Political Science

Chair: Delia Popescu
Associate Professor(s): Matthew Loveland, Delia Popescu
Assistant Professor(s): Jonathan Parent
Adjunct(s): Anirban Acharya, Mary Ellen Mangino, James T. Snyder


The Department of Political Science has as its main objective educating students to the political concerns of society. The coursework covers the wide range of topics associated with the discipline, and provides solid preparation for such career choices as graduate school, law school, business, journalism, education and public service. To facilitate academic focus the department offers five tracks (Pre-Law, Public Service, International Relations/Comparative Politics, General Study and Education). Whatever career path is chosen, however, the department’s primary mission is to prepare students for a life of active and informed citizenship.

Students majoring in political science must choose a track with the advice and consent of the departmental advisor. Each of the department's five tracks provides rigorous training with emphasis on the skills needed to prepare for careers or post-graduate education. The Pre-Law track offers students a well-rounded curriculum focused on critical thinking and analytical skills for law school or for graduate work related to the academic study of law. The Public Service track prepares students for careers at all levels of public administration and policy making. The International Relations/Comparative Politics track offers training in the dynamic issues of international affairs and prepares students for careers in diplomacy, foreign service, international organizations and any other careers that requires knowledge of international issues. The General Studies track is intended for student who would like to tailor their studies in political science and create a unique academic program (for example, students can choose to focus on environmental politics, on political communications, or on politics and theater. The fit track offers students in Education an opportunity to chose political science as an area of major focus.

In keeping with Le Moyne’s Jesuit heritage and our nation’s democratic creed, the faculty of the department is committed in our various courses, classes and pedagogical methods to the following goals: (1) development of critical thinking skills, (2) growth in values awareness, (3) development of decision-making skills, (4) sensitizing students to the role of power and the pervasiveness of politics, (5) development of political skills and (6) the combined use of these skills for possible future public service, whether local, state, national or international. As part of our commitment to these objectives, the department requires that majors complete one of the following practical experiences: Two one-credit service learning courses, an internship, a study abroad experience or any similar practical experience to be decided in consultation with the department chair (for a minimum of two credit hours). These experiences are designed to link the students’ academic learning with real world experiences of citizenship.

Political Science Major

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

Pre-Law Specialization

Major RequirementsHours
PSC 101 American National Politics 3
PSC 201 The Scope of Political Science 3
PSC 202 Methods of Political Science 3
PSC 205 Introduction to Legal Studies 3
PSC 207 Power and Justice 3
Political Science Electives 6
Internship, Service Learning or Study Abroad 2
One of the following: 3
PSC 303 Democracy and Its Critics3
PSC 367 War, Peace and Violence3
PSC 325 Conservatism in America3
One of the following: 3
PSC 451 American Constitutional Law I3
PSC 452 American Constitutional Law II3
PSC 324 Congress3
Two of the following: 6
PSC 243 Law and Politics3
PSC 301 The U.S. Supreme Court3
PSC 362 International Law3
PSC 405 International Human Rights3
Major SupportHours
MTH 111 Introduction to Statistics I (with Computer Lab) **satisfies core math requirement4
One of the following: 3
HST 211 American History Survey I3
HST 212 American History Survey II3
HST 316 History of American Law3
One of the following: 3
PHL 310 Informal Logic3
PHL 311 Introduction to Formal Logic3
PHL 312 Symbolic Logic3
PHL 362 Theory of Knowledge3
PHL 363 Analytic Philosophy3
LAW 200 or 300 level 3
Two of the following: 6
PHL 350 Philosophy of Law3
PSY 335 Psychology and the Law3
SOC 321 Law, Society and Social Science3
ENG 395 Nonfiction Writing Workshop * or ENG 397 Writing Nonfiction3

*Must be of legal content. See your advisor for more information. Not offered every year.

