Chemistry

Chair: Carmen J. Giunta
Associate Professor(s): Theresa L. Beaty, Michael P. Masingale, Joseph J. Mullins, Anna O'Brien
Adjunct(s): Olivia Barrett, Elizabeth Danaher, Thomas Donegan, Donald Hughes, Pushkar Kaul, Barbara Leo, Gerard McPhee, Charles Montgomery, James Morgan, Terence Morrill, Rachel Henriques Porter, Steven Rubenstein, Farhana Syed, Nisha Varghese


The chemistry program has been accredited by the American Chemical Society and closely follows the recommendations of that society in the design of its academic programs.

The minimum requirements for the B.S. degree in chemistry include two semesters of each of the following areas: general, organic, analytical and physical chemistry; inorganic chemistry and biochemistry; and one upper-division chemistry elective. A student completing the program is certified by the American Chemical Society. Exceptions to American Chemical Society certification may be made by the department chair.

Chemistry Major

This is the major sequence usually leading to advanced studies in the field.

Each chemistry major will have the opportunity to participate in an original research project under the supervision of a faculty member. The department encourages all majors to become involved in the research program. An honors program in chemistry is also available. Please contact the department chair.

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

Chemistry Major -B.S.

Major RequirementsHours
CHM 151 Chemical Principles I 3
CHM 151L Chemical Principles I Laboratory 1
CHM 152 Chemical Principles II 3
CHM 152L Chemical Principles II Lab 1
CHM 223 Organic Chemistry I 3
CHM 223L Organic Chemistry 1 Lab 1
CHM 224 Organic Chemistry II 3
CHM 224L Organic Chemistry II Lab 1
CHM 280 Information in Chemistry and Physical Sciences 1
CHM 311 Analytical Chemistry 4
CHM 312 Instrumental Methods of Analysis or CHM 320 & 322 Instrumental Methods of Analysis4
CHM 327 Physical Chemistry I 3
CHM 328 Physical Chemistry II 3
CHM 331 Physical Chemistry Laboratory 1
CHM 332 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory 1
CHM 435 Inorganic Chemistry 3
CHM 460 Biochemistry I 3
Chemistry Elective (upper division) 3
Major SupportHours
BIO 191 General Biology I 4
PHY 105-106 General Physics (recommended) or PHY 101-102 6
PHY 103 General Physics Laboratory 1
PHY 104 General Physics Laboratory 1
MTH 145 Calculus I 4
MTH 146 Calculus II 4
ElectivesHours
Free Electives 24

Typical Program for Chemistry Major -B.S.

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
WRT 1013 HST 1113
CHM 1513 CHM 1523
CHM 151L1 CHM 152L1
MTH 1454 MTH 1464
HST 1103 Social Science3
COR 1003 PHL 1103
Sophomore Year
CHM 2233 CHM 2243
CHM 223L1 CHM 224L1
PHY 1053 PHY 1063
PHY 1031 PHY 1041
ENG 2103 EAC3
Theology3 Elective3
EAC3 PHL 2103
Junior Year
BIO 1914 CHM 3283
CHM 3273 CHM 3321
ENG 3103 CHM 2801
CHM 3311 Elective3
CHM 4353 IDS3
Elective3 Elective3
Senior Year
Religion3 CHM 3124
CHM 3114 Elective3
Elective3 Elective3
Elective3 CHM Elective3
CHM 4603 COR 400A3
VPA1

Chemistry Major with a Minor in Biology

A second way of achieving a B.S. degree in chemistry includes a simultaneous minor in biology. In addition to providing the student with the background required for a meaningful career in chemistry, this program is also designed to prepare the student for further studies in biochemistry, medicine, dentistry (including all requirements for admission to such programs), as well as graduate studies in these and related fields. This curriculum would permit an easy transition to a major in biochemistry or biology should the student find these subjects of greater interest. A number of free electives are permitted, making this a very flexible program. A suggested form for the program follows.

