Nursing - Graduate

Associate Professor(s): Barbara M. Carranti
Assistant Professor(s): Virginia Cronin
Professor Emeritus: Susan B. Bastable
Professor(s) of Practice: Kara Keyes
Adjunct(s): Martha Alberti, Helen C. Clancy, Kristin A. Evans, Kattiria "Kathy" Gonzalez, Brooke A. Levandowski, Maria A. MacPherson, Eleanor Price McLees, Gina M. Myers, Scott Peterson, Rhonda L. Reader, Megan Wolfe


The Department of Nursing offers a 39-credit Master of Science (M.S.) and three 12-credit post-master’s certificates in the three specialty practice/functional role tracks: nurse educator, nurse administrator, and informatics. The programs are state approved and nationally accredited by the Commission of Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) and prepare graduates to function in professional leadership positions either as faculty in schools of nursing, as staff development or patient educators, or as managers in the challenging marketplace of health care. The post-master’s certificates are available to nurses who already hold a master’s degree in nursing or in a related field.

The M.S. program curriculum is designed as a two-year program of study for full-time students and a 3-4 year program of study for part-time students. Some courses are offered in a hybrid, on-line or condensed format.

Post-Baccalaureate RN to MS Certificate

The RN to MS Nursing Certificate option is designed for the registered nurse (RN) who has a bachelor’s degree in a field other than nursing. The completion of this certificate program prepares the students for eligibility to continue their education in the Master of Science Program in Nursing at Le Moyne College. The post-baccalaureate certificate does not constitute a BS degree in nursing.

The certificate program consists of five courses offered on a part-time basis in the afternoons and/or in the evenings. A maximum of two equivalent courses may be transferred in if a grade of C or better was earned. Upon completion of these courses the student is prepared to continue graduate study in one of five tracks – nursing education, nursing administration, gerontology, palliative care or informatics.

The following undergraduate courses are required for certificate completion (see undergraduate curriculum for course descriptions):

  • MTH 110 Introduction to Statistics (3)
  • NSG 315 Health Assessment (3)
  • BSC 345 Pathophysiology (3)
  • NSG 350 Research in Nursing (3)
  • NSG 475 Transition to Advanced Nursing Practice (4)*

* This is a comprehensive bridge course which includes bachelor’s-level nursing content foundational to graduate level study.

At least three of the five courses must be taken at Le Moyne College for the certificate to be granted. Students earning this certificate must achieve a minimum grade of C in each course to fulfill prerequisites to Le Moyne's Master of Science Program in Nursing. Up to two graduate courses may be taken concurrently with the last of the five courses required to earn this certification.

Admission Criteria

Candidates applying for the Post-Baccalaureate RN to MS Certificate should submit the following to the Center for Continuing Education:

  • certificate application (PDF may be obtained from the College website at www.lemoyne.edu/continuing_ed)
  • official transcripts for all college-level courses including basic nursing education
  • copy of RN license

Expectations of Program and Graduates

Core competencies provide the foundation upon which the master’s curriculum is built. They are consistent with and integral to the mission of Le Moyne College in preparing graduate nurses for leadership and service in a diverse society. These core competencies, which are fundamental to the practice of advanced professional nursing, are reflected throughout all of the master’s-level course work and include professional role development, caring, critical thinking, communication and research. The following table provides the definitions of these core competencies and illustrates how they are operationalized in the nursing program outcomes.

Graduates of the BS degree program in nursing at Le Moyne who are accepted to the MS program in the Educator, Administrator, or Informatics track can apply the undergraduate NSG 461 and BSC 435 courses to the graduate NSG 561 and NSG 535 courses (these courses do not have to be repeated). However, the student must take an approved selected elective in education and in global health respectively to fulfill credits in their chosen track to meet degree requirements.

Program Objectives

Master of Science

It is the expectation that the M.S. program in nursing will enhance the student’s professional growth and development as outlined in the program objectives. These objectives are derived from, elaborated on and congruent with the program outcomes and reflect expectations of what the students are able to do after graduation.

Upon successful completion of the master’s degree program in nursing at Le Moyne College, the graduate will be prepared to:

  1. practice in the multi-dimensional role as a specialist in the educator, administrator, or informatics track to provide direct or indirect health care to individuals, families, groups, communities and populations.
  2. synthesize knowledge from nursing, related disciplines and the liberal arts and science for application to practice at the advanced level.
  3. communicate effectively with clients, colleagues and other health professionals through advanced listening, verbal, non-verbal and written skills and the proficient use of information technology.
  4. integrate the principles of compassion, ethical decision making, advocacy and cultural diversity when practicing in direct or indirect care provider roles.
  5. integrate research-based findings in advanced professional nursing practice to improve the delivery of health care.
  6. apply advanced critical thinking skills when assessing, designing, implementing and evaluating outcomes of nursing interventions.
  7. demonstrate a high level of decision-making and the ability to formulate policies and regulations for the effective and efficient use of resources in the delivery of services.
  8. assume accountability for professional growth and development and improved practice outcomes through scholarship, continuing education and participation in professional organizations.
  9. apply advanced principles and concepts inherent in the direct or indirect care provider role to offer leadership and service for the enhancement of continuous quality improvement in health care.

Post-Master's Certificates

It is the expectation that the post-master's certificate programs in nursing will enhance the student's professional growth and development as outlined in the program objectives. These objectives are derived from, elaborated on and congruent with the program outcomes and reflect expectations of what the students are able to do after graduation.

Upon successful completion of the post-master's certificate program in nursing at Le Moyne college, the graduate will be prepared to:

  1. communicate effectively with clients, colleagues and other health professionals through advanced listening, verbal, non-verbal and written skills and the proficient use of information technology.
  2. integrate the principles of compassion, ethical decision making, advocacy and cultural diversity when practicing in a specialty track.
  3. integrate research-based findings in advanced professional nursing practice to improve the delivery of health care.
  4. apply advanced critical thinking skills when assessing, designing, implementing and evaluating outcomes of nursing interventions.
  5. demonstrate a high level of decision-making ability for the effective and efficient use of resources in the delivery of services.
  6. apply advanced principles and concepts inherent in the educator, administrator, or informatics track to provide leadership and service for the enhancement of continuous quality improvement in health care.

Technical Standards

Each student must be able to meet the technical standards of performance that are necessary to gain the knowledge and skills for advanced nursing practice.

Master of Science

The nursing program’s curriculum is designed to provide the education necessary for the advanced practice of nursing at the master’s level of preparation. Students build on the fundamental principles of nursing, acquire skills of critical judgment based on education and experience, and develop an ability to use principles and skills wisely in decision-making and problem solving pertaining to the delivery of safe, high quality nursing services.

Students of the M.S. program in nursing are expected to fulfill the following technical standards:

  • Acquire information from demonstrations and experiences in the nursing and elective courses, including but not limited to, information conveyed through lecture, group seminar, small group activities and physical demonstrations.
  • Acquire information from written documents and computer-information systems (including literature searches and data retrieval), and identify information presented in images from paper, videos, transparencies and slides.
  • Use and interpret information from diagnostic maneuvers (e.g., sphygmomanometer, otoscope, ophthalmoscope, etc.), and other diagnostic representations of physiological phenomena during the course of conducting a comprehensive physical assessment of a client.
  • Accurately elicit information, including a medical history and other information required to adequately and effectively evaluate a client’s condition.
  • Synthesize information, problem solve and think critically to judge which theory and/or strategy of assessment and intervention is most appropriate.
  • Use intellectual ability, exercise proper judgment, timely and accurately complete responsibilities attendant to the advanced practice role.
  • Maintain effective, mature and sensitive relationships with clients, students, faculty, staff, preceptors and other professionals under all circumstances.
  • Communicate effectively and efficiently with faculty, colleagues, preceptors and all members of the health care team during practicum and other learning experiences.
  • Possess emotional stability to function effectively under stress and adapt to changing environments inherent in the classroom and practice settings.
  • Upon admission, a candidate who discloses a disability and requests accommodation will be asked to provide documentation of his or her disability for the purpose of determining appropriate accommodations, including modification to the program.
The College will provide reasonable accommodations, but is not required to make modifications that would substantially alter the nature or requirements of the program or provide auxiliary aids that present an undue burden to the College. To matriculate or continue in the curriculum, the candidate must be able to perform all the essential functions outlined in the Technical Standards either with or without accommodation.