Public Service Specialization

Major RequirementsHours
PSC 101 American National Politics 3
PSC 201 The Scope of Political Science 3
PSC 202 Methods of Political Science 3
PSC 207 Power and Justice 3
PSC Elective 3
Internship, Service Learning or Study Abroad 2
One of the following: 3
PSC 105 Comparative Politics3
PSC 375 The New Europe: Central & Eastern Europe3
One of the following: 3
PSC 303 Democracy and Its Critics3
PSC 325 Conservatism in America3
Three of the following: 9
PSC 221 State Government and Politics3
PSC 223 The Presidency3
PSC 322 Urban Politics3
PSC 331 Introduction to Public Administration3
PSC 332 Public Policy3
PSC 344 Immigration3
PSC 324 Congress3
PSC 345 Government and Business3
Major SupportHours
MTH 111 Introduction to Statistics I (with Computer Lab) **satisfies core math requirement4
ECO 113 Principles of Microeconomics 3
ECO 114 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
HST 212 American History Survey II 3
One of the following: 3
ECO 205 Economics of Public Policy Analysis3
ECO 335 Economics of Poverty3
HRM 301 Human Resource Management3
One of the following: MTH 112, CSC Elective or two EAC/language courses 6

International Relations/Comparative Politics Specialization

Major RequirementsHours
PSC 105 Comparative Politics 3
PSC 201 The Scope of Political Science 3
PSC 202 Methods of Political Science 3
PSC 207 Power and Justice 3
PSC Elective 3
Internship, Service Learning or Study Abroad 2
Five of the following: 15
PSC 261 International Politics3
PSC 303 Democracy and Its Critics3
PSC 362 International Law3
PSC 363 U.S. Foreign Policy3
PSC 367 War, Peace and Violence3
PSC 375 The New Europe: Central & Eastern Europe3
PSC 366 Globalization: the Politics of International Economic Relations3
PSC 405 International Human Rights3
Major SupportHours
MTH 111 Introduction to Statistics I (with Computer Lab) **satisfies core math requirement4
ANT Elective or ECO Elective 3
PHL Elective, REL Elective or EAC 3
Two HST 300 Electives (EAC) 6

General Study Specialization

Major RequirementsHours
PSC 101 American National Politics 3
PSC 201 The Scope of Political Science 3
PSC 202 Methods of Political Science 3
Political Science Electives 21
Internship, Service Learning or Study Abroad 2
Major SupportHours
MTH 111 Introduction to Statistics I (with Computer Lab) **satisfies core math requirement4
Social Science (sociology, anthropology, criminal justice, psychology, economics, education)9
HST 211 American History Survey I 3
HST 212 American History Survey II 3
Foreign Language** 6
Free Electives 24

**Political science majors are required either to take two semesters of the same language at the introductory or intermediate level or to complete one course past the intermediate level.

Typical Program for Pre-Law Specialization

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
PSC 1013 PSC 2073
WRT 1013 MTH 1114
HST 1103 HST 1113
COR 1003 PHL 1103
EAC3 EAC3
Sophomore Year
PSC 2013 PSC 2023
LGS 2013 PSC 243/301/362/405 3
Natural Science3 PHL 2103
Social Science3
HST Elective3
Junior Year
Social Science3 PSC Elective3
PSC 451/452/3243 Free Elective3
PSC 243/301/362/4053 PHL Elective3
PSY Elective3 PSC 303/367/3253
ENG 3103 LAW Elective3
Senior Year
PSC Elective3 Intern/Srv Learning2
COR 400A3 Free Elective3
ENG Elective3 Free Elective3
SOC Elective3 Free Elective3
Theology3

Typical Program for Public Service Specialization

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
PSC 1013 PSC 2073
WRT 1013 MTH 1114
HST 1103 HST 1113
COR 1003 PHL 1103
EAC3 EAC3
Sophomore Year
PSC 2013 PSC 2023
PSC 221/2233 PSC 322/324/3443
Natural Science3 PHL 2103
ENG 2103 Social Science3
Theology3 MTH 1123
Junior Year
Social Science3 CSC or Foreign Language3
PSC 105/PSC 3753 PSC Elective3
History Elective3 HST 2123
ECO 1133 ECO 1143
ENG 3103 Free Elective3
Senior Year
COR 400A3 Intern/Srv Learning3
PSC 331/332/3453
PSC Elective3
ECO 205/HRM 3013
Theology3