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

Chemistry Major B.S. with a Minor in Biology

Major RequirementsHours
CHM 151 Chemical Principles I 3
CHM 151L Chemical Principles I Laboratory 1
CHM 152 Chemical Principles II 3
CHM 152L Chemical Principles II Lab 1
CHM 223 Organic Chemistry I 3
CHM 223L Organic Chemistry 1 Lab 1
CHM 224 Organic Chemistry II 3
CHM 224L Organic Chemistry II Lab 1
CHM 280 Information in Chemistry and Physical Sciences 1
CHM 311 Analytical Chemistry 4
CHM 312 Instrumental Methods of Analysis or CHM 320 & 322 Instrumental Methods of Analysis4
CHM 327 Physical Chemistry I 3
CHM 328 Physical Chemistry II 3
CHM 331 Physical Chemistry Laboratory 1
CHM 332 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory 1
CHM 435 Inorganic Chemistry 3
CHM 460 Biochemistry I 3
Chemistry Elective (upper division) 3
Major SupportHours
BIO 191 General Biology I 4
PHY 105-106 General Physics (recommended) or PHY 101-102 6
PHY 103 General Physics Laboratory 1
PHY 104 General Physics Laboratory 1
MTH 145 Calculus I 4
MTH 146 Calculus II 4
Minor RequirementsHours
BIO 192 General Biology II 4
BIO 218 Cell and Molecular Biology 4
Biology Elective 3
ElectivesHours
Free Electives 13

Typical Program for Chemistry Major B.S. with a Minor in Biology

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
CHM 1513 CHM 1523
CHM 151L1 CHM 152L1
BIO 1914 BIO 1924
MTH 1454 MTH 1464
WRT 1013 Social Science3
COR 1003 PHL 1103
Sophomore Year
CHM 2233 CHM 2243
CHM 223L1 CHM 224L1
PHY 1053 PHY 1063
HST 1103 HST 1113
ENG 2103 PHL 2103
PHY 1031 PHY 1041
Theology3 Elective3
Junior Year
CHM 3273 CHM 3283
CHM 3311 CHM 3321
EAC3 EAC3
CHM 4353 IDS3
BIO 2184 CHM 2801
Biology Elective3
Elective1
Senior Year
CHM 3114 CHM 312/CHM 320 & 3224
CHM 4603 CHM Elective3
ENG 3103 Elective3
Elective3 Elective3
Religion3 COR 400A3
VPA1

Note: An interdisciplinary major in biochemistry is available.

Chemistry with a Concentration in Pre-Engineering

The chemistry B.S. can be taken with a pre-engineering concentration to serve as the foundation for the Bachelor’s in Chemistry and Master’s in Chemical Engineering degree program at Syracuse University.

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

B.S. in Chemistry and M.S. in Chemical Pre-Engineering

Major RequirementsHours
CHM 151 Chemical Principles I *3
CHM 151L Chemical Principles I Laboratory *1
CHM 152 Chemical Principles II *3
CHM 152L Chemical Principles II Lab *1
CHM 223 Organic Chemistry I *3
CHM 223L Organic Chemistry 1 Lab *1
CHM 224 Organic Chemistry II *3
CHM 224L Organic Chemistry II Lab *1
CHM 280 Information in Chemistry and Physical Sciences 1
CHM 311 Analytical Chemistry 4
CHM 312 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 4
CHM 327 Physical Chemistry I *3
CHM 328 Physical Chemistry II *3
CHM 331 Physical Chemistry Laboratory *1
CHM 332 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory *1
CHM 435 Inorganic Chemistry 3
CHM 460 Biochemistry I 3
CHM elective**
Major SupportHours
MTH 145 Calculus I *4
MTH 146 Calculus II *4
MTH 245 Calculus III *4
MTH 304 Differential Equations for Scientists And Engineers *4
MTH 311 Introduction to Probability Theory *3
BIO 191 General Biology I 4
PHY 103 General Physics Laboratory *1
PHY 104 General Physics Laboratory *1
PHY 105 General Physics Scientists/Engineers I *3
PHY 106 General Physics Scientists/Engineers II *3
PHY 333 Computational Physics *3
ECS 326 Engineering Materials, Properties and Processing*+ 3
CEN 231 Mass and Energy Balances*+ 3
CEN 333 Fluid Transport*+ 3
CEN 341 Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer*+ 4
CEN 587 Chemical Reaction Engineering*+ 3

*Satisfies prerequisites for admission to MS program.