Post-Master's Certificates

Students of the post-master’s certificate programs are expected to fulfill the following technical standards:

  • Synthesize information, problem solve and think critically to judge which theory and/or strategy of assessment and intervention is most appropriate.
  • Use intellectual ability, exercise proper judgment, timely and accurately complete responsibilities attendant to the advanced practice role.
  • Maintain effective, mature and sensitive relationships with clients, students, faculty, staff, preceptors and other professionals under all circumstances.
  • Communicate effectively and efficiently with faculty, colleagues, preceptors and all members of the health care team during practicum and other learning experiences.
  • Possess emotional stability to function effectively under stress and adapt to changing environments inherent in the classroom and practice settings.
  • Upon admission, a candidate who discloses a disability and requests accommodation will be asked to provide documentation of his or her disability for the purpose of determining appropriate accommodations, including modification to the program.
The College will provide reasonable accommodations, but is not required to make modifications that would substantially alter the nature or requirements of the program or provide auxiliary aids that present an undue burden to the College. To matriculate or continue in the curriculum, the candidate must be able to perform all the essential functions outlined in the Technical Standards either with or without accommodation.

Prerequisites

Master of Science

Applicants to the M.S. program must have either a Bachelor of Science in Nursing or must be registered nurses with a bachelor’s degree in another field. For applicants who possess a bachelor’s degree in a field other than nursing, please see information on the Post-Baccalaureate RN to MS Certificate in this section of the catalog.

Admission Criteria

Master of Science

Registered nurse applicants to the M.S. program must possess a bachelor’s degree (in nursing or in another field) and have a G.P.A. of 3.0 or higher. Conditional acceptance will be offered to a candidate who presents with a G.P.A. of 2.8 to 2.99 with the understanding that a 3.0 must be achieved by taking six credits of coursework by the end of the first two semesters of enrollment in the program.

Applicants can enroll in either fall, spring or summer, and may begin taking classes (up to six credits) as a non-matriculated student prior to or while in the process of applying to the program.

Post-Master's Certificates

Registered nurse applicants to the post-master's certificate program must hold a bachelor's degree in nursing and a master's degree in nursing or related field and have a G.P.A. of 3.0 or higher.

Applicants may begin taking a course (three credits) prior to or while in the process of applying to the program.

Application Requirements

The following items must be included in the application packet:

• Completed application form

• Nonrefundable application fee:

$50 for the Master of Science in Nursing program

$35 for the post-master’s certificate*

• Official college transcripts

• Two letters of recommendation

• Professional résumé

• Evidence of a current, unencumbered license to practice as an RN in New York state

In addition, the application process requires:

• A personal interview

• An on-site writing sample

Note: The Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is not required but scores may be submitted if they have been taken and the applicant determines that they provide additional evidence of eligibility for graduate study.

Upon receipt of a complete application, qualified candidates will be contacted to schedule an interview.

*If a Post-Master's applicant has graduated from Le Moyne College's master's program, the certificate application fee is waived and only a one-page application form needs to be completed.

Health Clearance

Every student must be in compliance with the health requirements of Le Moyne to maintain matriculation and of each institution or agency in which they fulfill practicum components of their course work.

Conditional Admission

Conditional acceptance may be offered to a candidate who presents with a G.P.A. of 2.8 to 2.99 with the understanding that a 3.0 must be achieved by taking six credits of course work by the end of the first two semesters of enrollment as a non-matriculated student in the program.

Academic Criteria

  1. At least a 3.0 G.P.A. to graduate from the master of science or post-master’s certificate program of study.
  2. A grade of B or better must be earned in all nursing courses. Any grade of a B- or lower requires that a course be repeated.
  3. Withdrawal from a course for academic reasons will count as having taken the course and being unsuccessful in it. Only one course can be repeated and a course can only be repeated once. A grade of B must be earned in theory as well as practicum courses.
  4. Evidence of licensure by the New York State Board of Nursing.
  5. Professional behavior in the classroom, laboratory and practicum settings according to the American Nurses Association’s standards of practice and codes of conduct.
  6. Compliance with the technical standards of performance (provided at the time of application and published in this catalog) that are necessary to gain the knowledge and skills for advanced nursing practice.
  7. Completion of the program within five years of matriculation.

Behavioral Probation

The hallmarks of a nursing professional are to exhibit at all times the behaviors that represent the practice standards and norms of ethical conduct expected of graduate nursing students. A violation of these expected behaviors may result in a decision by the Chair of Nursing and the Dean of Graduate and Professional Studies, in conjunction with the Academic Standards Committee (ASC) of the Department of Nursing, to place a student on behavioral probation for a minimum of at least one semester. Procedures may be found in the Department of Nursing Student Handbook.

In conjunction with the American Nurses Association’s Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretative Statements (2001), examples of professional behaviors include, but are not limited to, demonstrating the following:

  • caring, sensitivity, compassion, tact, integrity, and tolerance towards others
  • written, verbal, and nonverbal communication that conveys respect for clients, self, peers, and faculty
  • responsibility and accountability for all actions, including timeliness to classroom, laboratory, and clinical experiences as well as prompt reporting to meetings with administrators, faculty, advisors, and preceptors
  • appropriate use of technology to maintain client privacy and confidentiality of medical information and to avoid disruptions in learning environments (class, lab, and clinical) as well as in meetings with students, faculty, staff, and colleagues, and to project a professional image on social media venues
  • appearance and conduct that conveys professional demeanor and adheres to institutional policies and procedures
  • remaining free of chemical dependency or substance abuse in classroom, laboratory, and clinical settings

Transfer Credit/Waiver Policy

A student may transfer up to 12 credits of equivalent course work to meet master of science program requirements, but must take 27 credits in the program of study to satisfy College residency requirements. A maximum of two courses can be transferred to satisfy major track requirements. A request for transfer credit to meet degree requirements must be made prior to the date of matriculation. To be granted transfer credit for course work taken at another accredited or state approved college or university, a minimum grade of B must be earned, they must be at least 75 percent equivalent to the required courses in the graduate program of study, and the courses must have been taken within the last seven years. Courses from previous colleges taken at the graduate level more than seven years prior to matriculation may be considered for transfer credit only with approval by the course instructor and department chair if justification of equivalency via a written petition is documented, such as the student has significant practice experience relevant to the major content of the course(s).

Requests for transfer credit must be made in writing to the chair of the Department of Nursing.

Completion of at least nine credits in the post-master’s certificate program of study must be earned at Le Moyne College to satisfy residency requirements. A maximum of three credits of equivalent course work may be transferred to meet the certificate’s program requirements.

Term Limit for Completion

Upon matriculation, a student has five years to complete the degree requirements. A waiver to grant the student extension beyond the five-year limit will be considered on an individual basis depending on the extenuating circumstances.

Probation and Termination

A matriculated student will be placed on academic probation if overall G.P.A. falls below 3.0 during any given semester. A student will be terminated if her/his G.P.A. falls below 3.0 for two consecutive semesters immediately after the student has been placed on probation and/or if a student earns a B- or less in more than one course in the curriculum.

Withdrawal or Leave of Absence

If a student chooses to withdraw or take a leave of absence from the program, she/he should inform her/his faculty advisor or department chair and must complete an enrollment status change form available in the registrar’s office. A leave of absence should be applied for if a student is not planning on taking any courses for one or more semesters. Failure to complete this form will result in an administrative withdrawal from the program and may affect readmission to the College in the future.