Typical Program for International Relations/Comparative Politics Specialization

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
PSC 1053 PSC 2073
WRT 1013 MTH 1114
HST 1103 HST 1113
COR 1003 PHL 1103
EAC3 EAC3
Sophomore Year
PSC 2013 PSC 2023
PSC 2613 PSC 362/PSC 4053
Natural Science3 PHL 2103
ENG 2103 Social Science3
Theology3 EAC3
Junior Year
Social Science3 PSC 3673
PSC 366/PSC 3633 PSC Elective3
History Elective3 PHL/REL/ENG Elective3
EAC3 ANT/ECO Elective3
ENG 3103 Free Elective3
Senior Year
COR 400A3 Intern/Srv Learn/Stud Ab3
PSC 3753
PSC Elective3
History Elective3
Theology3

Typical Program for General Study Specialization

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
HST 1103 HST 1113
EAC3 EAC3
Social Science3 Natural Science3
PSC 1013 PSC Elective3
Sophomore Year
ENG 2103 Theology3
PHL 2103 Social Science3
MTH 1114 PSC Elective3
PSC 2013 PSC 2023
Elective3 Elective3
Junior Year
ENG 3103 Elective3
PHL 3013 HST 2123
HST 2113 PSC Elective3
Elective3 PSC Elective3
PSC Elective3 Service Learning1
Service Learning1
Senior Year
COR 400A3 PSC Elective3
Social Science3 Elective3
PSC Elective3 Elective3
Elective3
Elective3

Double Majors

Political Science can be paired with a variety of other majors for a double major, including: history, peace and global studies, theatre.

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

Double Major in Political Science and History

Major RequirementsHours
HST 211 American History Survey I 3
HST 212 American History Survey II 3
HST 301 Methods of Historical Research 3
HST 302 Historical Research and Writing 3
HST Electives 18
Internship, Service Learning or Study Abroad* 2
PSC 101 American National Politics 3
PSC 201 The Scope of Political Science 3
PSC 202 Methods of Political Science 3
PSC Electives* 21
Major SupportHours
MTH 111 Introduction to Statistics I (with Computer Lab) 4
Foreign Language 6
Social Science courses (other than PSC)6
Free Electives 3-9

(Depends on how many cross-listed HST/PSC courses are taken.)

* Two cross-listed HST/PSC courses may be double-counted for both the HST and PSC major requirement credits, lowering the total major credit count from 62 to 56.

Double Major in Political Science and Peace and Global Studies

Major RequirementsHours
Capstone Course 3
Capstone Experience** 3
Electives - Regional* 9
Electives - Thematic* 9
Foreign Language 18
Free Electives*** 17
PGS 101 Introduction to Anthropology 3
PGS 201 Introduction to Peace & Global Studies 3
PSC 201 The Scope of Political Science 3
PSC 202 Methods of Political Science 3
PSC Electives (300 or higher)6
Social Science (fulfilled by major requirements)
Statistics 4

* Twelve of the 18 credit hours should be courses with PGS/PSC cross listing.

** normally fulfilled by study abroad experience.

***students are urged to fulfill the extra two credit hours through participation in service leaning courses.

Double Major in Political Science and Theatre

Major RequirementsHours
PSC 101 American National Politics or PSC 105 Intro to Comp Gov3
PSC 201 The Scope of Political Science 3
PSC 202 Methods of Political Science 3
One of the following: 3
THR 203 Voice and Movement3
CMM 201 Fundamentals of Speech3
THR 105 Introduction to Theatre 3
THR 110 Stagecraft 3
THR 205 Acting I 3
THR 210 Fundamentals of Design for Theatre 3
THR 260 Theatre Practicum (must take 3 credits total)1
THR 302 The Western Drama Tradition 3
THR 440 Theatre Context 4
THR/ENG Dramatic Lit 3
Major SupportHours
MTH 111 Introduction to Statistics I (with Computer Lab) 4
Foreign Language (fulfills core EAC requirement) 6
Internship, Service Learning or Study Abroad 2
ElectivesHours
Theatre Arts Electives 9
Social Science Electives 9
Political Science Electives 21

B.A. in Political Science with Teacher Certification

Please refer to the Department of Education section for details or contact the chair of the department of political science.