**Satisfied by ECS 326 or CEN 587.

+Taken at Syracuse University.

Typical Program for B.S. in Chemistry and M.S. in Chemical Pre-Engineering

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
CHM 1513 CHM 1523
CHM 151L1 CHM 152L1
MTH 1454 MTH 1464
PHY 1053 PHY 1063
PHY 1031 PHY 1041
COR 1003 PHL 1103
WRT 1013 VPA1
Sophomore Year
CHM 2233 PHY 3333
CHM 223L1 CHM 2243
CEN 231**3 CHM 224L1
MTH 2454 MTH 3044
BIO 1914 PHL 2103
HST 1103 HST 1113
CHM 2801
Junior Year
CEN 333**3 CEN 341**3
CHM 327/3314 CHM 328/3324
CHM 4353 Theology3
ECS 326**3 Social Science3
ENG 2103 IDS3
Senior Year
CHM 3114 CHM 3124
CEN 587**3 ENG 3103
MTH 3113 Religion3
CHM 4603 COR 400A3
EAC3 EAC3
Fifth Year
Syracuse University MS Chemical Engineering Syracuse University MS Chemical Engineering

**Taken at Syracuse University

Biochemistry Major B.S.

An interdisciplinary major in biochemistry is available. For details, see Interdisciplinary Programs.

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

Forensic Sciences

An articulation with Syracuse University allows qualified students to apply for a five-year program leading to a B.S. in chemistry and an M.S. in forensic science or biomedical forensic sciences. For more information see the Undergraduate Transfer Programs section of this catalog.

Chemistry Minor

The requirements for the chemistry minor are at least 15 credit hours of chemistry. These must include at least three lecture courses with their associated laboratories. At least three credit hours must be at the 300- or 400- level. None of the courses may be taken as pass/fail.

Courses


CHM 101 . Preparing for Chemistry (3).

A course designed to provide students with the academic foundation to successfully complete the introductory chemistry course, i.e. Chemical Principles I and II. This preparation will be primarily directed toward acquiring those higher order thinking skills considered most important in order if students are to successfully learn the course content of the introductory course. Students will also be aided in developing the level of problem solving ability that is required to successfully complete a college level introductory chemistry course.

CHM 122 . Chemistry and the Consumer (3).

The design of this course is helping students understand how chemistry affects their daily lives, preparing them to make educated decisions on issues of science and chemical technology and to foster the development of critical thinking skills. Students will be provided with knowledge of the application of basic concepts and principles necessary to think critically about chemistry in their personal environment. An overview of the chemistry of everyday products and processes will be made through lecture discussions that will involve the chemistry of foods, fabrics, personal care products, plastics and other common household products.

CHM 151 . Chemical Principles I (3).

An integrated approach to many of the major concepts of chemistry with approximately equal emphasis on general descriptive chemistry and introduction to theoretical chemistry. Topics include atomic and molecular theory, periodic properties, chemical equations and stoichiometry. CHM 151 and CHM 151L are to be taken concurrently, except by permission of the department chair. Prerequisite: High school chemistry or permission of the department chair.

CHM 151L . Chemical Principles I Laboratory (1).

This laboratory includes experiments in chemical systhesis, analysis, and composition and physical properties. A variety of techniques are utilized. This laboratory course addresses many of the same topics CHM 151 treats in the classroom. CHM 151 and CHM 151L are to be taken concurrently, except by permission of the department chair.

