Psychology

Chair: Brenda J. Kirby
Professor(s): Krystine I. Batcho, Vincent W. Hevern, S.J., Theresa White
Associate Professor(s): Maria Ditullio, Christina Michaelson, Susan L. Scharoun, Monica R. Sylvia, Shawn L. Ward
Adjunct(s): Eliza Bliss-Moreau, David M. Di Fabio, Colleen Gibbons, Kathleen A. Marjinsky, Barbara Bilinski Mettelman, Dominique Ricciardelli, Kay Scharoun, Mark Vinciquerra, Michele Vinciquerra


The major objective of the psychology department is to familiarize students with the basic methods and theories utilized to study the behavior of humans and animals. Through an offering of lecture, discussion, laboratory and field experiences, the department provides students with a comprehensive overview of the various approaches employed by psychologists while enabling individuals to pursue specific interests in greater depth.

Major Programs

The department offers four programs. One program leads to a bachelor of arts degree and is designed for students who wish to pursue a major in psychology that emphasizes general studies, or who wish to develop secondary concentrations, e.g., in one of the social sciences or in the business area. The second program leads to a bachelor of science degree and is designed for students who wish to pursue a major in psychology that emphasizes the natural sciences. This program is well-suited for those who want a dual major or minor in biology, chemistry or physics, or for those who intend to do graduate work in areas of psychology where a strong background in natural science is advantageous. The third program also leads to a bachelor of science degree and is designed for students who are seeking New York state teaching certification in child education (1-6). This degree program prepares students to teach in both special education and regular education settings. The fourth program is a dual major with psychology and theatre.

Psychology Major B.A.

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

Psychology Major B.A.

Major RequirementsHours
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology 3
PSY 201 Intro to Research Methods 4
PSY 340 Brain and Behavior 3
Psychology Electives (1) 21
Major SupportHours
MTH 110 Introduction to Statistics I (no Computer Lab) or MTH 1113
MTH 112 Introduction to Statistics II 3
Natural Science Elective 3
Social Science (2) 9
Free Electives (3)20-29

(1) At least 12 of these credits must be classroom rather than experiential courses. (See course descriptions to determine which courses are considered experiential.) At least one course must be chosen from the following group: PSY 401-449 or PSY 499.

(2) Sociology, anthropology, criminology, political science, economics, education; courses must be taken in at least two disciplines.

(3) 120 credits required to graduate

Typical Program for Psychology Major B.A.

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
COR 1003 Natural Science3
PSY 1013 EAC3
EAC3 PSY 2014
MTH 1103 MTH 1123
Sophomore Year
HST 1103 HST 1113
ENG 2103 PHL 2103
Theology3 Social Science3
PSY Elective3 PSY Elective3
Social Science3 Free Elective3
Junior Year
ENG 3103 PSY 3403
IDS3 Social Science3
PSY Elective3 PSY Elective3
PSY 490 (1)3 PSY 491 (1)3
Free Elective3 Free Elective3
Senior Year
Religion3 COR 400A3
PSY Senior Seminar3 PSY Elective3
Free Elective3 Free Elective3
Free Elective3 Free Elective3
Free Elective3 Free Elective3

(1) Must complete both semesters and must apply in the previous spring to register. Could also complete these in the FOURTH YEAR.

Must complete Core DIV and VPA requirement.

Psychology Major B.S.

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

Psychology Major B.S.

Major RequirementsHours
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology 3
PSY 201 Intro to Research Methods 4
PSY 340 Brain and Behavior 3
Psychology Electives (1) 21
Major SupportHours
MTH 110 Introduction to Statistics I (no Computer Lab) or MTH 1113
MTH 112 Introduction to Statistics II 3
Natural Science Electives (2) 15
Free Electives (3)17-26

(1) At least 12 of these credits must be classroom rather than experiential courses. (See course descriptions to determine which courses are considered experiential.) At least one course must be chosen from the following group: PSY 401-449 or PSY 499.

(2) Natural science electives may be selected from any courses offered by the biology, chemistry and physics departments. Science electives may be taken in only one discipline (e.g., they may all be in biology) or they may be taken in two or more disciplines (e.g., one in biology, one in chemistry and one in physics). Three credits of this requirement may be fulfilled with a MTH, CSC, or MIS course. The needs of each student will determine the exact distribution of electives in the natural sciences.