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

Political Science Minor

A political science minor is recommended for students who major in another field (e.g. business, accounting, etc.) but wish to broaden their career possibilities. For a minor in political science, 15 semester hours of political science courses, including American National Politics (PSC 101), are required.

Legal Studies Minor

Legal Studies focuses on law as a social phenomenon, and legal systems as both cultural systems and institutional systems. Much of jurisprudential theory identifies justice both as the first value of law and as the standard against which legal systems are to be judged. Within this framework, special attention is focused on the role of law in the lives of society’s least advantaged populations. Consistent both with this understanding of justice and with the College’s mission of education for social justice, engaged citizenship and service in the interests of the disadvantaged, the legal studies minor will emphasize problem-solving, values identification and critical thinking skills.

Although housed within the political science department, the legal studies minor is an interdisciplinary course of study composed of five courses. It is designed for both law school-bound students and those who want to gain a credential that complements their major and future careers.

See the full program here.

Courses


PSC 100 (CJS 100). Contemp Issues Amer Politics (3).

A study of several important issues in contemporary American society and of the manner in which they are being handled by our political system. Among the issues covered are: the energy crisis, nuclear energy, toxic wastes, inflation, recession, government spending, crime, military spending, the arms race and the new religious right. This course does not fulfill requirements for a major in political science; it will carry credit toward a minor.Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Diversity (DIV).

PSC 101 . American National Politics (3).

A study of the institutions, culture, ideologies and political processes that go into the making of government and politics in the United States on the national level. A one-credit service learning experience may be offered in conjunction for non-majors. This course, and the service learning experience integrated into it, are required of all Political Science majors.

PSC 105 (PGS 105). Comparative Politics (3).

This course will introduce you to the comparative analysis of governments, political movements, institutions, cultures, and ideologies around the world. The course will comparatively address a variety of cases including the UK, France, Brazil, Iran, China, Russia, India, Nigeria, and the U.S. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): DIV.

PSC 201 . The Scope of Political Science (3).

An introduction to the philosophy and methodology of the scientific study of politics. A survey of the various approaches to political science and their utility. Required of all Political Science majors.

PSC 202 (SOC 201/CJS 201). Methods of Political Science (3).

First semester: an introduction to the philosophy and methodology of the scientific study of politics. A survey of the various approaches to political science and their utility. Second semester: research methodology, the analysis of political data, survey research methods. Required of all Political Science majors. Prerequisites: ANT 101, ANT 102, SOC 101, CJS 101 or PSC 101 and MTH 111.

PSC 203 . Public Opinion, Political Behavior, and Policy (3).

Politicians and members of the media often refer to public opinion when discussing policy options and political strategy. Scholars study public opinion as a way to describe and explain political behavior, social divisions, and policy debates. But what is 'public opinion' and does it affect policy decisions, voting, or activism? This course surveys classical and contemporary scholarly approaches to theorizing and measuring public opinion, as well as the role of 'public opinion' in the framing of political debate, political action,and the formation of public policy.

PSC 205 (LGS 201). Introduction to Legal Studies (3).

An introduction to the American legal system: its processes, institutions, actors, objectives, values, and impact. We will investigate how law affects not only society but also how it affects the attitudes and actions of individuals in everyday life. To study this, an interdisciplinary approach is adopted and theories that range from the mainstream to the critical will be examined. This course is required for the LGS minor.

PSC 207 . Power and Justice (3).

What is power? How do we know when power is exercised unjustly? This introductory course in political theory examines classic texts in political theory that explore three interrelated themes: The mechanisms of power, odentity, and resistance. The aim of the course is to clarify: the mechanisms of power, how individuals function within these power structures and how they can resist unjust power. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Diversity (DIV).