Readmission

A student who has withdrawn from the program in good standing may reapply at any time. Reapplication requires completing all admission requirements with the exception of needing only one additional letter of recommendation. Also, a letter stating the reason for requesting re-acceptance must accompany the application materials. The applicant should check with the registrar to find out if original official transcripts are still on file at the College and also submit new transcripts of any additional course work taken since the date of withdrawal.

Advisement

Advisement is a progressive collaborative process that provides for the exchange of confidential information in an atmosphere of safety, respect and privacy. A student must be in contact (in person, via e-mail or by telephone) with her or his advisor at least once per semester to be unblocked for course registration for the following semester. All matriculated nursing students are assigned a full-time faculty member in the department for academic advisement. Availability of advisors is by posted office hours or by appointment.

Master of Science in Nursing

Core Competencies Inherent in M.S. Program

Outcomes

Definition of Core CompetenciesM.S. Program Outcomes
Professional Role Development is an integrative process whereby the individual assumes the characteristics, values, and behaviors associated with a commitment to advanced nursing practice when working collaboratively with the health care team, serving as an advocate for the consumer and functioning within the health care system.The M.S. graduates, demonstrates competencies consistent with advanced professional nursing practice in assuming the multiple dimensions of the specialty practice/functional role in education, administration, gerontology, palliative care or informatics.
Caring is an expression of respect for the dignity and self-worth of individuals by honoring the ethical rights of others and demonstrating sensitivity, equitability and cultural appropriateness in providing services consistent with advanced professional nursing practice.The M.S. graduates apply the principles of ethical and transcultural care in the delivery of advanced level nursing services to others.
Critical Thinking is the cognitive process of decision making that involves collecting, synthesizing, analyzing and interpreting data from multiple sources to question assumptions, reason inductively and deductively, problem solve creatively and evaluate outcomes when dealing with complex and dynamic situations.The M.S. graduates integrate theoretical information from nursing, other disciplines and the liberal arts and sciences to make complex decisions independently and collaboratively when practicing at an advanced level.
Communication is a complex process of sharing information, ideas and perceptions through the use of advanced skills in listening, verbal and non-verbal interactions, writing and multimedia technology to convey logical, organized, clear, accurate, therapeutic and relevant messages to individuals, families, groups, communities and populations. The M.S. graduates incorporate principles of effective communication by using a variety of advanced techniques in a proficient manner when interacting with consumers, peers, other health care providers, policy makers and communities of interest.
Research is the process of identifying new and existing knowledge for application of relevant evidence to improve outcomes.The M.S. graduates demonstrate advanced research skills to initiate change in professional nursing practice.

Typical Program for Educator Track (Full-Time)

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Year I
NSG 5313 MIS 501 or NSG 6973
NSG 5613 NSG 5353
NSG 6253 NSG 5663
Year II
CCM*/EDG Elective**3 NSG 6503
NSG 6123 NSG 7013
NSG 6153 NSG 7101
NSG 6353 NSG 7112

* A 500-level elective, in ethics or human diversity and social issues may be taken from the Consortium for Culture and Medicine (CMM). ** A 500- or 600-level EDG elective may be taken from the Department of Graduate Education or Department of Nursing.

Typical Program for Educator Track (Part-Time)

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Year I
NSG 5313 MIS 501 or NSG 6973
NSG 5613 NSG 5353
Year II
NSG 6253 NSG 5663
NSG 6123 NSG 6503
Summer
CCM*/EDG Elective**3
Year III
NSG 6153 NSG 7013
NSG 6353 NSG 7101
NSG 7112

*A 500-level elective, in ethics or human diversity and social issues may be taken from the Consortium for Culture and Medicine (CCM).

**A 500- or 600-level EDG elective may be taken from the Department of Graduate Education.

Students who complete the master's degree in the educator track are eligible to take the certification exam for nurse educators (CNE).

Typical Program for Administrator Track (Full-Time)

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Year I
NSG 5613 MIS 501 or NSG 6973
BUS 5013 NSG 5353
NSG 6253 NSG 5663
Year II
CCM 500 elective*3 HRM 6013
NSG 6123 NSG 7033
NSG 6153 NSG 7101
NSG 6113 NSG 7112

*A 500-level elective, in ethics or human diversity and social issues may be taken from the Consortium for Culture and Medicine (CCM).

Typical Program for Administrator Track (Part-Time)

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Year I
NSG 5613 MIS 501or NSG 6973
BUS 5013 NSG 5353
Year II
NSG 6253 NSG 5663
NSG 6123 HRM 6013
Summer
CCM elective*3
Year III
NSG 6153 NSG 7033
NSG 6113 NSG 7101
NSG 7112

*A 500-level elective, in ethics or human diversity and social issues may be taken from the Consortium for Culture and Medicine (CCM).

Students who complete the master's degree in the administrator track are eligible to take the certification exam for nurse administrators (CNA)

Typical Program for Informatics Tracks (Full-Time)

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Year I
NSG 5613 MIS 5013
NSG 6973 NSG 5353
NSG 6253 NSG 5663
Year II
CCM 500/Elective*3 NSG 6113
NSG 6123 NSG 7073
NSG 6153 NSG 7101
Selected 500-700 level Elective3 NSG 7112

* CCM 500 selected elective or 500-600 level selected elective for informatics track

Typical Program for Informatics Tracks (Part-Time)

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Year I
NSG 5613 MIS 5013
NSG 6973 NSG 5353
Year II
NSG 6253 NSG 5663
NSG 6123 NSG 6113
Summer
CCM 500/Elective*3
Year III
NSG 6153 NSG 7073
Selected 500-700 level Elective3 NSG 7101
NSG 7112

* CCM 500 selected elective or 500-600 level selected elective for informatics track

Post-Master's Certificates

Five 12-credit post-master's certificate programs in education, administration, gerontology, palliative care or informatics are available to nurses who already hold a master's degree in nursing or in a related field.

Typical Program for Educator Track

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Year I
NSG 5613 NSG 6503
NSG 6353 NSG 7013

Typical Program for Administrator Track

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Year I
MIS 5013 HRM 6013
BUS 5013 NSG 7033

Typical Program for Informatics Track

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Year I
NSG 6113 Selected 500-700 level Elective3
NSG 697 or MIS 5013 NSG 7073

Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) Program

Nurse Practitioners have become the primary care providers for millions of Americans and are poised to meet the challenge of improving the health care of many more millions of people in the changing healthcare market. Family Nurse Practitioners (FNPs) are master's prepared, Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) with expertise in the diagnosis and management of common and complex health conditions across the lifespan. FNPs focus on preventative care and health management. Drawing upon specialized knowledge and clinical competencies as health educators, counselors, researchers, and clinicians, FNPs provide comprehensive care to individuals and families and promote high quality, cost effective health care. FNPs work autonomously as well as in collaboration with other primary care providers and healthcare professionals in the community with the ultimate goal of improving clinical outcomes.

The FNP program provides the student with the academic knowledge and advanced clinical training needed to begin practice as a novice FNP. The program focuses on the development of strong assessment and diagnostic skills sets that, as students advance through clinical courses, are tested at increasingly complex levels. Emphasis is also directed toward the use of research and evidence-based practice to understand and evaluate current prevention strategies, disease management recommendations, and best practice outcomes that are necessary for providing comprehensive health promotion, disease prevention, and management of common acute and chronic illnesses. Successful graduates will hold a FNP Certificate in New York State and will be eligible to sit for the National Family Nurse Practitioner certification exam offered by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP).

The FNP program is designed to concur with the criteria and standards for master’s education as set forth by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) in its Essentials of Master’s Education document as well as the guidelines enacted by the Nursing Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculty (NONPF) in its Nurse Practitioner Core Competencies. The program consists of two parts: graduate level core content (9 credits) and a specialty focus of FNP role (35 credits) for a total of 44 credits. Completion of this FNP curriculum leads to a Master of Science (MS) degree in nursing.

