculus II 4
MTH 245 Calculus III 4
MTH 304 Differential Equations for Scientists And Engineers 4
MTH 311 Introduction to Probability Theory 3
MTH 312 Mathematical Statistics 3
BEN 364* 3
Other RequirementsHours
CHM 223 Organic Chemistry I 3
CHM 223L Organic Chemistry 1 Lab 1
PHY 251 Spc Topic: Fundamentals of Engineering 3
ECS 221* 3
ELE 231* 3
ELE 232* 3
ECS 326* 3
BEN 468* 3
BEN 575* (This course is part of graduate curriculum)3

* Taken at Syracuse University

** For more details on the five year dual bachelor's/master's degree in engineering program offered in affiliation with Syracuse University, please refer to the Undergraduate Transfer Programs portion of this catalog.

Typical Program for B.A. Biological Sciences

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
BIO 1914 BIO 1924
CHM 1513 CHM 1523
CHM 151L1 CHM 152L1
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
COR 1003 Elective3
Social Science3
Sophomore Year
BIO 2184 BIO 2253
MTH 110 or Elective*3 Elective3
HST 1103 HST 1113
EAC3 EAC3
Theology3 ENG 2103
Junior Year
BIO Elective3/4 BIO Elective3/4
PHY/CHM/MTH*3/4 PHY/CHM/MTH3/4
Elective3 Elective3
ENG 3103 IDS3
PHL 2103 Elective3
Senior Year
BIO Elective3/4 BIO Elective3/4
Religion3 COR 400A3
Elective3 Elective3
Elective3 Elective3
Elective3

* All biology majors must take at least one semester of statistics (MTH 110 or 111); this will satisfy the College Core requirement for Mathematics. Students choosing a two semester sequence in Chemistry or Physics must also take at least one semester of statistics (MTH 110 or 111); students who choose to take both semesters of statistics may take an additional free elective. Students should consult with faculty advisors to determine which option is best depending on career goals.

Typical Program for Biological Education Concentration with Certification in Dual Childhood/Special Education (Grades 1-6)

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
BIO 1914 BIO 1924
CHM 1513 CHM 1523
CHM 151L1 CHM 152L1
EDU 1053 EDU 1503
COR 1003 ENG 2103
Sophomore Year
HST 1103 HST 1113
BIO 2184 PHL 2103
EDU 2053 BIO 2253
EAC3 EDU 2253
MTH 1023 EAC3
Junior Year
BIO 3153 EDU 3653
ENG 3103 EDU 3753
EDU 3053 BIO Elective4
EDU 3153 Religion3
MTH 110, 111 or 1453/4 EDU 3763
Senior Year
EDU 4053 Theology3
EDU 1200 COR 400A3
EDU 4306 BIO Elective4
EDU 4316 BIO Elective4
IDS3

Typical Program for Biological Education Concentration with Education Minor with Certification in Adolescence Education (Grades 7-12)

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
BIO 1914 BIO 1924
CHM 1513 CHM 1523
CHM 151L1 CHM 152L1
EDU 1053 EDU 1503
COR 1003 ENG 2103
Sophomore Year
HST 1103 HST 1113
BIO 2184 Theology3
EDU 2153 PHL 210 or ENG 3103
MTH 110 or MTH 1113 EAC3
EAC3 BIO Elective4
Optional Summer Session
ENG 310 or PHL 2103
Junior Year
EDU 3033 BIO 2253
EDU 3153 CHM/PHY**3
PHY/CHM3 BIO Elective4
BIO Elective4 EDU 3253
IDS3 EDU 3353
Senior Year
BIO 3153 EDU 4053
COR 400A3 EDU 1200
EDU 4014 EDU 4506
Religion3 EDU 4606
CHM/PHS**3

** This schedule for adolescent teacher preparation programs will allow students to be certified in both biology and general science. NOTE: to be certified in general science, students must take at least one science course in each of CHM and PHY/PHS and have a total of at least 18 credits in sciences other than biology. Students who wish to obtain certification in dual adolescent and special education will need to take two additional EDU courses; they cannot take the extra CHM/PHS to be certified in general science unless they take several summer classes.

Typical Program for Biological Education Concentration with Education Minor with Certification in Dual Adolescence Education/Special Education (Grades 7-12)

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
BIO 1914 BIO 1924
CHM 1513 CHM 1513
CHM 151L1 CHM 151L1
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
COR 1003 EDU 1503
EDU 1053 ENG 2103
Sophomore Year
BIO 2184 BIO 2253
MTH 110 or MTH 1113 MTH 1123
HST 1103 HST 1113
EDU 2153 EAC3
EAC3 EDU 2253
Optional Summer Session
ENG 310 or PHL 2103
Junior Year
BIO Elective4 BIO Elective4
Theology3 BIO Elective4
EDU 3033 EDU 3253
EDU 3153 EDU 3353
ENG 310 or PHL 2103 IDS3
Senior Year
BIO 3153 EDU 1200
EDU 3453 EDU 4053
Religion3 EDU 450 or EDU 4606
COR 400A3 EDU 4516
EDU 4014

Typical Program for B.A. in Biology with a Concentration in Pre-Engineering

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
BIO 1914 BIO 1924
CHM 1513 CHM 1523
CHM 151L1 CHM 152L1
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
MTH 1454 MTH 1464
COR 1003 Social Science3
Sophomore Year
BIO 2184 BIO Elective3-4
PHY 1053 PHY 1063
PHY 1031 PHY 1041
MTH 2454 MTH 3044
HST 1103 HST 1113
Theology3 ENG 2103
J-mester
PHY 2513
Junior Year
BIO 2253 PHL 2103
MTH 3113 MTH 3123
ENG 3103 BIO Elective3-4
CHM 2233 ECS 221*3
CHM 223L1 ELE 232*3
ELE 231*3
Senior Year
EAC3 EAC3
IDS3 COR 400A3
Religion3 BEN 364*3
BIO Elective3-4 BEN 468*3
ECS 326*3 BEN 575*3

*Courses taken at Syracuse University

Biology Minor

To complete a minor in biological sciences (minimum 15 credits), students must complete BIO 191-192 or equivalent and two other biology classes, at least one of which must be a lab course. None of these courses may be taken pass/fail, and at least one course must be numbered BIO 210 or higher. All prerequisites must be met. Courses that do not count towards the biology major are not acceptable.

