Physics

Chair: David Craig
Professor(s): George Coyne
Associate Professor(s): Stamatios Kyrkos
Assistant Professor(s): Christopher Bass
Visiting Assistant Professor(s): Dennis W. Sullivan


Physics

Physics is the foundation of all natural science. Its development over the centuries has yielded a precise quantitative discipline that has served not only as a model for the younger sciences, but is also basic to a fuller understanding of chemical and biological phenomena and contemporary technological advances.

For students who wish to major in physics, two degrees are available: the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science. The courses required for the Bachelor of Arts introduce students to a broad range of subjects in physics and serve as a foundation for future careers in fields such as science writing, patent law, medicine, teaching, philosophy of science, technical marketing, technology management and computational science. Several specific variations of the Physics B.A. are available. Please see the program director.

The courses required for the Bachelor of Science are for students seeking a professional background in physics or pursuing the 3-2 or bachelor's/master's dual degree engineering program. These courses provide advanced undergraduate physics and laboratory experience, including the option of independent research with a member of the physics faculty. The first three years of the curriculum include the courses needed by students who plan to pursue dual physics and engineering bachelor degrees through one of the 3-2 Engineering Programs. The 3-2 Engineering Programs are fully described in the section of this catalog devoted to Undergraduate Transfer Programs.

The physics B.A. or B.S. with one of the pre-engineering concentrations described below serve as the foundation for the physics-based bachelor’s + master’s engineering degree programs with Syracuse University. See the section of this catalog devoted to Undergraduate Transfer Programs.

The Physics Bachelor of Arts/Master of Science in Teaching (Physics B.A./M.S.T.) course of study makes it possible to earn a physics B.A. and a master’s degree in secondary education, including preliminary certification, in five years. Further information about this course of study can be obtained from the program director.

Further information on these courses of study can be found on the physics and engineering Web pages, www.lemoyne.edu/physics and www.lemoyne.edu/engineering.

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

Physics Major B.A.

Major RequirementsHours
PHY 103 General Physics Laboratory 1
PHY 104 General Physics Laboratory 1
PHY 105-106 General Physics for Scientists and Engineers I & II (preferred) or PHY 101-102 Non-Calculus General Physics I & II 6
PHY 200-499 Major Electives 6
PHY 201 Fields and Waves 3
PHY 203 Foundations of Modern Physics 3
PHY 231 Experimental Foundations Modern Physics 1
PHY 303 Classical Electromagnetic Theory I 3
PHY 307 Quantum Mechanics I 3
PHY 321 Analytical Mechanics I 3
PHY 331 Atomic & Nuclear Physics Laboratory 1
PHY 476 Physics Capstone 3
PHY/Other Technical Electives 9
Major SupportHours
MTH 145 Calculus I 4
MTH 146 Calculus II 4
MTH 245 Calculus III 4
ElectivesHours
Free Electives 21

Physics Major B.S.

Major RequirementsHours
PHY 103 General Physics Laboratory 1
PHY 104 General Physics Laboratory 1
PHY 105-106 General Physics for Scientists and Engineers I & II (preferred) or PHY 101-102 Non-Calculus General Physics I & II 6
PHY 200-499 Major Electives 6
PHY 201 Fields and Waves 3
PHY 203 Foundations of Modern Physics 3
PHY 231 Experimental Foundations Modern Physics 1
PHY 303 Classical Electromagnetic Theory I 3
PHY 307 Quantum Mechanics I 3
PHY 308 Quantum Mechanics II 3
PHY 311 Electronics I 4
PHY 321 Analytical Mechanics I 3
PHY 331 Atomic & Nuclear Physics Laboratory 1
PHY 333 Computational Physics 3
PHY 405 Statistical Physics 3
PHY 431 Advanced Physics Lab or PHY 441 Research Project 1-3
PHY 476 Physics Capstone 3
PHY/Other Technical Electives* 3
Major SupportHours
MTH 145 Calculus I 4
MTH 146 Calculus II 4
MTH 245 Calculus III 4
MTH 303 Differential Equations and Mathematical Modeling 3
CHM 151 Chemical Principles I 3
ElectivesHours
PHY/Other Technical Electives* 3
Free Electives 6
*Technical Electives (NOTE: Courses on this list required for a degree will not count twice as an elective.)
BSC 105 Exercise Physiology3
CHM 151 Chemical Principles I3
CHM 152 Chemical Principles II3
CHM 327 Physical Chemistry I3
CHM 328 Physical Chemistry II3
CHM 331 Physical Chemistry Laboratory1
CHM 332 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory1
CSC 175 Introduction to Algorithms and Program Design4
CSC 253 Programming With Java3
ENG 397 Writing Nonfiction:3
ENG 422 Literature and Science3
MTH 261 Linear Algebra3
MTH 312 Mathematical Statistics3
MTH 332 Real Analysis4
MTH 303 Differential Equations and Mathematical Modeling3
MTH 341 Abstract Algebra3
MTH 361 Modern Geometry3
MTH 421 Numerical Methods3
MTH 431 Introduction to Complex Analysis3
MTH 481 Topology3
ESS 205 Physical Geology4
PHL 312 Symbolic Logic3
PHL 362 Theory of Knowledge3
PHL 364 Philosophy of Science3
PHL 352 Critical Theory & Technological Society3
PHS 120 Astronomy3
PHS 128 Cosmology:Sci of Phys Universe3
PHS 275 Photography and Photometry3
PSC 340 Science Technology and Society3
REL 318 Religion and Science3