The 44-credit FNP curriculum is designed as a two-year program of study for full-time students and as a three and one-half-year program of study for part-time students.* Application for admission as a matriculated full-time or part-time student is for the Fall semester only. Also, a Post-Master’s Certificate is offered to eligible candidates who have a master’s degree in nursing with another specialty focus. The sequencing of the courses in the curriculum reflects a logical flow of content and consists of a combination of theory, laboratory, and clinical coursework. At the graduate level, the ratio of credits to contact hours is as follows: 1 credit of theory = 1 hour of class time; 1 credit of lab = 2 hours of lab time; 1 credit of clinical = 6 hours of practice experience. A minimum of nine credits of coursework at the graduate level constitutes full-time study and eight credits or less is considered part-time study.

The student must complete a minimum of 810 hours of clinical practice beginning in the second semester of the full-time program of study and beginning in the fourth semester of the part-time program of study, as outlined in the curriculum plans respectively. Clinical hours must be completed in the semester or summer session in which a clinical course is taken. Clinical sites encompass a variety of community-based and acute care practice settings. The clinical hours are allocated based on age/developmental stage requirements of each population group. The following outline indicates the approximate hours required for practice experience with each specific group: 22 – 64 years (adult) = 300 hours; 65 + years (older adult) = 110 hours; 0 – 21 years (child and adolescent) = 200 hours; Women’s Health = 100 hours; Specialty = 100 hours.

* The part-time program of study will not be offered unless a sufficient number of full-time students have been enrolled.

Expectations of Program Graduates

Core competencies, which are built on the standards outlined in the AACN Master’s Essentials as well as the practice guidelines of the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF), provide the foundation upon which the Family Nurse Practitioner master’s curriculum is built. They are consistent with and integral to the mission of Le Moyne College in preparing graduate nurses for leadership and service in a diverse society. These core competencies, which are fundamental to Advanced Practice Nursing, are reflected throughout all of the master’s-level course work and include professional role development, caring, critical thinking, communication, and research. The following outline provides the definitions of these core competencies and illustrates how they are operationalized in the graduate nursing program outcomes.

Core Competencies Inherent in MS Program Outcomes

Definition of Core CompetenciesM.S. Program Outcomes
Professional Role Development: an integrative process whereby the individual assumes the characteristics, values, and behaviors associated with a commitment to advanced nursing practice when working collaboratively and in an interdisciplinary manner with the healthcare team, serving as an advocate for the consumer, and functioning within the healthcare system.The MS graduate, assuming the multiple dimensions of the advanced practice nursing role, demonstrates competencies consistent with AACN Master’s Essentials, and NONPF core practice guidelines.
Caring: expressions of respect for the dignity and self-worth of individuals by honoring the ethical rights of others and demonstrating sensitivity, equitability, and cultural appropriateness in providing services consistent with advanced professional nursing practice.The MS graduate applies the principles of ethical and transcultural care in the delivery of advanced level nursing services to others.
Critical Thinking: the cognitive process of decision making that involves collecting, synthesizing, analyzing, and interpreting data from multiple sources to question assumptions, reason inductively and deductively, problem solve creatively, and evaluate outcomes when dealing with complex and dynamic situations.The MS graduate integrates and processes information from nursing, other disciplines, and the liberal arts and sciences to make complex decisions independently and collaboratively when practicing at an advanced level.
Communication: a complex process of sharing information, ideas, and perceptions through the use of advanced skills in listening, verbal and non-verbal interactions, writing, and multi-media technology to convey logical, organized, clear, accurate, therapeutic, and relevant messages to individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations.TThe MS graduate incorporates principles of effective communication by using a variety of advanced techniques in a proficient manner when interacting with consumers, peers, other healthcare providers, policy makers, and communities of interest.
Research: the process of identifying new and existing knowledge for application of relevant evidence to improve outcomes.The MS graduate demonstrates advanced research skills to initiate change in professional nursing practice.

Program Objectives

It is the expectation that the master’s program will enhance the graduate’s professional growth and development as outlined in the program objectives. These objectives are derived from, elaborated on, and congruent with the program outcomes and reflect expectations of what the students are able to do after graduation. Upon successful completion of the FNP track of the MS degree in nursing program at Le Moyne College, the graduate will be prepared to:

  1. practice in the multi-dimensional Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) role of Family Nurse Practitioner to provide direct care in promoting health and preventing disease in individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations.
  2. synthesize knowledge from nursing, related disciplines, and the liberal arts and sciences for application to practice at the advanced level.
  3. communicate effectively with clients, colleagues, and other health professionals through advanced listening, verbal, non-verbal, and written skills and the proficient use of information technology.
  4. integrate the principles of compassion, ethical decision making, advocacy, and cultural diversity when practicing in the APN role.
  5. integrate research-based findings in professional nursing practice to improve the delivery of health care.
  6. apply advanced critical thinking skills when assessing, diagnosing, planning, implementing, and evaluating treatment outcomes.
  7. demonstrate a high level of decision-making ability and formulate policies and regulations for the effective and efficient use of resources in the delivery of health care.
  8. assume accountability for professional growth and development and improved practice outcomes through scholarship, continuing education, and participation in professional organizations.
  9. apply advanced principles and concepts inherent in the APN role to provide leadership and service for the enhancement of continuous quality improvement in health care.

Technical Standards

Students in the FNP program must be able to meet the technical standards of performance that are listed under the general criteria for the MS program in this section of the Catalog.

Admission Criteria

  1. A cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of 3.3 or higher is required. Conditional acceptance will be offered to a candidate who presents with a GPA of 3.0 to 3.29 dependent upon interview and at the discretion of the Graduate Admissions Committee.
  2. A completed application, including statement of purpose clearly identifying why the applicant wants to pursue the Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) role of the FNP, official transcripts of all colleges/universities attended, and three (3) letters of reference, one each from professional colleagues as follows: (1) an RN peer, (1) a nursing supervisor or faculty member, (1) a Nurse Practitioner or Physician.
  3. Prior to the start of NSG 671: FNP clinical I, the candidate must have completed one year or a full time equivalent of RN nursing practice in Medical-Surgical Nursing in an acute care setting.*
  4. A personal interview with the Director of the Advance Practice Nursing Program and a 500-word essay written spontaneously following the interview on a subject predetermined by the graduate admission committee.
  5. Evidence of unencumbered, current licensure to practice as an RN in New York State.
  6. Current CPR certification and evidence of recent physical exam (within 12 months), up-to-date immunization status, and PPD status.
  7. Graduation from a state-approved baccalaureate program in nursing, or graduation from an associate degree or diploma program in nursing with a bachelor of arts or bachelor of science in another field**, or graduation from an accredited master’s degree program in nursing for students enrolling in the FNP Post-Master’s advanced certificate program.
  8. A professional resume listing relevant educational and work experience.
  9. Completion of basic statistics course or equivalent and an undergraduate Health Assessment course.

*Other RN nursing experience may be considered at the discretion of the Director of the Advanced Practice Nursing Program.

** Post-Baccalaureate RN-MS certificate

Transfer Credit and Residency Requirement Policies

A total of 12 credits may be transferred into the FNP program of study if the courses are deemed equivalent in content and credit load. To fulfill the residency requirement of the Department of Nursing and Le Moyne College as well as to satisfy requirements for the master’s degree in nursing, transfer students must earn the majority of the credits (32 credits) of course work in the graduate curriculum at Le Moyne and meet all other criteria for admission as listed previously. A non-matriculated student may take a maximum of 6 credits prior to enrollment in the FNP track of the MS program.

For transfer credit to be granted for course work taken at another accredited college or university, a grade of “B” must have been earned in a course, the course must be equivalent to the required Department of Nursing course, and the course must have been taken within the last five years. An exception to this time requirement will be considered on an individual basis and a waiver of this requirement is at the discretion of the Director of the Advanced Practice Nursing program and the faculty member responsible for this course content area.

Term Limits for Completion

Upon matriculation, a full-time student has two years to complete degree requirements and a part-time student has three and one-half years to complete degree requirements. A waiver to grant the student an extension will be considered on an individual basis depending on the extenuating circumstances.

Probation and Termination

See general criteria under Master of Science in the Nursing Graduate section of the catalog.