Environmental Science Systems

The Environmental Science Systems major emphasizes a multidisciplinary or systems approach to scientific and environmental problems. The primary goal of the major is to train majors in a systems approach to scientific problems in general and problems of global change in particular. By exposing students to the problems of understanding, measuring, and predicting the consequences of global change, and by providing them with field-based research experiences at an early point in their academic careers, we hope to stimulate an interest in these young scientists in pursuing research-oriented career paths.

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

Environmental Science Systems Major

NOTE: A minimum of seven courses from the major requirements must be lab or field courses, and at least seven BIO/ESS courses must be taken at Le Moyne College.

Major RequirementsHours
BIO 191 General Biology I 4
BIO 230 General Ecology 4
BIO 458 Global Climate Systems 3
BIO/ESS Elective 3/4
BIO/ESS upper level elective 3-4
BIO/ESS/CHM/PHY upper level electives 8
BSC/ESS 127, 128 or 129 Earth's Global Enironment: Galapagos/Global Ecosystems: Costa Rica, North America 3
ESS 121 Global Resources 3
ESS 205 Physical Geology 4
ESS 320 Earth's Surface 4
ESS 335 Biodiversity 3
ESS 499 Research in Bio & Environmental Systems (or ESS 490 Internship in Environmental Science)3
Major SupportHours
CHM 151 Chemical Principles I 3
CHM 151L Chemical Principles I Laboratory 1
CHM 152 Chemical Principles II 3
CHM 152L Chemical Principles II Lab 1
PHY 101-102 Non-Calculus General Physics or PHY 105-106 General Physics for Scientists and Engineers (with lab) 8
Two of the following: 6-8
MTH 110/MTH 111 Introduction to Statistics I3
MTH 112 Introduction to Statistics II3
MTH 145 Calculus I4
MTH 146 Calculus II4
Electives 6

Typical Program for Environmental Science Systems Major

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
BIO 1914 CHM 1523
CHM 1513 CHM 152L1
CHM 151L1 BIO 1924
WRT 1013 ESS 1213
HST 1103 PHL 1103
COR 1003 HST 1113
Sophomore Year
MTH 1454 ESS 2054
Free elective3 MTH 1464
ENG 2103 ESS 128*3
PHL 2103 Theology3
EAC3 EAC3
Junior Year
ESS 3204 BIO 3353
BIO 2304 BIO/ESS Elective3/4
PHY 101/1034 BIO/ESS Elective3/4
VPA1 PHY 102/1044
ENG 3103
Senior Year
BIO/ESS Elective3/4 Social Science3
ESS 4993 IDS3
Free elective3 BIO 4583
Free elective3 COR 400A3
Social Science3 Religion3

*Required field experience (could be as a part of BIO 330 or comparable course(s) and field trips to Costa Rica, Arizona or Ecuador)

Environmental Science Systems Minor

To complete a minor in Environmental Science Systems (17-19 credits), students must complete: BIO 191 or ESS 128; ESS 121 or BSC/ESS 127, 128 or 129; ESS 205 and two of the following: BIO 230, ESS 320, BIO/ESS 335 or BIO/ESS 458, none of which may be taken pass/fail.

Environmental Science Systems with a Concentration in Pre-Engineering

The environmental science systems B.S. can be taken with one of two possible pre-engineering concentrations to serve as the foundation for the Bachelor's in Environmental Science systems and either the Master's in Environmental Engineering or the Master's in Environmental Engineering Science degree program at Syracuse University. The second of these can be completed in 3 1/2 years through an accelerated program, allowing enrollment in graduate study one semester early (See Undergraduate Transfer Programs)

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science Systems - Pre-Engineering Concentration for Master of Science in Environmental Engineering

Major RequirementsHours
BIO 191-192 General Biology 8
BIO 230 General Ecology 4
BIO 335 Biodiversity 3
ESS 205 Physical Geology 4
ESS 320 Earth's Surface 4
ESS 458 Global Climate Systems 3
One of the following: 3
ESS 121 Global Resources3
ESS 127 Global Environment-Galapagos3
ESS 128 Global Ecosystems: Costa Rica3
ESS 129 Global Ecosystems: North America3
Research in Environmental Science (ESS 499) or Internship (ESS 490) 3
Major SupportHours
CHM 151 Chemical Principles I 3
CHM 152 Chemical Principles II 3
PHY 105-103 4
PHY 106-104 4
MTH 110 or MTH 111 Statistics 3/4
MTH 145 Calculus I 4
MTH 146 Calculus II 4
MTH 245 Calculus III 4
MTH 304 Differential Equations for Scientists And Engineers 4
Other RequirementsHours
ECS 221* Statics 3
CIE 274* Sustainability 3
CIE 327* Fluid Mechanics 3
CIE 341* Environmental Engineering 3

*Bridge courses to be taken at Syracuse University

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science Systems - Pre-Engineering Concentration for Master of Science in Environmental Engineering Science

Major RequirementsHours
BIO 191 General Biology I 4
BIO 230 General Ecology 4
BIO 335 Biodiversity 3
ESS 121 Global Resources 3
ESS 205 Physical Geology 4
ESS 320 Earth's Surface 4
ESS 458 Global Climate Systems 3
ESS/BIO Elective (BIO 192 recommended) 3/4
One of the following: 3
ESS 127 Global Environment-Galapagos3
ESS 128 Global Ecosystems: Costa Rica3
ESS 129 Global Ecosystems: North America3
Research in Biology(ESS 499) or Internship (ESS 490) 3/4
Upper level BIO/ESS elective 4
Upper level elective (CIE 274 @ SU recommended) 3/4
Upper level elective (CIE 341 @ SU recommended) 3/4
Major SupportHours
CHM 151 Chemical Principles I 3
CHM 152 Chemical Principles II 3
PHY 101 or PHY 105 General Physics I 4
PHY 102 or PHY106 General Physics II 4
MTH 110 or MTH 111 Statistics 3/4
MTH 145 Calculus I 4
MTH 146 Calculus II 4