PHY 3XX/4XX Upper-level physics electives are also considered technical electives.

Other courses not on the above list may also be approved as technical electives by the program director. For students in the bachelors-masters engineering program with Syracuse University, many engineering courses at Syracuse University will qualify.

Typical Program for Physics Major B.A.***

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
HST 1103 PHL 1103
MTH 1454 HST 1113
PHY 1031 MTH 1464
PHY 1053 PHY 1041
COR 1003 PHY 1063
WRT 1013
Sophomore Year
MTH 2454 ENG 2103
PHY 2013 PHY 2033
PHL 2103 PHY 2311
EAC3 EAC3
Elective3 Elective3
Elective3
Junior Year
IDS3 PHY Elective3
PHY 3073 Theology3
PHY 3311 Technical Elective3
ENG 3103 Technical Elective3
Elective4 Elective3
Technical Elective3
Senior Year
PHY 4763 PHY 3213
PHY 3033 Elective3
Elective3 Social Science3
Religion3 COR 400A3
PHY Elective3

Most PHY 300- and PHY 400-level courses, except PHY 476, are offered in alternate years, so students graduating in odd-numbered years follow a program in which the third and fourth years of PHY courses are interchanged.

Typical Program for Physics Major B.A., M.S.T.***

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
HST 1103 HST 1113
EAC3 EAC3
MTH 1454 MTH 1464
PHY 1031 PHY 1041
PHY 1053 PHY 1063
Sophomore Year
Theology3 PHL 2103
MTH 2454 PHY 2033
PHY 2013 PHY 2311
ENG 2103 PHY 3213
Technical Elective3 Elective3
Junior Year
Religion3 PHL 301-3033
Technical Elective3 ENG 3103
PHY 3311 PHY Elective3
PHY 3073 Technical Elective3
Opt: Elec/CHM 327/3313/4 Opt: Elec/CHM 328/3323/4
Senior Year
COR 400A3 EDG 5053
PHY 4763 EDG 5153
PHY 3033 EDG 5303
Elective3 EDG 5453
PHY Elective3
Summer I
EDG 5003
Fifth Year
EDG 5503 EDG 6544.5
EDG 5653 EDG 6564.5
EDG 5704
Science Technology Lab1
EDG 5803
Summer II
EDG 6953
EDG 5603

Most PHY 300- and PHY 400-level courses, except PHY 476, are offered in alternate years, so students graduating in odd-numbered years follow a program in which the third and fourth years of PHY courses are interchanged.

Typical Program for Physics Major B.S.***

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
HST 1103 HST 1113
MTH 1454 MTH 1464
PHY 1053 PHY 1063
PHY 1031 PHY 1041
COR 1003
Sophomore Year
PHL 2103 ENG 2103
Technical Elective3 PHY 2033
PHY 2013 PHY 2311
MTH 2454 PHY 3213
EAC3 MTH 3033
EAC3
Junior Year
PHY 3073 PHY 3083
PHY 3311 PHY 3114
CHM 1513 PHY 3333
CHM 151L1 Theology3
IDS3 Elective2
ENG 3103
Senior Year
PHY 3033 COR 400A3
PHY 431/4411/3 PHY 4053
PHY 4763 Elective3
Elective3 Social Science3
Religion3

Most PHY 300- and PHY 400-level courses, except PHY 476, are offered in alternate years, so students graduating in odd-numbered years follow a program in which the third and fourth years of PHY courses are interchanged.