CHM 152 . Chemical Principles II (3).

An integrated approach to many of the major concepts of chemistry with approximately equal emphasis on general descriptive chemistry and introduction to theoretical chemistry. Topics include chemical kinetics and thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, gas laws, solutions, acids and bases. CHM 152 and CHM 152L are to be taken concurrently, except by permission of the department chair. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in CHM 151 or by permission of the department chair.

CHM 152L . Chemical Principles II Lab (1).

This laboratory includes experiments in chemical synthesis, analysis, separation, kinetics, and equilibrium. A variety of techniques and modern equipment are utilized. This laboratory course addresses many of the same topics CHM 152 treats in the classroom. CHM 152 and CHM 152L are to be taken concurrently, except by permission of the department chair.

CHM 223 . Organic Chemistry I (3).

The nomenclature, structure, reactions, preparations and physical properties of organic compounds are studied. Extensive use of reaction mechanisms, resonance theory and conformational analysis is used to correlate a wide variety of reactions. Topics include chemical bonding, saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, stereochemistry, spectroscopy and other functional groups. Special emphasis is on natural products and substances of biological importance. Prerequisites: CHM 151 and CHM 152 or equivalents. The course counts for three credit hours. CHM 223L is to be taken concurrently, except by permission of the department chair.

CHM 223L . Organic Chemistry 1 Lab (1).

This course will introduce fundamental organic chemistry laboratory techniques utilizing primarily microscale chemical reactions. Various skills will be developed, such as synthetic methods, purification methods (distillation, extraction, recrystallization, chromatography) and analytical techniques. The concepts of organic chemistry will be put into practice via the systhesis and study of materials of common use and theoretical interest. Prerequisites: CHM 151 and CHM 152 or equivalents. The course counts for one credit hour. CHM 223 is to be taken concurrently, except by permission of the department chair.

CHM 224 . Organic Chemistry II (3).

The nomenclature, structure, reactions, preparations and physical properties of organic compounds are studied. Extensive use of reaction mechanisms, resonance theory and conformational analysis is used to correlate a wide variety of reactions. Topics include aromatics, carbonyl compounds, alcohols, amines and other functional groups. Special emphasis is on natural products and substances of biological importance. Prerequisites: CHM 223. The course counts for three credit hours. CHM 224L is to be taken concurrently, except by permission of department chair.

CHM 224L . Organic Chemistry II Lab (1).

The course will build upon the foundation of organic chemistry laboratory techniques and concepts from the first semester, utilizing primarily microscale chemical reactions and techniques. Various skills will be learned and improved upon, such as purification methods (distillation, extraction, recrystallization, chromatography), synthetic methods, and analytical techniques. Functional groups studied will include alkenes, arenes, carbonyl compounds, etc. Prerequisites: CHM 223 and CHM 223L (or equivalents). The course counts for one credit hour. CHM 224 is to be taken concurrently except by permission of the department chair.

CHM 280 (LIB 280/PHY 280). Information in Chemistry and Physical Sciences (1).

This course will introduce the changing information landscape in chemistry and the physical sciences to help students become effective database and "free web" searchers. Students will also become familiar with the social and ethical issues relating to the production and use of scientific information in an increasingly digital society.

CHM 311 . Analytical Chemistry (4).

An integrated lecture and laboratory study of the underlying principles of the quantitative determination of substances using both gravimetric and volumetric techniques. Prerequisites: CHM 223-224. Two lectures and six hours laboratory each week for one semester, four hours credit.

CHM 312 . Instrumental Methods of Analysis (4).

A study of the instrumental methods of analysis most commonly employed in both quality control and research investigations. The laboratory introduces the student to a number of instrumental techniques and their application to analysis to include spectroscopic, potentiometric and electrometric methods. Prerequisite: CHM 311 or permission of the instructor. Two lecture hours and six hours laboratory each week for one semester.