Behavioral Probation

See general criteria under Master of Science in the Nursing Graduate section of the catalog.

Withdrawal or Leave of Absence

See general criteria under Master of Science in the Nursing Graduate section of the catalog.

Readmission

See general criteria under Master of Science in the Nursing Graduate section of the catalog.

Advisement

See general criteria under Master of Science in the Nursing Graduate section of the catalog.

Typical Program for Family Nurse Practitioner (Full-time)

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Year I
NSG 6603 NSG 615*3
NSG 6633 NSG 6253
NSG 6653 NSG 671 (135 hrs.)1.5
NSG 6672 NSG 666**3
Summer
NSG 672 (135 hrs.)1.5
Year II
NSG 6973 NSG 6823
NSG 6813 NSG 674 (270 hrs.)3
NSG 6162 NSG 7091
NSG 673 (270 hrs.)3 NSG 7112
NSG 7101

* Epidemiology is a pre- or co-requisite

** Undergraduate Family Theory Course or Must Take the Family Theory Module

Typical Program for Family Nurse Practitioner (Part-time)

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Year I
NSG 6153 NSG 6603
NSG 6973 NSG 6633
Summer
NSG 6253
Year II
NSG 6653 NSG 671 (135 hrs.)1.5
NSG 6672 NSG 666**3
Summer
NSG 672 (135 hrs.)1.5
NSG 6162
Year III
NSG 6813 NSG 6823
NSG 673 (270 hrs.)3 NSG 674 (270 hrs.)3
Summer
NSG 7101
Year IV
NSG 7091
NSG 7112

* Epidemiology is a pre- or co-requisite

** Undergraduate Family Theory Course or Must Take the Family Theory Module

Typical Program for Post-Master's FNP Certificate

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Year I
NSG 6663 NSG 6721.5
NSG 6733 NSG 6743
NSG 6813 NSG 6823

NOTE: The above schedule is for students who are already an NP in another specialty area.

If not an NP, but with a master’s degree in nursing, the following courses are required:

All courses in the NP track (36 credits).

A total of 12 transfer credits will be granted for core courses and/or NP specialty track courses if these courses taken elsewhere are equivalent and a grade of B or better has been earned.

Courses


NSG 501 . Holistic Stress Management (3).

This course is designed to introduce undergraduate and graduate students to the field of holistic stress management. Stress will be understood from phsiological, psychological, and spiritual dimensions. The impact and role of physical activity, nutrition, sleep, cognitive coping skills, and relaxation techniques will be examined from the perspective of how they support health and prevent and/or alleviate the physical symptoms of stress when caring for self, patients, families, or others. Students will learn comprehensive principles, theories, and skills needed to effectively manage personal stress, and to understand the psychosomatic(mind-body-spirit) relationship. The course will support students to employ a holistic approach to stress management in both their personal and professional lives.

NSG 531 . Advanced Nursing Practice (3).

The purpose of this course is to prepare graduate nurses with higher level knowledge and skills in assessment, diagnostic, reasoning, and management of client problems within a society area of clinical practice. This course is a comprehensive coverage of advanced physiological mechanisms and specific pathologies affecting all of the major organ systems of the human body and advanced health assessment skills with an emphasis on concepts of health promotion, risk management, and disease prevention. The focus is on causality of alternations in human physiological functions in the adult population. Strong emphasis is placed on developing sound clinical decision-making abilities based on an understanding advanced pathophysiology. The concepts of normal physiology and pathological phenomena as a result of altered states of health are contrasted. The human physiological responses to various diseases and disorders are examined in detail from the micro (cellular) and macro (organ) level. Diagnostic tests, laboratory values, and treatment methods pertinent to identifying and managing these alterations in health are discussed. Course assignments are laboratory practice activities enhance the student's history taking, physical assessment, and critical thinking skills essential for planning, delivering, and evaluating health care.

NSG 535 (BSC 435). Epidemiology (3).

This course will serve as an introduction to epidemiology as a basic science for public health and clinical medicine. Epidemiological principles and methods are presented with emphasis on the health status and health needs of a population, on levels of prevention, on susceptibility, communicability, and modes of transmission, and on promotion of health using various strategies. Statistical measures are applied to describe the incidence and prevalence of disease, fertility rates, morbidity and mortality rates, heatlh beliefs and behaviors, socioeconomic, ethnic and racial disparities, causality of disease and disability, and risk factors for the purpose of evidence-based decision making in public health. (Note: This course is not open to students who have taken BSC 435 as undergraduates at Le Moyne College.)

NSG 545 (PSY 445). Psych of Grief: Current Under & Interven (3).

This course examines the experience of individuals and families in the face of death and loss. The course will focus on the nature and causes of grief as well as strategies for effective counseling interventions. There will be an emphasis on loss due to death however, other types of psychosocial and physical losses will also be considered. Accordingly, we will explore a variety of factors that facilitate or impede the grief process. The course will initially trace the development of dominant models of grief and their historical and theoretical underpinnings. Considerable emphasis will be on examining the grief process as it is played out in the context of family. The family is seen as an interactive system, with a complex mix of actions, perceptions and expectations that influences the experience of grief among family members. This course will also consider a postmodern view of bereavement as a complex phenomenon embedded in a unique context involving social, cultural, philosophical and psychological factors. The second half of the course will have a distinct practitioner emphasis by connecting theoretical understandings to practicial applications and interventions.

NSG 561 (NSG 461). Principles of Teaching and Learning (3).

The focus of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to educate various audiences in a variety of settings with efficiency and effectiveness. It is a comprehensive coverage, both in scope and depth, of the essential components of the education process and the principles of teaching and learning. Designed to increase students' proficiency in educating others, it takes into consideration the needs and characteristics of the learner as well as how to choose and use the most appropriate instructional techniques and strategies by which to optimize learning. The theories and concepts addressed in this course can be applied to any audience of learners, whether they are patients and their families, staff nurses or student nurses. An understanding of the basics of teaching and learning allows the educator to function in the role as a "guide by the side" and as a "facilitator" of learning, rather than merely as a "giver of information". This approach enables the audience of learners to act as responsible partners in the teaching/learning process. Emphasis is placed on preparing students to assess, teach, and evaluate learners of all stages of development based on their learning needs, learning styles, and readiness to learn. Not open to students who have taken NSG 461. If NSG 461 or its equivalent has been completed, a graduate level 3-credit education elective must be substituted to meet master's degree in nursing requirements.

NSG 566 . Contemp Issues in Healthcare Leadership (3).

The focus of this course is on the role of the evolving leadership of skills of the master's prepared nurse at various levels of authority and in different practice settings in dealing with a myriad of issues and challenges in a changing and complex world of healthcare delivery. Through a review of leadership paradigms, organizational structure, and current healthcare regulations, students have the opportunity to explore the responsibility and accountability of the master's prepared nurse to internal and external stakeholders. Interprofessional collaboration, development of leadership functions, the influence of technology resources, adherence to ethical and legal standards, advocacy for change or maintaining tradition, and the influence of policy decisions at all levels are considered. Also discussed are issues related to quality improvement, negotiating conflict, personnel and fiscal management, and shared governance models. Skills essential to leadership include communication, collaboration, negotiation, delegation, and coordination.

NSG 590-599 . Independent Study (1-6).

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and the goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure, and the number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair, and the Dean. It will be kept on file in the office of the Dean.

NSG 609 . Clinical Teaching in Nursing Education (3).

This course will assist nurse educators to develop skills to teach in the unique environment of the clinical and learning laboratory setting. The student will apply theory of teaching and learning to assess the needs and learning style of students in clinical and learning laboratory settings and design meaningful experiences to meet course and clinical objectives. The course will focus the student on making appropriate assignments, designing pre and post conferences, and evaluating student performance. Special situations including selection of preceptors, working with a culturally diverse student and patient population, and managing agency staff expectations will be explored. Legal, ethical and human resource issues will be discussed.

NSG 611 (MIS 460/CSC 460/MGT 460/MIS 711). Managing Systems Project (3).