Typical Program for Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science Systems - Pre-Engineering Concentration for Master of Science in Environmental Engineering

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
BIO 1914 BIO 1924
MTH 1454 MTH 1464
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
HST 1103 HST 1113
COR 1003 ESS 1213
Sophomore Year
PHY 105-1034 PHY 106-1044
MTH 2454 MTH 3044
ENG 2103 Theology3
PHL 2103 ESS 2054
EAC3 EAC3
Junior Year
BIO 2304 BIO 3353
CHM 1513 CHM 1523
CHM 151L1 CHM 152L1
ESS 3204 CIE 274*3
ESS 4993 ECS 221*3
ENG 3103
Senior Year
MTH 110/1113-4 BIO 4583
Natural/Social Science3 COR 400A3
VPA1 Theology3
CIE 327*3 Social Science3
SYRE 341*3 Free Elective3

*Engineering courses at Syracuse University

Typical Program for Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science Systems - Pre-Engineering Concentration for Master of Science in Environmental Engineering Science

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
BIO 1914 BIO 1924
MTH 1454 MTH 1464
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
HST 1103 HST 1113
COR 1003 ESS 1213
Sophomore Year
PHY 105/1034 PHY 106/1044
ENG 2103 ESS 1283
MTH 110/1113/4 Theology3
PHL 2103 ESS 2054
EAC3 EAC3
Junior Year
BIO 2304 BIO 3353
CHM 1513 CHM 1523
CHM 151L1 CHM 152L1
ESS 3204 BIO/ESS Elective4
ESS 4993 CIE 274*3
ENG 3103
Senior Year
Free Elective3 BIO 4583
Natural Science3 COR 400A3
VPA1 Theology3
Free Elective3 Social Science3
CIE 341*3 Free Elective3

*Engineering courses at Syracuse University

Courses


BIO 191 . General Biology I (4).

This course introduces fundamental unifying principles of biology. Topics include the scientific method, biological chemistry, cell structure and function, membranes, energetics, cellular regulation and control, genetics, cell division and evolution. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 192 . General Biology II (4).

This course, while continuing to stress fundamental unifying principles of biology, presents the mechanisms that allow all living organisms to meet the common requirements for life. Topics include classification/diversity; basic characteristics of all kingdoms of life; plant and animal development, form and physiology; ecology and population biology. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Dissection required. Carries biology major credit. Prerequisite: BIO 191 or permission.

BIO 218 . Cell and Molecular Biology (4).

This course is designed to introduce the student to cell biology and the concepts of genetics at the molecular level. Basic concepts of cell structure and function are presented from a biochemical perspective. Topics include metabolism, membranes, cytoskeleton, motility, and replication and expression of genetic information. Prerequisites: BIO 191-192; CHM 151-152 recommended or permission of instructor. Three hours lecture and three and a half hours laboratory per week. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 225 . The Poisoning of a Planet (3).

The pollution of our air, land, and water is an ecological problem of epidemic proportions. However, before we can come to grips with this menace, we must understand what we are facing. Our present situation results from economic conflicts, social attitudes, political indecision and the overuse and misuse of scientific and technological ideas. In this course, we will examine environmental issues such as resource depletion, pollution, overpopulation, and the nuclear winter. We will begin with the biological and ecological basis of these problems and then, in a multidisciplinary fashion, address the possible solutions and consequences of these issues. Prerequisites: BIO 191-192. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 230 . General Ecology (4).

This course uses an evolutionary approach to the study of the interrelationships of organisms with their environments. Topics include competition, co-evolution, population growth and regulation, demography, and predator-prey relationships. Laboratory work includes field study and basic methods for evaluation of data. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 191-192. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 245 . Evolution (4).

The nature of the evolutionary process is studied from a number of relevant points of view, including geology, paleontology, comparative anatomy, genetics, molecular biology and anthropology. The significant influence of evolutionary concepts on human thought is discussed. Prerequisites: B10 191-192. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 265 (ESS 265). Intro to Geographic Info Systems (3).

This course is designed to introduce students to Geographic Information Systems (GIS), a set of hardware, software, and methods for the capture, storage, management, manipulation, analysis, modeling, and display of geographic information. This course will provide an introduction to GIS applications and anylsis. Course work will emphasize use of industry standard software. Two hours lecture, two hours lab per week. Carries BIO and ESS major credit.

BIO 270 (PSY 303). Animal Behavior (4).

The mechanisms of animal and human behavior are investigated in a broad descriptive sample. Special emphasis is placed on the physiology, development and evolution of behavior patterns. Prerequisite: Eight credit hours of biology. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 281 . Anatomy and Physiology I (4).

Biology majors will study mammalian anatomy and physiology at a level appropriate for those interested in attending graduate programs in the health professions. This course is the first in a two-semester sequence. Following an overview of terminology and tissues, the skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine and integumentary systems will be covered. The cat is the primary dissection specimen in the laboratory; lab activities will integrate anatomy and physiology. Dissection required. Pre-requisites: BIO 191 and 192, CHM 151 and 152. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Carries biology major credit. Students may take either BIO 431 or BIO 281-282, but not both. Depending on the course instructor, the class format may be primarily traditional lectures OR may incorporate the significant use of a Learning Management System, e-lectures, case studies, and discussion. Students should consult the department chair regarding the lecture format prior to registering for this course.

BIO 282 . Anatomy and Physiology II (4).

This course is a continuation of BIO 281 in which biology majors will continue their study of mammalian anatomy and physiology. Systems covered include the circulatory, immune, respiratory, degistive, urinary, and reproductive. The cat is the primary dissection specimen in the laboratory; lab activities will integrate anatomy and physiology. Dissection required. Prerequisites: BIO 191 and 192, CHM 151 and 152, and a grade of C or better in BIO 281. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Carries biology major credit. Students may take either BIO 431 or BIO 281-282, but not both.

BIO 315 . Biology in Practice:Lab & Field Approac (3).

Aimed at providing students, especially those who are planning to teach, with additional laboratory field experience, this course explores empirical techniques currently used in a variety of biological subdisciplines. Formulation and testing of hypothesis, experimental design, data analysis and interpretation of results will be addressed. Students will have the opportunity to get hands-on experience with various techniques as well as methods analysis. A major objective of the course is the development of exercises utilizing these techniques to foster inquiry-based learning in biology. Writing techniques appropriate to the discipline will also be an important component. Prerequisites: BIO 191, BIO 192, BIO 218.