PSC 221 . State Government and Politics (3).

This course examines the role of the states in the U.S. political system, with special emphasis on New York State government's institutions, political processes and public policies. The evolving nature of federalism and intergovernmental relations is covered, as are specific areas of state policy: education, enviroment, criminal justice, welfare, healthcare and economic development. A field trip to Albany focusing on a current controversy in state politics is a required part of the course.

PSC 223 . The Presidency (3).

A study of the legal and political powers and responsibilities of the presidency, especially as influenced by trends in national and international life. The task of chief executive receives major attention.

PSC 230 (LGS 230). Legal Research and Writing (3).

An introduction to the skills of legal analysis, legal research, and legal writing. The course will focus on building a basic legal vocabulary, issue recognition, effective organization, clear writing, and proper legal citation. Students will also have an opportunity to strengthen their speaking skills by participating in oral arguments. These skills form the essential building blocks of critical and logical thinking, and will serve any student interested in pursuing legal studeies, advancing their undergraduate education, entering graduate school, or working in science or business.

PSC 243 (LGS 243). Law and Politics (3).

A study of the relationship between legal and political norms, actors and institutions. Through analysis of contemporary controversies the following questions are examined: How is law political? Can or should judging be value free? What are the alternatives to going to court? What values does the legal system maintain? Can law change an unwilling society? Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS).

PSC 261 (PGS 261). International Politics (3).

A survey of some major problems associated with international politics. Special attention is given to the study of nationalism, the nation-state, international organization (especially the United Nations), and the comparative foreign policies of selected nations. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Diversity (DIV).

PSC 301 (LGS 301). The U.S. Supreme Court (3).

An examination of the personalities, politics, processes, decision-making and impact of the United States Supreme Court.

PSC 303 (PGS 303). Democracy and Its Critics (3).

The term "democracy" has become synonymous with legitimate rule. But what kind of democracy is the true fountain of legitimacy? What type of institutions are best fitted for instituting democracy? What are the conditions without which democracy cannot survive? Who is included in the phrase "we, the people"? Are democratic regimes more viable in homogenous or heterogeneous societies? Can democracy be tyrannical? This course investigates historical and contemporary controversies that reflect various challenges to democracy, the forms of actual democratic politics, and the meaning of "democracy" as a concept. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS) and Diversity (DIV).

PSC 310 . US Diplomatic Hst Since 1900 (3).

Emphasis is on the rise of the United States to world power and on its diplomacy before, during and after the two world wars. May be taken for history or political science credit.

PSC 312 (GWS 312/HST 344). Women and Politics (3).

The goal of this course is to make women visible and their voices audible in the study of American politics. "Politics" is broadly construed to include the politics of everyday life as well as that of national institutions. While gender politics is stressed, we will also study how race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, religion, disability and age affect a person's place and role in American society, culture and politics. Fulfills Core requirement(s): DIV.

PSC 314 (REL 314). Church and State in the United States (3).

An overview of church-state relations from colonial times to the present. It includes: judicial decisions on the establishment of religion and the freedom of religious practice; the power of religious groups in the political process; churchstate relationships in other nations.

PSC 320 (PHL 366). The Self, Society, and Justice (3).

The self is one of the most familiar and yet most mysterious of concepts. We take for granted the idea that we have or are a self, and we regularly and comfortably refer to selves. But what is the self? And what are the moral and political implications for how we understand justice and the self? This course explores the nature of the self through philosophical and social scientific lenses. We will consider classic philosophical and social scientific discussions of the self, as well as the ways in which these disciplines can challenge, enrich, and play off of each other. Prerequisites: PHL 110. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS).

PSC 322 . Urban Politics (3).

A study of the effects on the government and politics of urban areas due to the trends that have made America predominantly urbanized. Questions treated include the political effects of population changes, metropolitan governmental structures and the federal system's dynamics concerning urban areas.

PSC 324 . Congress (3).

Congress, its structure and processes, is the prime focus, but similarities to other legislative systems are examined. The relationship between individual and institutional goals is studied as it is influenced by political demands and opportunities.