This course focuses on introductory project management processes, technology and tools, utilizing the Project Management Institute's (PMI) Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) and the Software Engineering Institute's (SEI's) Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) processes and nomenclature. Students examine the processes and theory of project management as well as industry case studies, and will utilize project management software in support of their management activities. Guest speakers and field research provide students with access and information from industry and academia. Students are engaged in a semester-long project. Initially, they are required to identify the project scope and team charter for their project; subsequent assignments require them to prepare a business case, work breakdown structure, cost estimate, and final project documentation for their project.

NSG 612 . Health Issues in an Aging Society (3).

This course explores the health and wellness issues encountered by a growing numbers of Americans entering late-life years. Healthy aging as well as common illnesses faced by this population will be explored from physiological, psychological, economic, and spiritual perspectives, including emphasis on end-of-life preparation and care. Individualization of care planning based on cultural norms,ethnicity, and moral concerns of the client and family will be incorporated. Discussion of the capacity of the health care system, in particulat the professional knowledge and skills of nurses, to meet the needs of this growing segment of society will be discussed. Also, focus will be placed on policy to support productive and healthy aging, choices in end-of-life care, and the role of nurses and nursing in advancing these goals.

NSG 615 . Advanced Research (3).

This course reviews the research process and focuses on analyzing and evaluating research at the advanced level of nursing practice. Principles of scientific inquiry, including identification of nursing and multidisiplinary theorectical and conceptual frameworks, are used to delineate research questions and uncover evidence for the continuous improvement of nursing practice. Expected competencies include the identification, analysis, and synthesis of research findings related to clinical practice and health care outcomes. Emphasis is on the translation of research to support and inform practice inovations. A basis understanding by the student of the research process, terminology, and statistics is assumed. Prerequisite of undergraduate research course and basic statistics course.

NSG 616 . Research Application (2).

The exploration and application of research and evidence-based practice (EBP) for advanced practice nursing is the focus of this course. Students will identify practice problems and determine the best way to address those problems after conducting an in-depth search of the evidence-based literature, and after appraising and synthesizing those research findings. Methods for performing a comprehensive literature search and analyzing multiple sources for practice guidelines are emphasized. EBP implementation models will be used by students to explore practice questions and present change. Students will acquire the skill set necessary to identify a practice problem, search for available literature, determine an appropriate practice change, implement that change, and monitor for outcomes with the goal of improving quality in the healthcare environment. Prerequisite: NSG 612.

NSG 625 . Health Care Delivery Systems (3).

This course focuses on formal and informal heath care systems within American communities by addressing their historical development, the major forces shaping their present status, and emerging directions of these systems. Throughout the course, the implications for the roles and actions of nurses within health care organizations are explored with respect to planning, policy formulation, financing, and evolving methods of delivering services to clients. Within a rapidly changing health care environment, it is imperative that students understand the actual and potential role of nursing at the local, state, and national levels from the perspective of geographic influences, socio-cultural demands, and environmental stressors impacting on communities and on the available health care systems. Current health care reform issues, concepts and models of health care delivery, directions for change, and methods affecting organizational change on individuals, groups, as well as the nursing profession will be examined and discussed. The purpose of this course is to prepare nurses as leaders in managing various resources for the delivery of quality, cost-effective care.

NSG 635 . Curriculum and Program Development (3).

The purpose of this role course is to further develop the knowledge and skills of the nurse as educator. Although the emphasis is on preparing faculty for an academic role, the principles are applicable for nurse educators in staff development, in-service, and continuing education. Thus, the competencies and responsibilities of the educatior in a variety of settings are explored. Ethical, legal, political, social, economic, and professional standards issues are examined as they impact on the education process and influence curriculum and program development. Students are given the opportunity to design, apply, and critique creative teaching and learning strategies as well as to develop outcome criteria as measure to evaluate the success of educational programs and curriculum plans. As a culminating aspect of this course, students examine both the entrepreneurial roles of the nurse educator and how to negotiate an educator position through the use of marketing and interviewing techniques. Seminar and other adult learning approaches are used to foster critical thinking and active participation. Prerequisite: NSG 461 or NSG 561.

NSG 636 . Palliative Care Concepts (3).

The focus of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to provide high quality, specialist-level palliative care to patients and families as they experience life limiting illness. The students will gain and understanding of the history and pracitce of palliative care in the United States and other world countries. This course will address advanced communication skills critical in end of life care. Symptom management including physical, psychological, social and spiritual distress will be examined, and strategies to manage these issues will be assessed. An understanding of the role of the advanced practice nurse in palliative care will provide students with the abilty to function as a critical member of the interdisciplinary team. In addition students will conduct an analysis of policy factors relevant to palliative care and its future directions.

NSG 640 . Physiological Changes in Aging (3).

This course will focus on the human aging process from a physiological perspective with emphasis on the changes that result in environmental modifications to keep the older adult safe, healthy and productive. Major theories of aging will be explored in relation to common health problems faced by the older adult. Particular emphasis will be placed on concepts of pharmacology and the issues of medications and drug use in the older adult. Special pharmacological problems created by the aging process will able be discussed. Students will use the nursing process to develop plans of care to promote healthy behaviors in the older adult and educate the client, family, and significant others on environmental and lifestyle modifications that may assist the older adult to remain independent and healthy.

NSG 650 . Educational Assessment & Evaluation (3).

This course focuses on the role of the nurse educator in assessing and evaluating the learner (nursing students and nursing staff) from the beginning to the completion of an academic program or other type of education endeavor, such as staff development, in-service, and continuing education programs. A major emphasis is on exploring creative assessment and valuation strategies, using various methodologies to determine learner performance in classroom, laboratory, and clinical settings. The assessment and evaluation processes include exploring topics related to recruitment, admission, progression, retention, and graduation of learners. A major emphasis is on test development, which involves techniques for writing and critiquing different types of examination items as well as scoring, grading, and determining the reliability and validity of tests. Students critically examine issues, policies, procedures, and current research data in education by actively participating in seminars, individual or small group project, class presentations, and other adult learning approaches. Through the development of knowledge and skills, students are expected to gain a broad perspective on the role of the nurse as educator. Prerequisites: NSG 461 or NSG 561.

NSG 660 . Advanced Pathophysiology (3).

This course builds on foundational knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and basic pathophysiology obtained through undergraduate coursework. Alterations of various physiological systems that are frequently encountered in primary care are explored from a lifespan perspective. A case study approach is used to analyze risk factors, pathophysiological changes, signs and symptoms of disease processes, and disease outcomes. Current and appropriate screening and diagnostic evaluative methods are also reviewed to enhance critical thinking and assist the student in developing diagnostic reasoning and clinical management skills.

NSG 663 . Advanced Pharmacology (3).

The mission of the Department of Nursing, consistent with the mission of Le Moyne College, is to educate nurses at the undergraduate and graduate levels to provide the highest quality nursing service and professional leadership. The nursing curricula, integrating liberal arts and sciences and the culture of Catholic and Jesuit tradition at Le Moyne, aim to prepare nurses to serve as practitioners and leaders in a diverse world of health care for the new century. Graduates are prepared as life-long learners who are future oriented; responsive to the challenges of a dynamic healthcare environment; possess well-developed communication, critical thinking, and technical skills; and demonstrate professional, caring, and competent behaviors that reflect the standards and values of nursing.

NSG 665 . Advanced Health Assessment I (3).

This course, which serves as the foundation for the Advanced Practice Nursing clinical coursework, focuses on the development of comprehensive, advanced health assessment skills, diagnostic reasoning, and management of common problems in the adult population. Course assignments, laboratory practice, and the use of Observed Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) and case studies enhance the student's communication and interviewing skills, complex bio-psycho-social assessment, and critical thinking skills essential for planning, delivering, and evaluating health care. Emphasis is placed on the synthesis of assessment data to arrive at differential diagnoses. Students learn to present patient histories and exam findings in a concise and effective manner.