BIO 320 . Genetics (4).

This course will teach students the fundamental concepts underlying the field of genetics and introduce them to the increasing role that genetics plays in society. Lectures and labs will cover principles of both classical and molecular genetics. Topics covered include inheritance, gene expression, population genetics, and biotechnology. Prerequisite: BIO 218. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory weekly. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 321 . Developmental Biology (4).

This course will study embryogenesis (fertilization to birth) as well as development during later stages of life. We will examine the cellular, genetic, and molecular aspects of these processes in a number of different species. This information will be supplemented with the experimental data that led to these discoveries. The laboratory portion of this course will involve students designing and carrying out their own experiments. Prerequisite: BIO 218. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 322 . Histology (4).

Following a consideration of fundamental tissues, most of the organ systems of the mammalian body are studied showing how these systems are actually combinations of the basic tissues. Prerequisites: BIO 191, BIO 192, BIO 218. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 325 . Microbiology (4).

This course emphasizes bacteria, but also deals with other groups of organisms recognized as microbes. Topics include the structure, physiology, differentiation and genetics of microorganisms, as well as ecological, industrial and disease relationships. Prerequisites: BIO 191 BIO 192, BIO 218. CHM 223 and CHM 224 recommended. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 327 . Botany - The Biology of Plants (4).

The activities of plants support life on earth. An understanding of the biology of plants influences the welfare of humans and other animals. This course explores the diversity and basic biology of plants. Topics include classification, physiology, morphology, evolution, and life cycles. Prerequisites or corequisites: BIO 191-192,CHM 151-152. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 330 . Tropical Marine Biology (4).

Tropical ecology differs in many respects from that of temperate regions. The most striking of these differences occurs in the marine environment. Semester activities will include weekly meetings in which we will examine the flora, fauna and processes that characterize tropical marine systems. The course will end with 10-14 days of intensive field work in the Bahamas, studying the principles discussed in class with special attention to field and lab work as well as an individual research project. Prerequisite: BIO 191 BIO 192 and permission of the instructor. Separate fees will be required for the field portion of the course. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 335 (ESS 335). Biodiversity (3).

The course is designed to acquaint the student with the phenomenal diversity of life with which we share this planet. To do this, we will refresh the students' memories concerning evolution and the various mechanisms through which communities of life forms have become adapted to their environment. We will spend some time with taxonomy and biogeography before we can begin to examine the current state of biodiversity as well as future trends. The implications of these trends will signal a stopping point for the course but will hopefully serve as a beginning for the student as they move away from Le Moyne and take a place in society. Prerequisites: Minimum of 10 BIO/ESS credits.

BIO 340 . Parasitology (4).

Parasitism is the most prevalent and one of the most biologically complex of all symbiotic relationships. Parasites historically have had and continue to have a tremendous impact on the health and welfare of humans and other animals. This course explores the diversity of parasitic organisms and the adaptations which permit them to live in or on other organisms, as well as consequences to the host. Prerequisites or corequisites: BIO 191-192 and one 200-level course. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 348 (ESS 348). Environ Research in the Field: Iceland (4).

The environment of Iceland is shaped by the immensely dynamic geologic processes of active volcanoes and glaciers, but this environment is also deceptively fragile and subject to anthropogenic influence. The present landscape has resulted from this interaction of human and natural processes. A semester of classroom activity culminates in a field session where students conduct research on the processes of environmental change in Iceland.

BIO 350 . Invertebrate Biology (4).

This course introduces the study of invertebrate animals; classification, structure and life cycles are presented in detail. Prerequisites: BIO 191-192. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 360 . Insect Ecology (4).

Insects outnumber all other species on this planet, and they have crucial roles in ecosystem structure and processes. This course explores the diversity of interactions between insects and other organisms in ecosystems, as well as insects' impact on the non-living environment. Prerequisites: BIO 191, 192, BIO 225. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 375 . Introduction to Neurobiology (4).

The uniqueness of the central nervous system is explored in lectures and laboratory sessions dealing with the developmental, anatomical, and physiological aspects of neurobiology. This course is intended for biology and psychology majors and may be taken by others who are minoring in biology. Three lectures and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites and corequisites: BIO 191-192, BIO 218; CHM 223 is recommended, or by permission of instructor.

BIO 380 (LIB 380). Information in the Biological Sciences (1).

This course will introduce the changing information landscape in the biological sciences, and help students become advanced database and "free web" searchers. Students will also become familiar with the social and ethical issues relating to the production and use of scientific information in an increasingly digital society. Prerequisite(s): BIO 191, BIO 192, and BIO 218 or permission of instructor.

BIO 381 . Disease and Disorders of the Nervous System (3).

This course will examine several diseases and disorders of the nervous system. Symptoms, dianoses, and prognoses of numerous pathologies will be investigated along with in-depth discussions of the anatomical and physiological changes that occur relative to the healthy nervous system. A particular emphasis will be placed on cellular and molecular changes. Students will supplement lecture material with primary literature searches investigating ongoing research including current and future strategies to treat and detect the disorders. Case studies will also be utilized to demonstrate how dysfunction can manifest in the patient, subsequently reinforcing our understanding of how the nervous system performs. Prerequisites: BIO 218; also BIO 281-282 or BIO 375 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 390 (ESS 390). Independent Study in Bio & Natural Syst (1-3).

A student may pursue a semester or more of independent study in a specialized area of biology of mutual interest to the student and one or more members of the faculty in the department. This course is for the above average student whose interests and abilities go farther than normal course offerings. Proposals, indicating credit sought, must have approval prior to registration. Prerequisites or corequisites: 15 credit hours in BIO in addition to BIO 380. Carries biology major credit for the tenth biology course.

BIO 409 . Virology (3).

This course will explore fundamental aspects of viral biology including viral replication strategies, structural attributes, virus evolution and tactics used by viruses to evade host immune responses. Several currently relevant viruses will be discussed in detail to explore how molecular features of viruses impact human disease. In addition, we will discuss the broader applications of virology with particular emphasis on viruses and cancer, the use of viruses in vaccine approaches and gene therapy, targeting bacterial infections with bacteriophage and newly emerging viruses. In addition to lecture material, students will critically read and discuss primary virological literature.