PSC 325 . Conservatism in America (3).

What is conservative political thought? Is there such a thing as a coherent conservative political philosophy? This course examines classic conservative texts with a focus on the principles that established its foundations. The course follows the intellectual evolution of the conservative tradition in both Europe and America. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Diversity (DIV).

PSC 329 (HST 329/PGS 329/GWS 329). History of Latin Amer Social Movements (3).

Will examine peaceful Latin American social change movements in historical and global context. The civil components of violent revolutions will be examined along with peaceful social movements that confronted ruthless dictatorships across Latin America, energizing democracy and expanding ethnic rights. The course will look at how these movements re-defined gender roles and placed the economic and environmentals concerns of the poor in the international spotlight. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Diversity (DIV) and Cultural Elective (CE).

PSC 331 . Introduction to Public Administration (3).

The history, background and terminology of the administrative process; the function of the administrator; the theory of organization and its practice; personnel administration; financial administration and the budgetary process; administrative law; traditional branches of government as they relate to administration; current trends and problems.

PSC 332 . Public Policy (3).

An examination of the public policy making process with emphasis on policy planning, decision making, policy impact and policy evaluation. Focuses on specific program areas such as education, the environment, health care, crime and punishment. A one-credit integrated service learning experience may be offered with this course.

PSC 333 . Environmental Politics (3).

A study of the political institutions, actors, laws and policies affecting the environment. The course deals with value choices underlying public policies in areas such as air and water pollution, waste disposal, and ozone depletion. The course examines how such policies are made and implemented, as well as what actions, both individual and collective, can be taken to alleviate such problems.

PSC 334 (GWS 334/PGS 334). Social Activism (3).

An experiential and academic examination of social activism in the United States. The course first explores the meaning of citizenship and the role of activism in a democratic republic. It then focuses on how activism is done by analyzing various social movements and the impact they have had on citizenship, public policy and social change. Fulfills Core Requirement(s):Diversity (DIV)and Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS).

PSC 340 . Science Technology and Society (3).

The interdisciplinary study of science and technology. This course explores the relationship between science and technology on the one hand and politics, culture, economics and society on the other. The role of government, the responsibilities of citizenship and the process of making science and technology policy are covered. Special emphasis is placed on cases from the fields of biotechnology and medicine.

PSC 344 (CJS 343/SOC 343/PGS 344). Immigration (3).

This course examines the topic of immigration from multiple perpectives: historical comparison between current and previous waves of immigrants, politcal debates over what we should do locally and nationally, the complex economic and social impacts of immigrants(both legal and unauthorized), the changing legal environment, comparative immigration policies, and the post-9/11 national security implications of immigration. This course aims to have you explore and challenge your own views, try to make sense of completing arguments and evidence, and gain a respect for perspectives not your own. A visit to the National Immigration Museum at Ellis Island is planned. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Diversity (DIV).

PSC 345 . Government and Business (3).

This course explores the impact of business strategies and power on government decisions. It then focuses on government policies that influence business behavior. This topic addresses a central and timely question: What is the proper relationship between government and business that would best promote the culture's values and the public good?

PSC 351 . Political Parties (3).

An experiential and reflective study of the activity of the political parties, especially regarding elections, with some attention to the structure and functions of parties in different nations and their promotion of democratic participation.

PSC 353 (CMM 353). Government and the Mass Media (3).

The interaction between the United States government and the "Fourth Estate" will be studied through an examination of theoretical works, descriptive narratives, empirical studies and current events. Issues studied will include how the government attempts to control and regulate the media.

PSC 354 . Politics in Film (3).

An examination of the political messages and implications of contemporary films. This course examines both how films portray politicians and the political system, as well as the more subtle political messages embedded in films which have to do with socialization orientations toward power, authority, participation and the like.

PSC 359 (HST 359/PGS 369). Cold War & Global Upheaval,1964-Present (3).