NSG 666 . Advanced Health Assessment II (3).

This course, the second in a sequence of clinical courses, builds upon concepts introduced in Advanced Health Assessment I. Theoretical and clinical foundations for comprehensive health assessment through the lifespan from birth through senescence are emphasized. The course furthers the development of the advanced practice role as students apply their physical assessment and diagnostic reasoning skills across diverse populations with increasing competence, confidence, and leadership. The focus of the course is on the comprehensive biopsychosocial assessment of populations from pediatrics (infants, school age children, and adolescents), through reproductive health, and geriatrics, as well as the management of commonly encountered problems in these populations. Emphasis is placed on age appropriate assessment techniques, the identification of normal and abnormal findings, the development of differential diagnoses, and the development of management plans that include teaching strategies that focus on prevention and anticipatory guidance. Course assignments, laboratory practice, and the use of Observed Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) and case studies refine the student's communication and interviewing skills, comprehensive assessment skills, and critical thinking skills essential for planning, delivering, and evaluating health care of individuals and families. Pre-requisite:NSG 665: Advanced Health Assessment I.

NSG 667 . Advanced Practice Nursing Role (2).

This course introduces students to the history, ethical standards, and development of the various roles of the Advanced Practice Nurse (APN). The professional, organizational, and scope of practice requirements for each role are explored. APN role transition, certification, and professional activities are examined as they relate to the profession of nursing. Select theories and practices from nursing and related disciplines are integrated to provide a foundation for the graduate student to transition into the advanced practice role and to provide comprehensive care to diverse populations.

NSG 671 . FNP Clinical I (1.5).

This is the first clinical rotation in a progressive sequence of Advanced Practice Nursing clinical courses for the Family Nurse Practitioner student. The course focuses on the practice and refinement of clinical history taking and assessment skills in an adult, primary care population under the supervision and guidance of a clinical preceptor. Students gain proficiency with presenting concise and accurate patient histories and exam findings to their preceptors. Emphasis is placed on early diagnostic reasoning whereby students begin to develop differential diagnoses and formulate the plan of care. Students are required to complete 135 hours of supervised clinical practice in this course. Pre / Co-requisites: NSG 660: Advanced Pathophysiology, NSG 663: Advanced Pharmacology, NSG 665: Advanced Health Assessment I, and NSG 667: Advanced Practice Nursing Role.

NSG 672 . FNP Clinical II (1.5).

This is the second clinical rotation in a progressive sequence of Advanced Practice Nursing clinical courses for the Family Nurse Practitioner student. The course focuses on the practice and refinement of clinical history taking and assessment skills in a primary care family population under the supervision and guidance of a clinical preceptor. Students perform age-appropriate, comprehensive and focused histories and physical exams in pediatrics, adolescent, and adult reproductive health, and geriatrics. Students continue to gain proficiency with presenting concise and accurate patient histories and exam findings to their preceptors. Additionally, students work independently on diagnostic reasoning skills to develop differential diagnoses and formulate the plan of care for their preceptors' review. More emphasis is placed on patient education with a focus on anticipatory guidance and prevention. Students are required to complete 135 hours of supervised clinical practice. Pre-requisites: NSG 671: FNP Clinical I

NSG 673 . FNP Clinical III (3).

This is the third clinical rotation in a progressive sequence of Advanced Practice Nursing clinical courses for the Family Nurse Practitioner student. The course, which must be taken simultaneously with NSG 681, focuses the diagnosis and management of common acute and chronic health problems that occur in the family population across the lifespan. Students are expected to gain proficiency with performing histories and physical exams, developing differential diagnoses, and a prescribing a plan of care for each patient. Students present each patient and the management plan to their preceptors for review. Emphasis is placed on professional collaboration and interdisciplinary consultation with other health professionals, teaching patients and families, and using evidence-based practice to prescribe and evaluate therapeutic interventions. Students must complete 220 hours of clinical for this course.Pre-requisite: NSG 672: FNP Clinical II. Co-requisite: NSG 681: Health & Illness Management I.

NSG 674 . FNP Clinical IV (3).

This is the final clinical rotation in a progressive sequence of Advanced Practice Nursing clinical courses for the Family Nurse Practitioner student. The course, which must be taken simultaneously with NSG 682, continues to focus on the diagnosis and management of acute and chronic health problems in the family population, however more emphasis is placed on the student's independent management of increasingly complex patients. Students are expected to be proficient with performing histories and physical exams, developing differential diagnoses, and prescribing a plan of care for each patient. Students present each patient and an independently formed management plan to their preceptors for review. Emphasis is placed on professional collaboration and interdisciplinary consultation with other health professionals, teaching patients and families, accountability and patient advocacy, and using evidence-based practice to prescribe and evaluate therapeutic interventions. Students must complete 220 hours of clinical for this course. Pre-requisite: NSG 673: FNP Clinical III. Co-requisite: NSG 682: Health & Illness Management II.

NSG 680 . Care Transitions (3).

This course will explore the movement of patients and families/caregivers between health care providers, different levels of care, and healthcare settings during the course of chronic or acute illnesses. Care transitions will provide the learner with insight into the critical role of the registered professional nurse as the coordinator of the healthcare team in the development of a culturally competent, comprehensive patient and family/caregiver-centered complex plan of care. This includes assessing and addressing the level of engagement in self-management and "compliance." Current validated models used to optimize transitions in care and improve client outcomes, such as readmission rates and medication errors, will be introduced along with principles of adult learning, how to identify health literacy and literacy deficits, and how to tailor appropriate education into daily practice.

NSG 681 . Health & Illness Management I (3).

This course, which must be taken simultaneously with NSG 673, is designed to prepare the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) student with a theoretical and practice foundation for evaluating and managing common disorders across the lifespan using a family-centered approach. Building upon knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology and advanced health assessment, students advance critical thinking skills by synthesizing assessment data to formulate differential diagnoses and management plans. Emphasis is placed on diagnosis and management of commonly occurring acute and chronic health problems from a lifespan perspective. Students practice and refine their assessment and diagnostic skill sets under the supervision of clinical faculty in the lab, and clinical preceptors in the field. Simultaneously, the student continues to develop in the role of the Advanced Practice Nurse through professional collaboration and consultation with other health professionals, teaching patients and families, and by using evidence-based practice to prescribe and evaluate therapeutic interventions. Seminars, clinical topic discussions, tests, case studies, OSCEs, and clinical practicum experiences further refine the student's communication, comprehensive assessment, and critical thinking skills essential for planning, delivering, and evaluating health care of individuals and families. Pre-requisite:NSG 666: Advanced Health Assessment II Co-requisite:NSG 673: FNP Clinical III.

NSG 682 . Health & Illness Management II (3).

This course, which must be taken simultaneously with NSG 674, is a continuation of NSG 681 and is designed to prepare the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) student with a theoretical and practice foundation for evaluating and managing common disorders across the lifespan using a family-centered approach. Building upon knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, advanced health assessment, and concepts learned in NSG 681, students advance critical thinking skills by synthesizing assessment data to independently formulate differential diagnoses and management plans. Students integrate knowledge and practicum experiences in primary, secondary and tertiary preventive care interventions of patients and families. Emphasis is on the care for persons with acute and chronic issues throughout the lifespan. Students experience a variety of care settings as they continue to practice and refine their assessment and diagnostic skill sets under the supervision of clinical faculty in the lab and clinical preceptors in the field. Simultaneously, the student continues to develop in the role of the advanced practice nurse through professional collaboration and consultation with other health professionals, teaching patients and families, accountability to and advocacy for patients and families, and by using evidence-based practice to prescribe and evaluate therapeutic interventions. Seminars, clinical topic discussions, tests, case studies, OSCEs, and clinical practicum experiences further refine the student's communication, comprehensive assessment, and critical thinking skills essential for planning, delivering, and evaluating health care of individuals and families. Pre-requisite: NSG 681: Health and Illness Management I. Co-requisite: NSG 674 FNP Clinical IV.

NSG 690-699 . Special Topics in Nursing (3).