BIO 410 . Toxicology (3).

This course is designed to be of interest to students of environmental biology as well as those planning for a career in the health professions. General principles and mechanisms of toxicology, effects of exposure to different types of toxins, and various applications of toxicology will be discussed. Prerequisites or corequisites: BIO 191, 192, 218; CHM 223, 224. Three hours of lecture per week. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 412 . Immunology (3).

This course will offer students the opportunity to study the function of one of the human body's most intricate, and somewhat underappreciated systems. Students will examine how the human immune system is capable of producing a coordinated response to combat infectious organisms as well as what can happen when the immune system functions improperly. Coupled with establishing a base of immunology fundamentals will be the opportunity for the students to apply the knowledge acquired from text readings and from lecture. Through the individual and group discussion of primary scientific literature throughout the semester the student will be able to develop critical thinking and analytical skills. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: BIO 218. BIO 281 and 282 are recommended.

BIO 418 . Advanced Molecular Biology (4).

This is an advanced, lab-intensive course focusing on the application and development of molecular genetic data. Lectures will focus on the practical applications of molecular data to address ecological, evolutionary, and medical questions. Lectures will also provide students with the theoretical background necessary to understand current molecular analytical and lab techniques. Labs will provide students with hands-on experience generating and analyzing molecular genetic data. Two hours lecture and six hours laboratory per week. prerequisites or corequisites: BIO 218; CHM 223-224 and at least junior standing.

BIO 420-424 . Topics in Biology (3-4).

This course has a seminar and lecture format to study selected questions in biology. Student participation in discussions is an important part of the course. Prerequisites: 15 credit hours in biology and permission of the instructor. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 422 . Special Topics in Biology: Criminalistics for Biologists (3).

This course will allow upper level biology majors to discover how information they have learned in their natural and phsycial science courses is utilized in criminalistics. In addition to lectures, students will participate in a number of "hands on" mini-laboratory sessions that will allow them to perform techniques used in the collection of evidence from a crime scene, as well as laboratory analyses of this evidence. Prerequisites for this course include completion of BIO 218 and CHM 224; recommended courses include completion of BIO 281-282 and two semester of physics. Prerequisites: BIO 218, CHM 224.

BIO 427 . Bioinformatics (4).

Bioinformatics is the use of computer technology to store and analyze large genetic and genomic datasets. The availability of these datasets and increasing computational abilities have led to a "bioinformatics revolution" in biology with applications in many biological disciplines, including molecular ecology and health care. In this course, students will learn the theory behind the major concepts of bioinformatics and apply this knowledge analyzing biological datasets in computer labs. Topics covered may include searching sequence databases, sequence alignment, sequence motif discovery, phylogenetic analyses, analysis of protein and nucleic acid structure and genome mapping. Three hours lecture and three hours computer laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 218. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 427L . Bioinformatics Lab ().

BIO 431 . Mammalian Physiology (3).

This course is designed to teach basic principles of mammalian physiology involving the following systems: nervous, endocrine, muscular, circulatory, excretory, digestive, immune and reproductive. Prerequisites: BIO 191-192, BIO 218. CHM 223-224 recommended. Carries biology major credit. Students may take either BIO 431 or BIO 281-282, but not both.

BIO 458 (ESS 458). Global Climate Systems (3).

In this class, students will come to recognize that Earth's biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere operate in complexly linked systems in which various components are exchanged over greatly varying time scales. Using laboratory and field studies, students will measure, discuss and define the impact of global change on natural systems. Prerequisites: Chm151/152 and a minimum of 15 credits of BIO, including at least one course in the Ecology/Population Biology Area.

BIO 460 (CHM 460). Biochemistry I (3).

A lecture course in the chemistry of physiologically relevant compounds. These include proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. The interactions, regulation and metabolism of these compounds will be introduced. Prerequisites: CHM 224 and BIO 191 or permission of instructor. Three hours of lecture per week. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 461 (CHM 461). Biochemistry II (3).

This course is a continuation of BIO 460. Topics to be covered include cellular metabolism and energy production; synthesis and degradation of lipids, amino acids, nucleotides; and regulation of gene expression. Prerequisite: BIO 460. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 462 (CHM 462). Biochemistry Laboratory (1).

This laboratory will introduce techniques for studying proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Prerequisites: CHM 224 and BIO 191, or permission of instructor. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 460. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 470 (PSC 470/ESS 470). Seminar: Environmental Topics (3).

This advanced seminar provides students with the opportunity to explore the complexity of environmental issues in detail. By choosing current topics and analyzing the scientific and socio-economic factors underlying environmental problems, students will develop greater awareness and understanding of society's ability to mitigate these problems. This course places a high emphasis on oral and written presentation skills.

BIO 471 . Perspectives on Human Life (3).

The meaning and implications of biological evolution, genetic engineering and population growth are considered in this course, with special reference to the consequences of the issues on human life. Prerequisites: BIO 191-192. Three hours lecture/week. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 475 . Stem Cell Biology (3).

This course will examine the relatively new and expanding field of Stem Cell Biology. Students will dissect and analyze the most current primary literature from this exciting new field along with examining the basic science of molecular biology, fate determination, cell proliferation and differentiation. We will analyze the biology and ethics involved in this repidly growing field and discuss the direction this field might and perhaps should go in. Throughout this course we will discuss how this field of study may impact our lives along with the potential benefits and dangers of this pursuit. Prerequisite: BIO 218.

BIO 480 . Seminar: Biology of Cancer (3).

This seminar will offer advanced students the opportunity to further develop research and presentation skills required in graduate or medical school. Cancer biology is an area of intense research in fields ranging from toxicology and environmental biology to molecular biology. This seminar will examine the cell and molecular basis of cancer as a means to improve students' ability to critically evaluate the scientific literature. Students will select papers from the scientific literature for analysis and presentation in both written and oral formats. Students may be required to attend a scientific lecture off campus during the semester. Prerequisites or corequisites: BIO 218 and junior or senior standing in biological sciences or biochemistry or permission of the instructor. Three hours of lecture per week. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 481 . Seminar: Endocrine Disruptors (3).