(3) 120 credits required to graduate

Typical Program for Psychology Major B.S.

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
COR 1003 Natural Science3
EAC3 EAC3
PSY 1013 PSY 2014
MTH 1103 MTH 1123
Sophomore Year
HST 1103 HST 1113
ENG 2103 Natural Science3
Theology3 PHL 2103
PSY Elective3 PSY Elective3
Natural Science3 Free Elective3
Junior Year
ENG 3103 PSY 3403
IDS3 Natural Science3
PSY 490 (1)3 PSY 491 (1)3
Free Elective3 Free Elective3
PSY Elective3 PSY Elective3
Senior Year
Religion3 COR 400A3
PSY Senior Seminar3 PSY Elective3
Natural Science3 MTH/CSC Elective (2)3
Free Elective3 Free Elective3
Free Elective3 Free Elective3

(1) Must complete both semesters and must apply in the previous spring to register. Could also complete these in the FOURTH YEAR.

(2) Could be an additional three credits of any natural science course or MIS.

Must complete Core DIV and VPA requirements.

Psychology Minor

A minor in psychology requires 15 credit hours of psychology courses. These courses begin with Introductory Psychology (PSY 101). Selection of the additional particular courses is based upon each student's needs and interests and is made with the approval of the department chair. Students who seek a minor psychology should contact the department chair as early in their career at Le Moyne as possible.

Psychology Minor

Minor RequirementsHours
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology 3
Psychology Electives 12

B.S. in Psychology with Teacher Certification (Concentration in Child Education)

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

B.S. in Psychology with Teacher Certification (Concentration in Child Education)

Major RequirementsHours
BSC 340 Brain and Behavior 3
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology 3
PSY 201 Intro to Research Methods 4
PSY 215 Child and Adolescent Development 3
PSY 250 Cognition or PSY 270 Learning (1)3
PSY 301 Psychological Testing 3
PSY 315 Childhood Disorders 3
PSY 401-449, PSY 499 3
Psychology Electives 6
Major SupportHours
MTH 110 Introduction to Statistics I (no Computer Lab) or MTH 1113
MTH 112 Introduction to Statistics II 3
Education RequirementsHours
EDU 105 Teaching in a Diverse Society 3
EDU 120 Child Abuse Workshop/SAVE Violence Prev 0
EDU 122 Dignity for All Student Act (dasa) Training for Teacher Certification 0
EDU 150 Contemporary Perspectives on Special Ed 3
EDU 205 Childhood Learning and Special Needs 3
EDU 225 Assess & Dec Making for Equity/Inclusion 3
EDU 305 Prin & Methods of Multicultural Literacy 3
EDU 315 Plan,Assessing,Managing Inclusive Clsrm (3)3
EDU 365 Adapting Literacy Lrn Stu W/Spec Needs (3)3
EDU 375 Strategies & Technol for Inclusive Clsrm 3
EDU 405 Preservice Clinical Teaching Seminar (2)3
EDU 430 Supervised Preservice Teach/Grades 1-6 (2)6
EDU 431 Supervised Preserv Teaching (SPE 1-6) Supervised Preservice Teach (SPE 1-6) (2)6

(1) Although students may take either PSY 250 or PSY 270, both are strongly encouraged.

(2) Coursework done during student teaching semester in the fall of senior year.

(3) Must have junior status to take

Typical Program for B.S. in Psychology with Teacher Certification (Concentration in Child Education)

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
COR 1003 EDU 1053
EAC (1)3 EAC (1)3
PSY 1013 PSY 2014
MTH 1103 MTH 1123
Sophomore Year
HST 1103 HST 1113
ENG 210 (2)3 EDU 1503
Theology3 PHL 2103
PSY 2153 PSY 250/2703
EDU 2053 EDU 2253
Junior Year
ENG 3103 EDU 3753
IDS3 EDU 3653
EDU 3153 EDU 3763
EDU 3053 PSY 3153
PSY 3013 BSC 3403
Senior Year
EDU 4053 Religion3
EDU 4306 COR 400A3
EDU 4316 PSY Senior Seminar3
EDU 120/121/1220 PSY Elective3
PSY Elective3

Must complete Core DIV and VPA requirement

(1) EAC must be foreign language course.