Physics Minor

Required courses for a minor in physics include:

PHY 105-106 (preferred) or PHY 101-102

PHY 103-104

MTH 145-146

PHY 201

PHY 203

PHY 231

For a total of nine courses with 23 credit hours.

Physics B.A.: Pre-Medical Course of Study

Physics B.A.: Pre-Medical Course of Study

Within this course of study it is possible to fulfill the requirements for a minor in both biology and chemistry.

Typical Program for Physics B.A.: Pre-Medical Course of Study

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
HST 1103 PHL 1103
MTH 1454 HST 1113
CHM 1513 MTH 1464
CHM 151L1 CHM 1523
PHY 1053 CHM 152L1
PHY 1031 PHY 1063
COR 1003 PHY 1041
WRT 1013
Sophomore Year
MTH 2454 PHL 2103
CHM 2233 ENG 2103
CHM 223L1 CHM 2243
PHY 2013 CHM 224L1
BIO 1914 PHY 2033
PHL 2103 PHY 2311
EAC3 BIO 1924
EAC3
Junior Year
IDS3 Elective3
PHY 3073 Elective3
PHY 3311 Theology3
ENG 3103
Elective3
Senior Year
PHY 3033 COR 400A3
PHY 4763 PHY 3213
CHM 4621 Social Science3
Religion3 Elective3
Elective3

(1) BIO 218 may be replaced by an elective unless seeking a minor in biology.

(2) Either BIO 225 or CHM 460 (biochemistry), when taken with BIO 218, meet the requirements for a minor in biology.

(3) CHM 462 Biochemistry lab is not required for CHM 460 Biochemistry.

Physics-based Engineering Concentrations

Physics with Concentration in Pre-Engineering (Civil with Structural focus)

Physics with Concentration in Pre-Engineering (Civil with Geotechnical focus)

Physics with Concentration in Pre-Engineering (Electrical)

Physics with Concentration in Pre-Engineering (Environmental)

Physics with Concentration in Pre-Engineering (Mechanical and Aerospace)

Students enrolled in one of the physics-based bachelor’s + master’s engineering programs with Syracuse University must choose the appropriate concentration.

Typical Program for B.S. in Physics with Concentration in Pre-Engineering: Civil with Structural focus

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
PHY 103*1 PHY 104*1
PHY 105*3 PHY 106*3
MTH 145*4 MTH 146*4
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
HST 1103 HST 1113
COR 1003
Sophomore Year
PHY 2013 ENG 2103
PHY 215*/ECS 221**3 PHY 2033
MTH 245*4 PHY 2311
Theology3 PHY 321*3
PHL 2103 MTH 303*3
ECS 325**4
Junior Year
PHY 3311 PHY 3333
PHY 3073 PHL 301-3033
CHM 151*3 CIE 332**3
CHM 151L*1 PHY 3114
CIE 331**3 PHY 3083
ENG 3103 EAC3
EAC3
Senior Year
PHY 3033 PHY 401*3
PHY 431/4411/3 PHY 405*3
PHY 4763 COR 400A3
IDS3 Social Science3
CIE 337**3
Religion3

* Satisfies pre-requisites for admission to master’s program.

** Taken at Syracuse University.

Most PHY 300- and PHY 400-level courses, except PHY 476, are offered in alternate years, so students graduating in odd-numbered years follow a program in which the third and fourth years of PHY courses are interchanged.

Typical Program for B.S. in Physics with Concentration in Pre-Engineering: Civil with Geotechnical focus

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
PHY 103*1 PHY 104*1
PHY 105*3 PHY 106*3
MTH 145*4 MTH 146*4
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
HST 1103 HST 1113
COR 1003
Sophomore Year
PHY 2013 ENG 2103
PHY 215*/ECS 221**3 PHY 2033
MTH 245*4 PHY 2311
Theology3 PHY 321*3
PHL 2103 MTH 303*3
ECS 325**4
Junior Year
PHY 3311 PHY 3114
PHY 3073 PHY 3083
CHM 151*3 PHY 3333
CHM 151L*1 EAC3
CIE 337**4 CIE 338**3
ENG 3103
EAC3
Senior Year
PHY 3033 PHY 401*3
PHY 431/4411/3 PHY 405*3
PHY 4763 COR 400A3
IDS3 Social Science3
MAE/CIE 341**4
Religion3

* Satisfies pre-requisites for admission to master’s program.