This seminar will offer upper level students in the sciences the opportunity to develop or enhance research and presentation skills required in graduate or professional school.Improper use and disposal of chemicals and physical agents by humans have caused a number of adverse effects in all living things. This seminar will specifically focus on environmental contaminants that have been shown to alter the function of the endocrine system in wildlife and humans. Although this course will utilize textbooks, it will rely heavily on the scientific literature for additional readings and assignments. Students may be required to attend one scientific lecture off campus during the semester. Prerequisites or corequisites: BIO 218, junior or senior standing in biological sciences or biochemistry or permission of the instructor. Carries biology major credit.

BIO 490 . Internship in Biology (1-3).

A limited number of students observe, study or participate in a learning experience in a setting relevant to their specific interests and needs. Students take an active role in finding internship opportunities. Prerequisite: 15 credit hours in biology and permission of the department. Counts as college free elective.

BIO 499 (ESS 499). Research in Bio & Environmental Systems (3).

The student conducts a laboratory or field investigation under the guidance of the faculty in the department. Proposals, indicating credits sought, must have approval prior to registration. Written research report and oral public presentation of the research are required. Prerequisites and corequisites: 15 credit hours in environmental science or biology in addition to BIO 380. For biology majors, three credits of BIO 499 carries credit for the 10th biology course. For ESS majors, three credits of ESS 499 is required for graduation.

BSC 105 . Exercise Physiology (3).

This course studies the physiology of exercise, including concepts of work, muscle contraction, energy transformation, metabolism, oxygen debt, nutrition and athletic performance. Emphasis is placed on cardiovascular and respiratory function in relation to physical activity and training. No prerequisite. Three hours lecture/week. Does not carry biology major credit.

BSC 110 . Paleobiology - Dinosaurs & Their World (3).

The term "paleobiology" encompasses the study of any ancient life, but this course focuses on a single group, the dinosaurs, an incredibly diverse assemblage of animals that dominated the ancient landscape for over 130 million years. The public appreciation and fascination with dinosaurs has grown steadily in the 180 years following their modern discovery. This course uses dinosaurs as a vehicle for a broader investigation of the biological and physical systems that comprise planet Earth, and the inter-related nature of these systems as they relate to the evolution and extinction of Earth's inhabitants over the vast- ness of geologic time. Does not carry biology major credit.

BSC 111 . Ecology and the Environment (3).

This course focuses on basic ecological principles, especially the effects of human activities on our life-supporting environment. No prerequisite. Three hours lecture/ week. Does not carry biology major credit. This course may not be taken by biology majors as a free elective. Minors should consult with the department chair.

BSC 114 . Survival of the Fitness (3).

This course will broadly examine the role of food, nutrition and exercise on the body. Current issues such as diabetes and obesity will addressed from the lens of physical fitness and food intake. Students will survey their own fitness and participate in activities investiagting the effects of physical activity on the body. Some class periods will be held in the recreation center. Does not carry biology major credit.

BSC 115 . Hormones and Your Health (3).

This course for non-science majors, designed to fulfill the core science requirement, will introduce students to the importance of appropriate hormone function to their health. Students will learn basic concepts of hormone production, release, circulation throughout the body, and how hormones are required for proper body function. Alterations of normal hormone function by environmental toxins, one's health status and common medications will also be discussed. Three hours of lecture per week. Does not carry biology major credit.

BSC 118 . Medicine, Media, Myths: Fact Or Fiction? (3).

This course for non-science majors is designed to fulfill the core science requirement. In this course, we will examine some important biological topics in the popular media including vaccines, bird flu, and stem cells. With inconsistent and ever-changing media attention, political bias, corporate spin, or lack of information, it is sometimes difficult to know what the real scientific evidence suggests. We will examine how well (or poorly) the public is informed about important medical issues through the popular media and compare this to what is published in the scientific literature. We will further examine the biological basis of these topics and discuss why they are important to us and future generations. This course will emphasize the importance of becoming informed and not just accepting what the media tells us. Does not carry major credit. Not open to Biology majors.

BSC 125 . Ethnobotany: The Plants People Use (3).

This course examines plants and their biology, focusing on those used by people. Ethnobotany studies the use of plants in indigenous societies, but also fosters awareness of plants used by industrialized cultures and plants of historical importance. Fundamental scientific and botanical concepts advance an understanding of diet, herbal medicines, plant products in manufacturing, biotechnology and conservation biology. Three hours of lecture per week. Does not carry biology major credit.

BSC 127 (ESS 127). Global Environment-Galapagos (3).

The Galapagos islands are a geologically and ecologically unique environment that also occupy a significant place in the history of biological science. This course will examine the geological and ecological processes that have shaped this fragile environment and its inhabitants. Additionally, significant attention will be devoted to the role the islands played in the development of evolutionary theory. Does not carry biology major credit.

BSC 128 (ESS 128). Global Ecosystems: Costa Rica (3).

Understanding the function of ecosystems around the world, particularly those that exist within a sensitive climatic balance, is important for all students. This introductory course offers students the opportunity to study the fundamentals of evolution, ecology and earth science culminating in a two-week field experience in Costa Rica. Students will explore the principles of scientific investigation; comparisons of floral and faunal diversity in high-altitude (cloud) versus low-altitude (rain) forests; comparisons of highland and lowland soils; types of volcanic activity in an active volcanic arc; effects of volcanic activity on ecological diversity and soil formation; and operation of coastal processes on a geologically young coastline. Lectures, readings and discussions will be conducted at Le Moyne as well as at the field sites. Satisfies core science requirement. Additional fees will be required for this course. Does not carry biology major credit.

BSC 129 (ESS 129). Global Ecosystems: North America (3).

This introductory level field course will offer students the opportunity to study the fundamentals of ecosystem and earth science, with specific reference to North America. This study will involve travel for two weekends in the Adirondacks and for an extended weekend to northern Arizona. Field-based learning activities will examine the geological and ecological processes that determine the structure and function of these two systems. Does not carry Biology major credit. Satisfies Core science requirement.

BSC 135 . Bodyworks: The Human Body (3).