(2) ENG 210 - Major Authors must be Shakespeare

Dual Major in Psychology and Theatre

The psychology department has partnered with the theatre arts program to offer students the option of a dual major in psychology and theatre. Students interested in pursuing a double major should contact the director of theater arts or chair of psychology for more information.

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

Dual Major in Psychology and Theatre

Notes on CORE: ENG 210 must be Shakespeare, EAC must be 6 credits of the same foreign language, Mathematics fulfilled by MTH 110, Social Science (other than PSY), Natural Science (fulfilled by BSC 340), Visual and Performing Arts (fulfilled by major)

Major RequirementsHours
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology 3
PSY 201 Intro to Research Methods 4
PSY 340 Brain and Behavior 3
PSY 400 History & Systems Psychology 3
Psychology Electives (PSY 215 and PSY 280 recommended) 18
THR 105 Introduction to Theatre 3
THR 110 Stagecraft 3
THR 205 Acting I 3
THR 210 Fundamentals of Design for Theatre 3
THR 302 The Western Drama Tradition 3
THR 440 Theatre Context 4
THR/ENG Dramatic Literature 3
THR Elective (These must include one design class and one performance class) 9
One of the following two playmaking courses: 3
THR 335 Devised Theatre3
THR 340 Directing3
THR 260 Theatre Practicum (Production experience credit, value to be assigned by department: 1/2 to 2 credits. Within 4 years, this must total 3 credits.)1
Major SupportHours
Foreign Language (fulfills core EAC requirement) 3
MTH 110 Introduction to Statistics I (no Computer Lab) or MTH 111 Statistics. (Fulfills core math requirement)3
MTH 112 Introduction to Statistics II 3
Free Elective 3

Courses


PSY 101 . Introductory Psychology (3).

A one semester broad overview of contemporary psychology-its diverse approaches to the understanding of behavior and the basic principles and research findings associated with each of these approaches. Specific areas of psychological inquiry discussed include physiological, cognitive and social psychology; learning, sensation and perception; emotion and motivation; personality and psychopathology. This course is a prerequisite for most psychology courses.

PSY 201 . Intro to Research Methods (4).

This course is designed to provide a working knowledge of the major research and data collection methods used in psychology. Topics will include the scientific method approach to research, ethics, and experimental design. Students will acquire proficiency in APA style writing, information and technological literacy, understanding basic statistical analyses, and the critical evaluation of evidence that includes academic and popular presentations of psychological science. Prerequisites: MTH 110 or MTH 111, PSY 101. It is highly recommended that students take MTH 112 prior to or concurrently with this course.

PSY 215 . Child and Adolescent Development (3).

An examination of the emergence of basic competencies (e.g., language, cognitive abilities, interpersonal skills) from birth to adolescence, and the integration of these competencies in the person of the growing child at successive life-stages. Various theoretical and experimental approaches to the study of human development are investigated. The practical implications of developmental processes will be explored in selected areas. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of the instructor. Only one of PSY 215 or PSY 220 may be taken for major credit.

PSY 220 . Human Life Span Development (3).

This course is a general introduction to human development. The study of human development is a scientific analysis of patterns of change and growth across the entire lifespan from conception through very old age. The course will include the investigation of essential questions of human experience including, inherited factors, attach- ment to caregivers, mastery of the human body and the environment, meaningful social relationships, achievement, occupational choice, impact of societal expectations, the formulation of values and goals, the concept of generativity, and death and dying. The course will analyze human develop- ment from a biopsychosocial perspective looking closely at basic patterns of normal development. Prerequisite, PSY 101. Students may receive major psychology elective credit for PSY 220 only if not also receiving major psychology elective credit from PSY 215 or PSY 320.

PSY 230 . Motivation and Emotion (3).

A survey of the major theories concerned with the motivation of behavior. Individual and environmental determinants are examined. Emphasis is on the role of emotional and cognitive factors as motivational variables. Related research is presented and critically analyzed. Theories and research are applied to practical situations. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of the instructor.

PSY 250 . Cognition (3).

A study of contemporary issues in human behavior. Specific topics include attention, memory, concept attainment, problem solving, the interaction of language with these processes and the disorders experienced by those with deficiencies in these areas. Research on these topics and various theoretical models designed to explain human information processing are examined. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of the instructor.

PSY 260 . Social Psychology (3).