CHM 320 . Instrumental Methods of Analysis (3).

A study of the instrumental methods of quantitative and qualitative chemical analysis will introduce students to spectroscopic, chromatographic, and mass spectrometry techniques among others.Prerequisites: CHM 223-224 or permission of the instructor. Corequisites: CHM 322.

CHM 322 . Instrumental Analysis Lab (1).

The laboratory experience includes acquisition of and analysis of data using instruments such as NMR, IR, UV-vis, HPLC and GCMS. Prerequisites: CHM 223-224 or permission of the instructor. Co-requisites: CHM 320.

CHM 327 . Physical Chemistry I (3).

A survey of the physical properties of matter. The course includes a study of atomic and molecular structure and spectroscopy in the context of quantum mechanics; an examination of the properties of gases, solutions, and equilibria under the unifying principles of thermodynamics; and an exploration of such dynamical processes as chemical kinetics and transport properties. Prerequisites: CHM 224 and MTH 145-146 AND PHY 101-102 or PHY 105-106. Three lectures each week for one year.

CHM 328 . Physical Chemistry II (3).

A survey of the physical properties of matter. The course includes a study of atomic and molecular structure and spectroscopy in the context of quantum mechanics; an examination of the properties of gases, solutions, and equilibria under the unifying principles of thermodynamics; and an exploration of such dynamical processes as chemical kinetics and transport properties. Prerequisites: CHM 224 and MTH 145-146 OR MTH 151-152; PHY 101-102. Three lectures each week for one year.

CHM 331 . Physical Chemistry Laboratory (1).

Laboratory investigations of thermodynamic, transport, chemical kinetic and molecular structural properties provide an introduction to experimental physical chemistry, with an emphasis on use of computers and electronic instrumentation. Prerequisite: CHM 327-328. Three hours laboratory each week for one year.

CHM 332 . Physical Chemistry II Laboratory (1).

Laboratory investigations of thermodynamic, transport, chemical kinetic and molecular structural properties provide an introduction to experimental physical chemistry, with an emphasis on use of computers and electronic instrumentation. Prerequisite: CHM 327-328. Three hours laboratory each week for one year.

CHM 340 (ESS 340). Environmental Chemistry (3).

The focus of this course is on understanding the underlying chemical principles and reactions of natural systems and anthropogenic compounds in the environment. Topics such as chemistry of the atmosphere, aqueous media, pollutants and energy sources will be covered. The emphasis of the course is on chemical aspects of environmental science, so a general background in chemistry is a prerequisite. Prerequisite: CHM 223

CHM 340L (ESS 340L). Environmental Chemistry Laboratory (1).

This is an optional laboratory course that further explores topics covered in the lecture course. The lecture course (CHM 340) may be taken with or without this lab course (CHM 340L). Emphasis is on analytical methods, green chemistry techniques and investigation of materials. Three hours laboratory each week.

CHM 390 . Independent Study (1-3).

A student may pursue independent study in an area of chemistry of mutual interest to the student and a supervising faculty member. Any proposal for independent study must be approved by the department chair and the supervising faculty member prior to registration, and it must specify the number of credits sought, the topic to be studied, the methodology to be followed and the evaluation procedure. Prerequisites and corequisites: CHM 151-152, 223-224.

CHM 435 . Inorganic Chemistry (3).

A study of the principles that underlie the structures and reactivities of inorganic compounds. Included are the application of prominent bonding theories and symmetry to the study of the physical and chemical properties of chemical systems, and a survey of the chemistry of the elements. Prerequisite: CHM 327-328.

CHM 436 . Advanced Organic Chemistry (3).

A study of conformational, resonance and inductive effects on the rate and direction of organic reactions. Special emphasis is on the application of such effects to synthetic organic reactions. Prerequisites: CHM 223-224, CHM 327-328 or permission of instructor.

CHM 460 (BIO 460). Biochemistry I (3).