An intensive study of the later years of the Cold War and the post-Cold War period. Continued Soviet and American rivalry combined with efforts to control the nuclear arms race, Third World "proxy wars" such as Vietnam and Afghanistan, the collapse of the Iron Curtain and end of the Soviet Union, global adjustments to the development of a unipolar world, the rise of terrorism and jihadist tendencies, social and cultural impacts. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Diversity (DIV).

PSC 362 (PGS 364/LGS 362). International Law (3).

The course will examine the theory and practice of International Law (IL) with reference to various events, which shaped the development of international law in all its forms (norms, rules, principles, precedent, custom, treaties etc). The course will emphasize current international legal norms and possibilities for future development. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Diversity (DIV).

PSC 363 (PGS 363). U.S. Foreign Policy (3).

This course will examine how the foreign policy of the United States is made. It will look at the sources of foreign policy, the factors which influence its formation, and the substance of past and present U.S. policies.

PSC 366 (PGS 366). Globalization: the Politics of International Economic Relations (3).

This course focuses on the power relationships behind contemporary international economic events. Among the issues that will be addressed: trade and protectionism, multinational corporations, international debt, the opening of investment markets in Eastern Europe and Western-Third World economic relations. The basic principles of macroeconomics and international finance will be covered. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Diversity (DIV).

PSC 367 (PGS 367). War, Peace and Violence (3).

This course will examine the theory and practice of the Just War doctrine. At the most general level, we will be concerned with the debate between realists, just war theorists and pacifists over the moral character of war. More specific topics include the justification of defensive, pre-emptive and preventive wars; humanitarian intervention; the combatant/noncombatant distinction; the distinction between direct and "collateral" harm to civilians; sieges, blockades and economic sanctions; guerrilla warfare; terrorism and reprisals; nuclear deterrence; and various religious conceptions of war and peace, especially those found in various Christian pacifist and Islamic traditions. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS).

PSC 375 (PGS 375). The New Europe: Central & Eastern Europe (3).

This course provides a comparative analysis of the political systems in Eastern Europe from 1945 to the present. The goal of this course is to provide students with a broad perspective on the changes that took place in Eastern Europe over the last century with an emphasis on the period around and after the 1989 revolutions. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS) and Diversity (DIV).

PSC 389 (HST 389/PGS 389). Opium, Empire and State in Asia (3).

Opium is an ancient medicine that became a mainstay for European traders in Asia and the keystone of their imperial economies. After opium opened Asian states to European influence it was established as an economic necessity for multi-national empires, emerging states, and insurgencies alike. This course looks at the political, economic, and social relations of opium in Asia and the world. It examines the connections between local production and global trade in the politics of native cultures, national governments, and international relations. At the end of the semester students will be able to look at today's headlines and understand their historical roots as well their future implications. Fulfills Core: Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS) and Cultural Elective (CE).

PSC 390 . Independent Study (1-3).

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration, a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure and number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair and the academic dean. It will be kept on file in the academic dean's office.

PSC 402 (SOC 402/ACT 402/ECO 402/IRL 403). Program Eval Research Methodol & Policy (3).

The goal of this course is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the use of behavioral science research methods and theories for program and intervention evaluations. Topics given special emphasis include: measurement strategies and problems, needs assessment, experimental and quasi-experimental field designs, qualitative methods, benefit-cost analysis, statistical approaches to modeling bias and the use of evaluation results in the policy process.

PSC 405 (PGS 405/GWS 405). International Human Rights (3).

This course will examine the development of human right in the international system. It will explore the content of the current international human right regime -the "blue" social and political rights and the "red" economic rights, as well as "green" rights to development, a clean environment, and peace. It will explore how rights develop and are propagated and will examine the role of governments, international organizations, and non-governmental organizations in the development of rights thinking. By way of illustration, it will examine the anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa and the expansion of women's rights over the last twenty years. A one-credit integrated service learning experience may be offered with this course. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Diversity (DIV).

PSC 407 (HST 375/PGS 407). Southern African Politics (3).

A study of political problems and dynamics in the region of Southern Africa. Focus is on the domestic politics of the Republic of South Africa, relations among the black-ruled states and between the blackruled states and South Africa, the role of external powers in the region and the conflict potential of contemporary problems.