** Taken at Syracuse University.

Most PHY 300- and PHY 400-level courses, except PHY 476, are offered in alternate years, so students graduating in odd-numbered years follow a program in which the third and fourth years of PHY courses are interchanged.

Typical Program for B.S. in Physics with Concentration in Pre-Engineering: Electrical focus

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
PHY 103*1 PHY 104*1
PHY 105*3 PHY 106*3
MTH 145*4 MTH 146*4
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
HST 1103 HST 1113
COR 1003
Sophomore Year
PHY 2013 ENG 2103
MTH 111*4 PHY 2033
MTH 245*4 PHY 2311
ELE 231**3 PHY 3213
ELE 291**1 MTH 303*3
PHL 2103 ELE 232**3
ELE 292**1
Junior Year
PHY 3311 PHY 3083
MTH 311*3 PHY 3333
ENG 3103 IDS3
ELE 331**3 ELE 333**3
PHY 3073 ELE 346**3
EAC3 EAC3
Senior Year
PHY 303*3 PHY 401*3
PHY 431/4411/3 PHY 4053
PHY 4763 COR 400A3
CHM 151*3 ELE 352**3
CHM 151L*1 Social Science3
Theology3 Religion3
ELE 351**3

* Satisfies pre-requisites for admission to master’s program.

** Taken at Syracuse University.

Most PHY 300- and PHY 400-level courses, except PHY 476, are offered in alternate years, so students graduating in odd-numbered years follow a program in which the third and fourth years of PHY courses are interchanged.

Typical Program for B.S. in Physics with Concentration in Pre-Engineering: Environmental focus

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
PHY 103*1 PHY 104*1
PHY 105*3 PHY 106*3
MTH 145*4 MTH 146*4
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
HST 1103 HST 1113
COR 1003
Sophomore Year
PHY 2013 ENG 2103
MTH 245*4 PHY 2033
CHM 151*3 PHY 2311
CHM 151L*1 PHY 3213
Theology3 MTH 303*3
PHL 2103 CHM 1523
CHM 152L*1
Junior Year
PHY 3311 PHY 3083
PHY 3073 PHY 3114
CIE 341**3 PHY 3333
EAC3 CIE 352**4
ENG 3103 EAC3
Senior Year
PHY 3033 PHY 401*3
PHY 431/4411/3 PHY 405*3
PHY 4763 COR 400A3
Religion3 Social Science3
IDS3
CIE 442**4

* Satisfies pre-requisites for admission to master’s program.

** Taken at Syracuse University.

Most PHY 300- and PHY 400-level courses, except PHY 476, are offered in alternate years, so students graduating in odd-numbered years follow a program in which the third and fourth years of PHY courses are interchanged.

Typical Program for B.S. in Physics with Concentration in Pre-Engineering: Mechanical and Aerospace focus

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
PHY 103*1 PHY 104*1
PHY 105*3 PHY 106*3
MTH 145*4 MTH 146*4
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
HST 1103 HST 1113
COR 1003 ENG 2103
Sophomore Year
PHY 2013 PHY 2033
PHY 215*/ECS 221**3 PHY 2311
MTH 245*4 PHY 321*3
MTH 261*3 EAC3
EAC3 MTH 303*3
ECS 325**4
Junior Year
PHY 3073 PHY 3083
PHY 3311 PHY 3114
MTH 311*3 PHY 333*3
PHL 2103 IDS3
ECS 326**3 MAE 321**3
ENG 3103
Senior Year
PHY 3033 PHY 405*3
PHY 431/4411/3 COR 400A3
PHY 4763 ELE 512**3
CHM 151*3 Social Science3
CHM 151L*1 Theology3
MAE 315**1 Religion3
MAE 341**4

* Satisfies pre-requisites for admission to master’s program.

** Taken at Syracuse University.

Most PHY 300- and PHY 400-level courses, except PHY 476, are offered in alternate years, so students graduating in odd-numbered years follow a program in which the third and fourth years of PHY courses are interchanged.

Courses


PHS 120 . Astronomy (3).

A survey of modern astronomy. Planets, stars, galaxies and the present scientific view of the universe and its origin are discussed. No prerequisites. Three lecture hours weekly.