This series of courses provide the opportunity for the study of content specifically related to nursing and health care that is not included in regularly scheduled course offerings. Courses designated as such will explore professional topics and issues of particular interest to students and faculty. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Pass/fail.

NSG 697 (NSG 387/MIS 450/MIS 710). Health Information Systems (3).

This course provides students with the knowledge of the design, use, and evaluation issues of health informatics applications. The topics include:(1) health informatics as a discipline; (2) career options for health informatics; (3) major health applications and commercial vendors; (4) strategic information systems planning and project management; and (5) new opportunities and emerging trends. A semester-long group will provide students hands-on experience in planning healthcare information systems; associated ethical and legal concerns, software engineering and human-computer interaction issues, and user acceptance and outcomes evalutation methods will also be discussed.

NSG 701 . Teaching Practicum (3).

This nurse educator role course provides the student with an in-depth opportunity to explore and apply teaching and learning theories, concepts, and skills previously acquired in the program to an educational setting. Under the guidence of a faculty member and an expert preceptor, the student will actively participate in the development, implementation, and evaluation of teaching/learning activities during a semester-long practicum experience. The student is expected to establish a specific set of objectives to be accomplished, observe a model teacher, create teaching plans and material based on the moste current research data, enagage in teaching audiences of learners on content pertinent to her/his area of clinical specialization, attend curriculum and faculty meetings, develop and analyze examination items, and conduct a self-evaluation of the practicum experience. The student is expected to complete 180 hours of practicum (2 creditis = 10 hours per week for 12 weeks). Students also will attend a total of 15 hours of seminar and individual meetings with the instructor during the semester to discuss and share teaching and learning experiences in their professional role as educators. Prerequisite: NSG 635 and Prerequisite or Corequistite: NSG 650

NSG 702 . Palliative Care Clinical Pract (3).

This course provides the student with an in-depth opportunity to explore the role of the principles of palliative care and apply the knowledge and skills of this specialty practice area in a clinical setting of patients with terminal illness. Under the guidance of a faculty member and an expert preceptor, the student will actively participate in the needs of patients and families coping with terminal illness and plan, implement, and evaluate care during a semester-long clinical practicum experience. The student is expected to establish a specific set of objectives to be accomplished, work alongside a nurse expert in the field of palliative care, integrate the most current research data in the development of palliative of care plans, engage in interdisciplinary collaboration to ensure coordinated and comprehensive patient care, and evaluate the achievement of patient and family goals of care. The student is expected to complete 180 hours of practicum (2.5 credits = 15 hours per week (6 hours/credit) for 12 weeks). Students will also attend 12-15 hours of seminar and individual meetings with instructor during the semester to discuss and share teaching/learning experiences in their advanced professional role as providers of care to terminally ill patients and their families.

NSG 703 . Administrative Practicum (3).

This nurse administrator role course provides the student with an in-depth opportunity to explore and apply management and leadership theories, concepts, and skills previously acquired in the program to a health care setting. Under the guidance of a faculty member and an expert preceptor, the student will actively participate in the development, implementation, and evaluation of administrative activities during a semester-long practicum experience. The student is expected to establish a specific set of objectives to be accomplished, observe a model nursing administrator, attend organizational meetings, explore issues related to human resource management and quality care delivery, select an administrative problem and carry out appropriate approaches to decision making and problem solving, and conduct a self-evaluation of the practicum experience. The student is expected to complete 120 hours of practicum (2 credits = 10 hours per week for 12 weeks). Students will also attend a total of 15 hours of seminar and individual meetings with the instructor during the semester to discuss and share management and leadership experiences in their professional role as administrators.

NSG 704 . Gerontology Clinical Practicum (3).

This course provides students with an in-depth opportunity to explore the principles of healthy aging and the care of older adults. In a clinical setting, they will have the oppportunity to apply the knowledge and skills about older adults' growth and development, health promotion, disease prevention, and physiological aging. Under the guidance of a faculty member and an expert preceptor, the student will actively participate in the needs assessment of older adult clients and families and plan, implement, and evaluate care during a semester-long clinical practicum experience. The student is expected to establish a specific set of objectives to be accomplished, work alongside a nurse expert in the field of gerontology, integrate the most current research data in the development of plans of care, engage in interdisciplinary collaboration to ensure coordinated and comprehensive patient care, and evaluate the achievement of patient and family goals of care. The student is expected to complete 180 hours of practicum (2.5 credits = 15 hours per week (6 hours/credit) for 12 weeks). Students will also attend 12-15 hours of seminar and individual meetings with instructor during the semester to discuss and share teaching/learning experiences in their advanced professional role as providers of care to older adults.

NSG 706 . Scholarly Project Continuation ().

This course is non-credit bearing and is designed for students who are not able to complete NSG 705 within one semester. This course will allow students to remain connected with a faculty advisor and also to continue their access to Le Moyne College resources. NSG 706 may be taken just one times and must be taken in the next available semester. Upon registering for NSG 706, the students will be charged an administrative fee. In the event NSG 706 cannot be completed in one semester, the student will need to re-register for NSG 705 with a new project proposal.

NSG 707 . Nursing Informatics Practicum (3).

This course provides the student with an in-depth opportuntity to explore the role of the nurse in health informatics in the practice setting. The student will apply knowledge of information systems, information processes, and nursing care delivery to assess system utility in meeting the care needs of patients and the information needs of providers and organizations. Under the guidance of a faculty member and an expert preceptor, the student will actively participate in the needs assessment of patients and providers for information, plan for systems changes, and implement and evaluate system applications. The student is expected to establish a specific set of objectives to be accomplished, work alongside a nurse expert in the field of informatics, integrate the most current research data in the development of plans for information process changes and systems, and engage in interdisciplinary collaboration to ensure coordinated and comprehensive patient care. The student is expected to complete 120 hours of practicum (2 credits = 10 hours per week (5 hours/credit) for 12 weeks). Students will also attend 12-15 hours of seminar and individual meetings with instructor during the semester to discuss and share teaching/learning experiences in their advanced professional role in informatics.

NSG 709 . Adv. Practice Nursing Capstone (1).

This is the culminating seminar for students in the Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) role. It provides the student the opportunity to summarize, evaluate, and integrate their experiences as they transitioned from RN to novice APN. Emphasis is placed on practice issues related to enhancing the APN role in healthcare settings and in the community at large, exploring job negotiation strategies, and examining the role of the clinical preceptor. Requirements for state and national certification and federal reimbursement are reviewed.

NSG 710 . Scholarly Project I (1).

This pre-capstone course requires the student to demonstrate the ability to synthesize information acquired in the graduate core, the area of concentration, and the specialty practice/functional role courses in developing a scholarly project proposal. Students must choose a topic related to their role and are expected to work under the direct supervision of a faculty member to organize and complete their Scholarly Project proposal, secure Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, if necessary, and establish a realistic timeline for implementation of their Scholarly Project in NSG 711. A seminar format and individual advisement with the faculty sponsor will be the approach used to assist students to accomplish these expectations. Prerequisites: Practicum course completed in program.

NSG 711 . Scholarly Project II (2).

This capstone course requires the student to demonstrate the ability to synthesize information acquired in the graduate core, area of concentration, and specialty practice/functional role courses in carrying out this project. The student must have already decided on a topic related to their role as reflected in the draft proposal completed in NSG 710 and now the student must individually design, implement, analyze, and evaluate a new activity or creative approach that reflects an advanced level of knowledge and skills in their area of concentration. Also, the student must demonstrate well-developed abilities in decision making and problem solving as well as a solid understanding of the research process, socio-cultural issues, ethical dilemmas, and organizational systems for health care delivery. The student is expected to work under the direct supervision of a faculty member to organize and complete this written assignment. This project must demonstrate the student's ability to produce a scholarly paper that is relevant to nursing practice and that is of publishable quality. Prerequisites: NSG 710. Co-requisites: NSG 701, NSG 702, NSG 703, NSG 704, or NSG 707.

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