Introduction to the theoretical and empirical investigations of how interaction with others influences the thoughts, emotions and behavior of the individual. Topics include person perception (e.g., impression formation, liking and loving), attitude formation and change (e.g., persuasion, conformity), aggression, helping behavior and group process (e.g., leadership, group decision making). Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of the instructor.

PSY 270 . Learning (3).

A general survey covering principles of animal and human learning, theories of learning and application of learning principles. Topics include the basic learning processes of classical and instructional conditioning, discrimination and generalization, and escape and avoidance learning, as well as more complex processes of verbal learning, retention and transfer. Applications of basic learning principals such as behavior modification, with emphasis on helping those with learning disabilities, are presented. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of the instructor.

PSY 275 (GWS 275). The Psychology of Women (3).

This course explores empirical research and theory in areas of psychology relevant to women and sex roles. Topics include sex roles and sex-role stereotyping; biological and psychosocial origins of gender; and gender differences in behavior personality and abilities. Readings and class discussions encourage application of concepts to a variety of settings, including female-male relationships, parenting, education, occupation, the media, et al. Students are expected to develop an in-depth topic of special interest for a term paper and/or class presentation. Fulfills Core diversity requirement. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of the instructor.

PSY 280 . Abnormal/Normal Psychology (3).

An introduction to the issues and problems associated with defining, understanding and relating to maladaptive behavior. Historical and philosophical perspectives on the subject covered briefly. The major schools of thought and systems of classifying abnormal behavior are presented and discussed. Questions related to diagnosis, treatment, and research are raised, and societal issues concerning maladaptive behavior are examined. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of the instructor.

PSY 300 . History and Systems Psychology (3).

This course offers an historical survey of the evolution and systematic approaches to the discipline and practice of psychology that have arisen throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. Theoretical and systematic viewpoints such as psychodynamic, Gestalt, behavioral, and cognitive psychology are examined in terms of their scientific antecedents, philosophical foundations, and sociocultural determinants. Advances in understanding the contributions of women and other previously underrepresented voices to psychology will be explored. This course seeks to understand from the disciplinary research traditions of both history and psychology the intellectual and social contexts within which the discipline of psychology has been constructed over the past century and a half. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of the instructor.

PSY 301 . Psychological Testing (3).

This course surveys the major psychological tests used in schools, clinics, industry, government and psychological research. This course covers how such tests are constructed, administered, interpreted and validated, and outlines current issues and controversies of the field. Topics include the history and ethics of testing; tests of achievement, interests and special abilities; personality assessment; the use of these tests in identifying exceptionality-, and the controversy surrounding intelligence tests. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and MTH 111 (or an equivalent semester of Statistics I) or permission of the instructor.

PSY 302 . Personality (3).

Introduction to the theoretical and empirical investigations of the development, maintenance and modification of the unique thoughts, emotions and behaviors characteristic of the individual. Topics include theoretical perspectives based primarily upon the concepts of conflict (e.g., Freud, Jung), fulfillment (e.g., Rogers, Maslow), consistency (e.g., Kelley), trait (e.g., Allport, Carrell) and learning (e.g., Skinner, Bandura) and empirical investigations of self-esteem, anxiety and defense mechanisms. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of the instructor.

PSY 303 (BIO 270). Animal Behavior (4).

The mechanisms of animal and human behavior are investigated in a broad descriptive sample. Special emphasis is placed on the physiology, development and evolution of behavior patterns. Prerequisite: Eight credit hours of biology. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Carries biology major credit.

PSY 309 (CCM 409/CCM 509). Culture and Mental Disorder (3).

This seminar examines mental disorders from bio-medical and social constructionist perspectives; both cross-cultural variation and universals are explored in traditional cultures and modern nations, e.g., Africa, Mexico, Native Americans, Hutterits, Near East. First-person accounts are used to analyze the inner world of mental illness, and bio-cultural models of psychosis is proposed.

PSY 315 . Childhood Disorders (3).

This general introduction to the field of childhood psycho-pathology will consider basic issues in the etiology, diagnosis and treatment of common behavioral disorders and developmental deviations. Topics included are: childhood schizophrenia and autism, phobias and psychosomatic disorders, mental retardation and specific learning disabilities, hyperactivity and antisocial behavior. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and 215 or 280 or permission of the instructor.