A lecture course in the chemistry of physiologically relevant compounds. These include proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. The interactions, regulation and metabolism of these compounds will be introduced. Prerequisites: CHM 224 and BIO 191 or permission of instructor. Three hours of lecture per week. Carries biology major credit.

CHM 461 (BIO 461). Biochemistry II (3).

This course is a continuation of CHM 460. Topics to be covered include cellular metabolism and energy production; synthesis and degradation of lipids, amino acids, nucleotides; and regulation of gene expression. Prerequisite: CHM 460. Carries biology major credit.

CHM 462 (BIO 462). Biochemistry Laboratory (1).

This laboratory will introduce techniques for studying proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Prerequisites: CHM 224 and BIO 191, or permission of instructor. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHM 460. Carries biology major credit.

CHM 490 . Internship (1-6).

This is to provide a student with research experience in the chemical industry or any other academic institution. The student intern will report as required to the chemistry faculty member assigned to evaluate his/her research experience. Prerequisite: junior or senior status and prior approval by the department chair. Does not count for CHM/BIOCHEM major or minor credit. Counts as college free elective.

CHM 495 . Research in Chemistry (1-3).

A student who wishes to undertake a research project for academic credit during a given semester must submit a research proposal prior to registration and a research report at the end of the semester. The proposal, indicating the number of credits sought, must be approved by the research director, the department chair and the academic dean. It will be kept on file in the academic dean's office. The research report will be written in the style of a chemistry journal. A copy of this report will be kept on file in the office of the chair of the chemistry department. At the end of the semester each student will present a short (15 min.) oral presentation to interested faculty and peers. Students taking this course for the first time must also take CHM 280 for no credit as part of their research.

CHS 111 . Energy and the Environment (3).

This course, intended for non-science majors, examines a range of environmental topics, which fall under the headings of energy and atmospheric chemistry. The treatment of energy examines several technologies in use and under development for generating energy and the effects of these technologies on the environment. Examination of the atmosphere considers topics such as the ozone layer, acid rain and the greenhouse effect. The primary focus of the course is scientific; however, social, economic and political considerations are also introduced. This course may not be used to fulfill chemistry major or minor requirements.

CHS 113 . Scientific Thought (3).

What is the nature of scientific investigation and the scientific method? How do scientists reason? What counts as good evidence in the practice of science? How does one explanation win acceptance by the scientific community while others languish or are rejected? This course will examine the development of a number of scientific ideas (drawn mainly from chemistry) in an attempt to answer these questions. This course will treat these cases primarily from a scientific perspective, but some attention will also be paid to external factors (for example, social, economic or technological factors). This course may not be used fulfill chemistry major or minor requirements.

CHS 115 . Biotech: Wonder Drugs to Mutant Bugs (3).

Biotech: Wonder Drugs to Mutant Bugs This course will introduce concepts important to the biotechnology revolution. Topics will include drug development, DNA fingerprinting, genetically engineered bacteria and recent technological developments. Social, ethical, legal and economic aspects of various technologies will be discussed. This course may not be used to fulfill chemistry major or minor requirements.

CHS 117 . Drugs: Curse Or Cure (3).

Drugs used by humans can eliminate pain, modulate mood and cure diseases. The scientific basis of biological activity will be studied for several types of drugs. The historical relevance of each representative drug will be discussed, along with the economic and political impact of drug use.

CHS 342 . Bitter/Sweet: Stimulating Human History With Caffeine and Sugar (3).

This course will introduce students to the chemistry, biochemistry, and history of natural stimulants such as caffeine and sugar. Caffeine or related compounds are found in tea, coffee and cacao; sugar (sucrose) is produced in sugar cane and sugar beet. Physiological responses in humans to these stimulants will be studied, including metabolism and addiction. The historical uses of these plant products will be explored, leading to investigations of the social, political, and economic effects of changes in their production, consumption, and trade. Prerequisite: HST 111. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS)and Diversity (DIV).

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