PSC 417 (HST 417/PGS 417). African History (3).

This course introduces students to the development of African historiography. Students will interpret, analyze and critique different methodologies and have the opportunity to pursue their own specific research interests. In addition, this course will also examine the importance of the African oral tradition, European and Arabic travel literature, archeology and anthropology in the intellectual construction of Africa. This course is designed for upper-level history majors and other interested students and will fulfill the requirements of the senior core.

PSC 428 (ENG 428/THR 428). Politics and Literature (3).

Does literature reflect on the use of power, authority, ideology and identity? How does literature affect us and the way we interpret the political world? What makes theatre political? What hopes for changing the world does theatre dramatize? How does the theatre become a productive site for representing, and even enacting, political change? This course explores these questions by reading various literary works including a number of plays from different time periods. The encompassing question this course tries to answer (by analyzing the perspectives of different authors) is: What does it mean to have political freedom? Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Diversity (DIV) and Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS).

PSC 440-449 . Special Topics in Political Science (3).

Courses in this series offer an in-depth exploration of specific issues within the various sub-fields of political science as well as topics of current interest to instructor and students. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor.

PSC 448 . In Search of Community (3).

This course is designed to examine the significance and meaning of community in a variety of contexts and how people attempt to build it. We will examine competing definitions of community, consider the meaning of political communities, religious communities, urban and rural communities, counterfeit communities, virtual communities, and global communities. Particular attention will be given to examining the conditions that must be present in order to build the social capital needed to create genuine communities.

PSC 451 (LGS 451). American Constitutional Law I (3).

A study of selected problems in constitutional law with emphasis on areas of current concern. Material consists of case studies, selected articles, commentaries and judicial biographies. The Supreme Court is viewed as a social, economic and cultural force in our political system as well as a source and arbiter of law and order. The interaction of the court and interest groups is examined in connection with the development of constitutional law.

PSC 452 (LGS 452). American Constitutional Law II (3).

A study of selected problems in constitutional law with emphasis on areas of current concern. Material consists of case studies, selected articles, commentaries and judicial biographies. The Supreme Court is viewed as a social, economic and cultural force in our political system as well as a source and arbiter of law and order. The interaction of the court and interest groups is examined in connection with the development of constitutional law.

PSC 470 (BIO 470/ESS 470). Seminar: Environmental Topics (3).

This advanced seminar provides students with the opportunity to explore the complexity of environmental issues in detail. By choosing current topics and analyzing the scientific and socio-economic factors underlying environmental problems, students will develop greater awareness and understanding of society's ability to mitigate these problems. This course places a high emphasis on oral and written presentation skills.

PSC 480 . Service Learning (1).

Service Learning combines community service work with academic study and self-reflection. The experience, a commitment of 12-15 hours, must be taken in association with a credited Political Science course. Service Learning is intended to teach and promote an expanded idea of citizenship.

PSC 490 . Political Internship (3).

Participation in a field learning experience closely related to one of the areas of political science. The student intern will report as required to the faculty member assigned to supervise this field experience and is expected to evaluate the experience and relate it to his or her academic program. Three hours of field work per week will be required to generate one credit. Prerequisite: permission of the department chair. Does not count as political science elective hours toward a major or minor.

PSC 491 . Political Internship (6-9).

Participation in a field learning experience closely related to one of the areas of political science. The student intern will report as required to the faculty member assigned to supervise this field experience and is expected to evaluate the experience and relate it to his or her academic program. Three hours of field work per week will be required to generate one credit. Prerequisite: permission of the department chair. Does not count as political science elective hours toward a major or minor.

PSC 495 . Honors Project (3).

To qualify for an honors degree in political science, a student must be a declared political science major, have a OPA of at least 3.5 overall and 3.5 in political science, and complete an honors project. The project will consist of a research effort completed under the direction of a political science professor and presented to the department. A preliminary thesis, outline, methodology and bibliography must be approved by the professor before the student may register. (Normally taken in the first semester of the senior year and only with permission of the department chair).

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