PHS 128 . Cosmology:Sci of Phys Universe (3).

Participants in this course will engage in a tour of the universe as we presently understand it and gain a much broader understanding of where we live. They will consider the scientific evidence available regarding the origin and future of the universe. They will consider the implications of this knowledge, and they will consider the questions that this knowledge raises. They will also see the process by which scientific knowledge is established, and they will encounter the limitations of the present state of our knowledge.

PHS 275 . Photography and Photometry (3).

This course explores those aspects of physics which relate to photography. It covers the basic properties of light, ray optics, infra red film and the visible spectrum, light polarization, lens optics, and the relationship of color film to light source. It also covers the digital camera and its components, and digital black and white printing. It provides students with an understanding of the relationship between physics and photography. No prerequisites. A compact digital camera or digital SLR camera is required. This course counts for core science credit.

PHY 101 . Non-Calculus General Physics I (3).

An elementary course in physics with topics selected from mechanics of solids and fluids, kinetic theory, and heat. A thorough knowledge of high school algebra and trigonometry is a prerequisite. Because of the integration between PHY 101 and PHY 103, PHY 103 must be taken concurrently.

PHY 102 . Non-Calculus General Physics II (3).

A continuation of PHY 101 with topics selected from waves, electromagnetic theory, and optics. General Physics I (either PHY 101 or PHY 105) and PHY 103 are prerequisites. Because of the integration between PHY 102 and PHY 104, PHY 104 must be taken concurrently.

PHY 103 . General Physics Laboratory (1).

The activities of these laboratory courses are designed to give students taking PHY 101-102 and PHY 105-106 direct experience with the fundamental concepts that are the subjects of those courses, making these laboratory courses an integral part of PHY 101-102 and PHY 105-106. A thorough knowledge of high school algebra and trigonometry is a prerequisite. PHY 103 is a prerequisite for PHY 104. One two-hour laboratory period each full week of classes each semester.

PHY 104 . General Physics Laboratory (1).

The activities of these laboratory courses are designed to give students taking PHY 101-102 and PHY 105-106 direct experience with the fundamental concepts that are the subjects of those courses, making these laboratory courses an integral part of PHY 101-102 and PHY 105-106. A thorough knowledge of high school algebra and trigonometry is a prerequisite. PHY 103 is a prerequisite for PHY 104. One two-hour laboratory period each full week of classes each semester.

PHY 105 . General Physics Scientists/Engineers I (3).

An introduction to physics and the use of calculus in physical problems. Topics are selected from mechanics of solids and fluids, kinetic theory and heat. Previous experience with calculus, either in high school or college, or concurrent enrollment in college-level Calculus I is required. Because of the integration between PHY 105 and PHY 103, PHY 103 must be taken concurrently.

PHY 106 . General Physics Scientists/Engineers II (3).

A continuation of PHY 105 with topics selected from waves, electromagnetic theory and optics. PHY 105 and PHY 103 are prerequisites. Because of the integration between PHY 106 and PHY 104, PHY 104 must be taken concurrently. Concurrent enrollment in college-level Calculus II is desirable but not required.

PHY 201 . Fields and Waves (3).

An introduction to the physics of fields and waves, focusing primarily on electric and magnetic fields and electromagnetic waves. May include physical optics. Prerequisites: Calculus 11 (MTH 146) and General Physics II (either PHY 102 or PHY 106).

PHY 203 . Foundations of Modern Physics (3).

Introduction to the pillars of modern physics: special relativity and quantum mechanics. Includes an historical account of the theoretical and experimental development of quantum theory and an introduction to its concepts and methods. Additional topics may include, but are not limited to, the quantum physics of atoms, molecules, and solids, and contemporary applications. Prerequistites: Calculus II (MTH 146) and General Physics II (either PHY 102 or phy 106). Prior completion of PHY 201 is desirable but not required.

PHY 215 . Statics (3).

A course in that branch of mechanics which deals with particles or bodies in equilibrium under the action of forces or torques. It embraces the composition and resolution of forces, the equilibrium of bodies under balanced forces and such properties of bodies as center of gravity and moment of inertia. Prerequisites: General Physics II (either PHY 102 or PHY 106) and Calculus II (either MTH 146 or MTH 152).

PHY 231 . Experimental Foundations Modern Physics (1).