PSY 320 . Aging and Adult Development (3).

This course will examine the psychological development of young adults through late adulthood. The primary focus of this course will be on the development of intelligence, memory and dementia, personality, interpersonal relationships and sexuality in older adults. This course will challenge popular stereotypes of older adults and discuss how culture influences adult development. Students will be required to write a term paper on a topic related to psychology and adult development. Prerequisite/ Corequisite: PSY 201 or permission of the instructor. Only one of PSY 320 or PSY 220 may be taken for major credit.

PSY 325 . Sensation and Perception (3).

The study of the physical structures and psycho- logical processes involved in sensory systems. Topics include how people see, hear, smell, taste and touch, as well as methods for studying both the senses and the way that people make use of sensory information. Various theoretical and philosophical questions about sensation and perception are also addressed. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of instructor.

PSY 330 (PGS 330). Cross-Cultural Psychology (3).

Cross-cultural psychology is an approach emphasizing evaluation of psychological knowledge in the context of culture. Do the discoveries psychologists have made apply to all people from all cultures or only to some people, depending on culture? This course explores the impact of society and culture on human behavior, identity and personality development, social interaction norms, and even perceptual tendencies. We will examine what it means to say that humans are socio-cultural in nature. We will also examine those areas where humans differ, due to varied cultural experiences. Areas of interest will include education and development, views on intelligence, perceptual and cognitive processes, motivation, sex and gender and aggression. The examination of these issues will aid students in developing the ability to understand and interact with individuals and groups in other countries and in our own heterogeneous nation. Fulfills Core requirement(s): Diversity (DIV) and interdisciplinary (IDS).

PSY 335 (CJS 335/LGS 335). Psychology and the Law (3).

The legal system is a pervasive and important part of our lives. The goal of this course is to help students develop an understanding of the psychological aspects of the functioning of the system and the effects of the legal system on us. This course will address the social psychological aspects that impact and are impacted by the legal system. Students will develop an understanding of many issues, including how psychologists contribute to the law and the legal system, psychological theories of crime, psychological issues related to the selection and performance of police officers, the dynamics of eyewitness testimony, jury selection and performance and confessions. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): IDS.

PSY 340 (BSC 340). Brain and Behavior (3).

A study of the relationship of the brain and body to behavior. Emphasis is on the central nervous system. Topics include neuroanatomy, neural cell processes, hemispheric functions, hormonal regulation of behavior, physiological mechanisms involved in attention, arousal and sleep, and the neural bases of emotions learning and memory and psychological disorders. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or permission of the instructor.

PSY 350 . Health Psychology (3).

Health psychology is a survey course exploring the relationship between behavior and health. All topics will be covered from a bio-psychosocial perspective, illustrating the interaction among variables within an individual's environment. Topics discussed within the course include: psycho-neuroimmunology, anger/hostility and health, smoking cessation, weight control, health care systems, heart disease, cancer, AIDS, psychosomatic illness, gender and socio-cultural differences, stress, pain management and alternative treatments. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 355 . Psychology and Media in the Digital Age (3).

Contemporary life increasingly challenges us to cope with many different and quickly emerging forms of communication and information media. Since the advent of the "Digital Revolution" of the late 20th century, the penetration of these new forms of media into daily life has spawned profound questions about the relationship of human beings and the technologies represented by communications, information, and entertainment media. We will explore various psychological theories (such as phenomenological/sensory-perceptual, narrative/cultural, & social network/systems approaches) that address how and why we engage with digital media and its products. This course will put these psychological insights into dialogue with traditions of media analysis, particularly the media ecology approach of figures such as McLuhan, Ong, and others. In doing so, we will consider a wide range of issues such as media-based violence, the media's impact on personal relationships and identity, problematic Internet use, online sexuality, and others. We will raise questions regarding the ethical and psycho-developmental implications of media consumption. Students will be invited to examine their own uses of media and how these may be affecting their current lives. Prerequisites: PSY 101 (or equivalent) or permission of the instructor.

PSY 360 . Human Sexuality (3).

An examination of the behavioral, emotional and cognitive components of human sexuality. An emphasis will be placed on psychological, social, health and legal aspects of behavior that define our human sexuality. This course intends to help students clarify their attitude toward their own and others' sexuality. Areas to be investigated include sexual values, intimacy, sexual anatomy, gender identity, STDs and sexual variance. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of the instructor.