This one semester course provides a study of the human body from combined anatomical and physiological perspectives. This course will include a "hands on" experiential component in order for students to engage in the scientific process. Such activities as measurement of physiological responses, and study of both dissected specimens and three dimensional models of human organ systems will enhance student learning. Does not carry biology major credit. Satisfies NAT SCI 1 requirement.

BSC 201 . Human Anatomy & Physiology I (4).

This course is the first in a two-semester sequence providing a study of anatomy and physiology in the human body. Initial portions of the course will include terminology, cell biology, biological chemistry, and tissues. Body systems covered include the skeletal, muscle, nervous, and integumentary. The cat is the primary dissection specimen in the laboratory. Dissection required. Pre-requisites: none. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Does not carry biology major credit.

BSC 202 . Human Anatomy & Physiology II (4).

This course is the second in a two-semester sequence providing a study of anatomy and physiology in the human body. Topics covered include the special senses, and the endocrine, circulatory, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Dissection required. Pre-requisites: a grade of C or better in BSC 201. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Does not carry biology major credit.

BSC 205 . Basic Microbiology (4).

This course is a survey of microbial life with special emphasis on those organisms of clinical interest. Laboratory exercises emphasize the isolation, identification and control of microorganisms. Three hours of lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite or corequisite: BSC 201, 202. Does not carry biology major credit.

BSC 340 (PSY 340). Brain and Behavior (3).

A study of the relationship of the brain and body to behavior. Emphasis is on the central nervous system. Topics include neuroanatomy, neural cell processes, hemispheric functions, hormonal regulation of behavior, physiological mechanisms involved in attention, arousal and sleep, and the neural bases of emotions learning and memory and psychological disorders. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or permission of the instructor. Does not carry biology major credit.

BSC 345 . Pathophysiology (3).

This course is a comprehensive coverage of the basic pathophysiological mechanisms and specific diseases and disorders affecting all of the major organ systems of the human body. The concepts of pathophysiology, especially for the most commonly encountered diseases and disorders, are covered in detail, including such topics as genetics/heredity, immune system problems, inflammation and infection, endocrinology, and malignant processes. The etiology and progression of disease and disorder states are examined from the micro (cellular) and macro (organ) level. Prerequisites: BSC 201, BSC 202 and BSC 205. Does not carry biology major credit.Registration for this course is limited to nursing majors, except by permission from the Chair of Nursing.

BSC 346 . Phys Chg & Care Giv/ Wellness in Aging (3).

This course will assist students to advise elders and their families with decisions related to lifestyle as the physical changes of aging become prominent forces in maintaining independence. The course content and activities will introduce the students to normal adult anatomy and physiology and the changes associated with aging. A body systems approach will be used to discuss age related changes in physical structure and function and the associated environmental and lifestyle practices that can support a healthy aging process. This course does not carry biology major credit.

BSC 435 (NSG 535). Epidemiology (3).

Epidemiological principles and methods are presented with emphasis on the health status and health needs of a population, on levels of prevention, on susceptibility, communicability, and modes of transmission, and on promotion of health using various strategies. Statistical measures are applied to describe the incidence and prevalence of disease, fertility rates, morbidity and mortality rates, health beliefs and behaviors, socioeconomic, ethnic and racial disparities, causality of disease and disability, and risk factors for the purpose of evidence-based decision making in public health. Prerequisites or corequisites: BSC 201 and BSC 202 or equivalent; BSC 205 or BSC 325; MTH 110 or MTH 111; a research methods course such as NSG 350 or PSY/SOC/CJS 201 or PSC 202, BIO 499 or by permission of the chair. Does not carry biology major credit. Registration for this course is limited to nursing majors, except by permission from the Chair of Nursing.

ESS 121 . Global Resources (3).

Resources can be thought of as anything that an organism needs for survival. While this holds true for all life forms, in this class we will focus primarily on humans and human societies. The consumption of resources often results in a struggle for survival and this competition manifests itself at many levels, from the town and region (which tribes and ethnic groups have access to the best land and water supply); to the nation (control of the nation's oil, water, mines), and to the world at large. Does not carry biology major credit.

ESS 127 (BSC 127). Global Environment-Galapagos (3).

The Galapagos islands are a geologically and ecologically unique environment that also occupy a significant place in the history of biological science. This course will examine the geological and ecological processes that have shaped this fragile environment and its inhabitants. Additionally, significant attention will be devoted to the role the islands played in the development of evolutionary theory. Additional fees will be required for this course. Does not carry biology major credit.

ESS 128 (BSC 128). Global Ecosystems: Costa Rica (3).

Understanding the function of ecosystems around the world, particularly those that exist within a sensitive climatic balance, is important for all studnets. This introductory course offers students the opportunity to study the fundamentals of evolution, ecology and earth science culminating in a two-week field experience in Costa Rica. Students will explore the principles of scientific investigation; comparisons of floral and faunal diversity in high-altitude (cloud) versus low-altitude (rain) forests; comparisons of highland and lowland soils; types of volcanic activity in an active volcanic arc; effects of volcanic activity on ecological diversity and soil formation; and operation of coastal processes on a geologically young coastline. Lectures, readings and discussions will be conducted at Le Moyne as well as at the field sites. Satisfies core science requirement. Additional fees will be required for this course. Does not carry biology major credit.

ESS 129 (BSC 129). Global Ecosystems: North America (3).

This introductory level field course will offer students the opportunity to study the fundamentals of ecosystem and earth science, with specific reference to North America. This study will involve travel for two weekends in the Adirondacks and for an extended weekend to northern Arizona. Field-based learning activities will examine the geological and ecological processes that determine the structure and function of these two systems. Does not carry Biology major credit. Satisfies core science requirement. Additional fees will be required for this course. Does not carry biology major credit.

ESS 205 . Physical Geology (4).

Physical Geology is an introduction to the study of the composition of the Earth and the processes that operate internally and at the surface. Students are introduced to basic geological concepts including plate tectonics, volcanoes, earthquakes, geologic time, types of rocks that form the crust and how they form, and surficial processes. Three hours lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Does not carry biology major credit.

ESS 205L . Physical Geology Lab ().

ESS 238 . History of Earth and Its Inhabitants (4).