PSY 365 . Growing Through Play (3).

From building blocks and jungle gyms to organized sports and video games, this course will explore the nature of play and its contributions to our physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development from infancy through adulthood. In doing so, we will consider the many different ways in which we engage in both structured and unstructured play activities, as well as how the objects and people in our environment contribute to those activities. Throughout this course, we will explore a variety of developmental theories and research and you will be asked to apply those theories and the findings from that research to your own observations of play activities and modern day play environments and tools. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and either PSY 215 or PSY 220.

PSY 370 . Organizational Psychology (3).

A study of the behaviors of people employed in work organizations and of the techniques and systems used to stimulate, coordinate and control individual behavior in the work place. Individual motivations to work, interpersonal relations, group dynamics, leadership, influence and behavior modification techniques and the changing nature of work and work organizations are covered. Not open to students who have taken MGT 450. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or MGT 301 or permission of the instructor.

PSY 380 . Counseling and Psychotherapy (3).

An introduction to techniques and theories of counseling and psychotherapy. Components, which are believed to underlie effective counseling and therapy regardless of theoretical orientation and which are applicable to a variety of interpersonal situations, are studied in some detail. The major theoretical approaches to counseling are covered, and students are introduced to research on the process and effectiveness of psychotherapy. One area in which such skills are applied-the treatment of persons with emotional problems-will be examined. This course does not attempt to train professional counselors, but to provide a framework and a basis for understanding and evaluating the counseling process from which students can, after further training and experience, become effective counselors. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or permission of instructor.

PSY 390 . Independent Study (1-4).

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration, a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure and number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair and the academic dean. It will be kept on file in the academic dean's office. Three hours work per week for each credit. Hours and credit to be determined by the instructor and student. Experiential course.

PSY 401 . Advanced Research in Psychology (3).

Students carry out an independent research project on the topic of their choice with the advice and supervision of a faculty member. The course is designed to give the student an opportunity to use the skills acquired in Introduction to Research Methods (PSY-201) and to examine an area of interest through designing and conducting an original research study. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 201 and permission of the instructor. Hours to be determined by the instructor and student. Experiential course.

PSY 402 . Positive Psychology (3).

Traditionally, the modern Western model of clinical psychology has focused on researching, diagnosing, and treating psychological disorders. Theoretically, clinical psychology is based on a deficit or disease model, describing how individuals are lacking psychological resources or evidencing abnormal thinking or behavior. Positive psychology provides a paradigm shift from this disease model, moving beyond just helping people survive their negative life experiences to offering them an enlarged vision of how they can thrive and actualize their potential. This course focuses on the research, techniques, and practical applications of positive psychology including the topics of well-being, character strengths, optimism, resiliency, values, happiness, wellness, accomplishments, and positive relationships.

PSY 404 . Psychology of Decision Making (3).

Following a seminar format, this course explores theoretical approaches to the process of decision making and relates theory and data to applied situations. The course addresses issues relevant to decisions made on both an individual and a group level. Discussions cover a range of settings including business, medicine and matters of personal relevance. A variety of factors is considered, including cognitive, perceptual and subjective value judgments. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 442 . Infancy (3).

A comprehensive overview of growth and development during the first three years of life. Topics covered will include how infants gather information from the world around them, what we know about infants' relationships with other people, and about the uniqueness of their personalities. A concerted effort will be made to achieve a balance between theory, research and practical information. Prerequisite: PSY 215 or 220 and PSY 201 or permission of the instructor.

PSY 444 . Story in Psy:Narrative Perspectives (3).

Employing a pro-seminar format, we explore how stories and story construction serve as an increasingly influential and integrating paradigm by which to understand human behavior. We will look at the historical and conceptual foundations of the narrative perspective and compare this approach with more traditional models of human psychological functioning. We will pay particular attention to autobiographical memory, self- narrative, and identity development of the contemporary world as well as narrative approaches to psychotherapy & health care as examples of the perspective's scope. We will consider recent advances in narrative research methodologies, particularly those qualitative approaches which focus upon interview and other autobiographical sources of data. Students will be expected to prepare an idividual presentation on a topic of their choosing and personal interest. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or permission of the instructor. Limited to Juniors and Seniors.

PSY 445 (NSG 545). The Psychology of Grief (3).