This course utilizes readings, lectures, laboratory activities and field trips to examine the physical changes that have occurred on the surface of our planet and the history of life on earth. Key concepts include the tectonic evolution of North America and the fossil record of evolution, with emphasis on the geologic history of the New York region. Some travel may occur on weekends. Prerequisites: BSC/ESS 127, 128, 129 or ESS 208 or permission of instructor. Does not carry biology major credit.

ESS 250 . Water Resources (4).

This course shows the variety of ways that water impacts on the natural and man-made worlds. One of the original four 'elements', water is becoming more vital than ever, as a consequence of the continuing increases in human population, pollution, and changes in climate. The course explores the ancient concept of the water cycle in a modern context to give an appreciation of the importance of water and water quality to plants, animals and humans. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week. Carries ESS major credit.Prerequisites: CHM 151 and CHM 152. Recommended: ESS 205. Does not carry biology major credit.

ESS 260 (ENS 260). Sustainability: Ecological Entrepreneurship (3).

The concept and practice of Sustainable Growth and Development have generated increasing concern over the past four decades. Recently, due to a heightened focus on climate change, ecological damage, rising inequalities of resource distribution, etc., even more attention and effort have been directed toward the concept of Sustainability. This course explores the connections among science, technology, products, and markets in the service of society, (emphasizing that none of these forces works in a vacuum), in order to study the many aspects of sutainability. Students are encouraged to be entrepreneurs of sustainability, acting to find a balance among social, ecological, and economic needs. Course satifies core natural science requirement. Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor. Does not carry biology major credit.

ESS 265 (BIO 265). Intro to Geographic Info Systems (3).

This course is designed to introduce students to Geographic Information Systems (GIS), a set of hardware, software, and methods for the capture, storage, management, manipulations, analysis, modeling, and display of geographic information. This course will provide an introduction to GIS application and analysis. Course work will emphasize use of industry standard software. Two hours lecture, two hours lab per week. Carries BIO and ESS major credit.

ESS 320 . Earth's Surface (4).

This course describes the interaction of sedimentary, hydrologic, and biologic processes at the surface of the Earth, with particular attention to the role of organisms and climate on the formation and erosion of soils. Topics will include sedimentary processes, landforms, surficial hydrology, pedogenesis, fluvial and glacial processes and landforms. Significant fieldwork and mapping applications will be a part of this course. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week are required. Prerequisites: NSS 205 or permission. Does not carry biology major credit.

ESS 335 (BIO 335). Biodiversity (3).

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the phenomenal diversity of life with which we share this planet. To do this we will refresh the students146 memories concerning evolution and the various mechanisms through which communities of life forms have become adapted to their environment. We will spend some time with taxonomy and biogeography before we can begin to examine the current state of biodiversity as well as future trends. The implications of these trends will signal a stopping point for the course but will hopefully serve as a beginning for the student as they move away from Le Moyne and take a place in society. Prerequisites: Minimum of 10 BIO/NSS credits.

ESS 340 (CHM 340). Environmental Chemistry (3).

The focus of this course is on understanding the underlying chemical principles and reactions of natural systems and anthropogenic compounds in the environment. Topics such as chemistry of the atmosphere, aqueous media, pollutants and energy sources will be covered. The emphasis of the course is on chemical aspects of environmental science, so a general background in chemistry is a prerequisite. Does not carry biology major credit. Prerequisites: CHM 223.

ESS 340L (CHM 340L). Environmental Chemistry Laboratory (1).

This is an optional laboratory course that further explores topics covered in the lecture course. The lecture course (NSS 340) may be taken with or without this lab course (NSS 340L). Emphasis is on analytical methods, green chemistry techniques and investigation of materials. Three hours laboratory each week.

ESS 348 (BIO 348). Environ Research in the Field: Iceland (4).

The environment of Iceland is shaped by the immensely dynamic geologic processes of active volcanoes and glaciers, but this environment is also deceptively fragile and subject to anthropogenic influence. The present landscape has resulted from this interaction of human and natural processes. A semester of classroom activity culminates in a field session where students conduct research on the processes of environmental change in Iceland.

ESS 390 (BIO 390). Independent Study in Bio & Natural Syst (1-3).

A student may pursue a semester or more of independent study in a specialized area of biology of mutual interest to the student and one or more members of the faculty in the department. This course is for the aboveaverage student whose interests and abilities go farther than normal course offerings. Proposals, indicating credit sought, must have approval prior to registration. Prerequisites or corequisites: 15 credit hours in biology in addition to B10 380. Carries biology major credit for the tenth biology course.

ESS 458 (BIO 458). Global Climate Systems (3).

In this class, students will come to recognize that Earth's biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere operate in complexly linked systems in which various components are exchanged over greatly varying time scales. Using laboratory and field studies, students will measure, discuss and define the impact of global change on natural systems. Prerequisites: Chm151/152 and a minimum of 15 credits of BIO, including at least one course in the Ecology/Population Biology Area.

ESS 470 (BIO 470/PSC 470). Seminar: Environmental Topics (3).

This advanced seminar provides students with the opportunity to explore the complexity of environmental issues in detail. By choosing current topics and analyzing the scientific and socio-economic factors underlying environmental problems, students will develop greater awareness and understanding of society's ability to mitigate these problems. Does not carry biology major credit. This course places a high emphasis on oral and written presentation skills.

ESS 490 . Internship in Environmental Science (1-3).

Students gain real-world experience in the application of the principles of environmental professionals in industry, academia or nongovernmental organizations. Students may take an active role in identifying potential internship opportunities, but actual experiences must be approved for academic credit by supervising faculty. Minimum three hours per week of approved experiences for each hour of credit. Counts as major elective for ESS. Does not carry biology major credit.

ESS 499 (BIO 499). Research in Bio & Environmental Systems (3).

The student conducts a laboratory or field investigation under the guidance of the faculty in the department. Proposals, indicating credits sought, must have approval prior to registration. Written research report and oral public presentation of the research are required. prerequisites and coreguisites: 15 credit hours in environmental science or biology in addition to BIO 380. For biology majors, three credits of BIO 499 carries credit for the 10th biology course. For ESS majors, three credits of ESS 499 is required for graduation.

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