Psychology 445 will examine grief processes that take place within individuals and families as they experience loss. The course will focus on the nature and causes of grief as well as strategies for effective counseling interventions. There will be an emphasis on loss due to death, however, other types of psychosocial and physical losses will also be considered. Accordingly, we will explore a variety of factors that facilitate and/or impede the ability to function after loss. The course will initially trace the development of dominant models of grief and their historical and theoretical underpinnings. Considerable emphasis will be on examining the grief process as it is played out in the context of family. The family is seen as an interactive system, with a complex mix of actions, perceptions and expectations that influences relationships and the experience of grief among family members. This course will also consider a postmodern view of bereavement as a complex phenomenon embedded in a unique context involving social, cultural, philosophical and psychological factors.

PSY 447 (GWS 447). Psych of Stereotypes/Prejudice/Discrim (3).

This course is designed to enhance the understanding of the development and persistence of stereotypes. The psychology of social cognition with regard to the accuracy and inaccuracy of those stereotypes will be addressed as well as how the inaccuracies may lead to prejudice and discrimination. We will explore how this affects our social interactions; specifically addressing the areas of race, class and gender. Students will read book chapters and journal articles and are expected to contribute to classroom discussions of these materials. Students will also complete a writing project. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or permission of the instructor. Limited to juniors and seniors.

PSY 448 . Clinical Neuropsychology (3).

Clinical neuropsychology studies human behavior following damage to or dysfunction of the nervous system. Such study seeks to establish both (a) the accurate assessment and remediation of damage or dysfunction and (b) a more complete understanding of the intact nervous system. Utilizing a proseminar format, this course is designed to introduce the advanced undergraduate student of psychology to the research findings and clinical applications of this developing subfield within psychology. Both case studies and laboratory-based research will be reviewed. Topics will include general principles of the brain-behavior relationship, basic and higher cognitive functions of the cerebral cortex, neuropsychological testing and assessment and processes of rehabilitation. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and PSY 340 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

PSY 449 . The Psychology of Disabilities (3).

This course explores in-depth some of the major psychological issues relevant to the field of disabilities. Following a seminar format, topics to be discussed include: autism, cerebral palsy, mental retardation, deafness, blindness, dual diagnosis, housing alternatives, self advocacy, sibling relationships, the social meaning of disabled, deinstitutionalization and human relationships. The perspective of the person with a disability and/or their family and support systems will be considered. Prerequisites: PSY 101; PSY 315 recommended.

PSY 471 . Projects in Psychology (1-3).

Under faculty supervision, students who are especially interested and qualified may assist faculty members in research or complete a placement in an applied setting. Requirements to be determined by the student and faculty member. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Hours and credit to be determined by the instructor and student. Experiential course.

PSY 490 . Field Experience in Psychology (3).

This course offers students an opportunity to synthesize and integrate their academic knowledge within a field setting in psychology. Students are placed in a mental health or other human service agency in which psychologists work or psychological concepts and principles significantly inform the goals and practices of the organization. Each student receives close supervision within the agency setting. Students also meet weekly in a group with the course instructor to discuss issues and problems related to their experience. Offered on a high pass/pass/fail basis only. Eight hours field experience and one hour classwork per week for two semesters. Only open to junior and senior psychology majors with permission of the instructor or department chair. Must be taken for two semesters. Experiential course.

PSY 491 . Field Experience in Psychology (3).

This course offers students an opportunity to synthesize and integrate their academic knowledge within a field setting in psychology. Students are placed in a mental health or other human service agency in which psychologists work or psychological concepts and principles significantly inform the goals and practices of the organization. Each student receives close supervision within the agency setting. Students also meet weekly in a group with the course instructor to discuss issues and problems related to their experience. Offered on a high pass/pass/fail basis only. Eight hours field experience and one hour classwork per week for two semesters. Only open to junior and senior psychology majors with permission of the instructor or department chair. Must be taken for two semesters. Experiential course.

PSY 499 . Departmental Honors in Psychology (1-8).

An upper-class student who wishes to complete a research thesis for Departmental Honors must submit a proposal prior to registration and a research report at the end of the semester. The proposal must be approved by the research director, the department chair and the academic dean. It will be kept on file, along with the research report, in the chair's office and the library. Prerequisite: PSY 401. Experiential course.

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