Introduction to experimental methods in physics through experiments measuring fundamental properties of light and matter. Topics may include, but are not limited to, analysis of experimental data and propagation of uncertainties computer-aided data acquisition, and an introduction to instrumentation. Experimental topics may include, but are not limited to, the mass and charge of the electron, the speed of light, Planck's constant, properties of lasers and laser light, concepts of photon interference and quantum measurement, resonance and chaos in dynamical systems. One three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Calculus II (MTH 146), General Physics II (PHY 102 or PHY 106). Prior completion of PHY 201 is strongly desirable but not required. Corequisite: PHY 203.

PHY 280 (LIB 280/CHM 280). Info in Chem & Physical Sciences (1).

This course will introduce the changing information landscape in chemistry and the physical sciences to help students become effective database and "free web" searchers. Students will also become familiar with the social and ethical issues relation to the production and use of scientific information in an increasingly digital society.

PHY 303 . Classical Electromagnetic Theory I (3).

An advanced undergraduate course in classical electromagnetic theory. PHY 303 covers vector calculus, electrostatics and magnetostatics. PHY 304 is primarily devoted to electromagnetic dynamics and, time allowing, applications. Prerequisites: A course in differential equations (MTH 303 or MTH 304), PHY 201, and PHY 203.

PHY 304 . Classical Electromagnetic Theory II (3).

An advanced undergraduate course in classical electromagnetic theory. PHY 303 covers vector calculus, electrostatics and magnetostatics. PHY 304 is primarily devoted to electromagnetic dynamics and, time allowing, applications. Prerequisites: A course in differential equations (MTH 303 or MTH 304), PHY 201, and PHY 203.

PHY 307 . Quantum Mechanics I (3).

Topics are selected from, but not limited to, the quantum nature of reality, the Schroedinger equation, square-well potentials, the simple harmonic oscillator, tunneling, angular momentum, the hydrogen atom and the periodic table. Prerequisites: A course in differential equations (MTH 303 or MTH 304), PHY 201, and PHY 203.

PHY 308 . Quantum Mechanics II (3).

Continuation of PHY 307, focusing on applications. Topics covered include, but are not necessarily restricted to, time-independent perturbation theory, variational principles, approximation, time-dependent preturbation theory, and scattering.

PHY 311 . Electronics I (4).

A course in scientific (as opposed to consumer) analog electronics. Topics include use of electronic test equipment, circuit theory, analog applications of discrete passive and active devices and analog integrated circuits. Op-amp applications (amplifiers, adders, integrators, differentiators, active inductors, oscillators, active filters, etc.) are the primary interest. Other integrated circuits such as voltage regulators, function generators, multipliers and phase locked loops may be introduced as time allows. Prerequisites: Calculus II (MTH 146 or MTH 152) and General Physics (PHY 102 or PHY 106). Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory period per week.

PHY 312 . Electronics II (4).

A course in scientific (as opposed to consumer) digital electronics. Topics include use of electronic test equipment, digital applications of discrete passive and active devices, digital integrated circuits (gates, decoders, flip-flops, counters, shift-registers, digital memory, clocks), and analog/ digital hybrids such as comparators, analog switches and gates with Schmitt trigger inputs. Applications include bus interfacing, multiplexing, wave shaping, digitalto-analog conversion and analog-to-digital conversion. Prerequisites: Calculus II (MTH 146 or MTH 152) and General Physics (PHY 102 or PHY 106). Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week.

PHY 321 . Analytical Mechanics I (3).

An advanced undergraduate course treating mechanics in the Newtonian, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations with applications. Prerequisite: PHY 201. Prerequisite or corequisite: MTH 303 or MTH 304 and PHY 203.

PHY 322 . Analytical Mechanics II (3).

An advanced undergraduate course treating mechanics in the Newtonian, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations with applications. Prerequisites: A course in differential equations (MTH 303 or MTH 304), PHY 201, and PHY 203.

PHY 331 . Atomic & Nuclear Physics Laboratory (1).

Experimental topics are drawn from, but not limited to, microwave optics and the physics of the nucleus. Prerequisite: PHY 203. One three-hour laboratory period each week for one semester.

PHY 333 . Computational Physics (3).

An introduction to computer techniques and simulations emphasizing problem solving in physics and the use of statistical, differential, integral, graphical, and numerical methods. Examples will be drawn from classical, statistical, and quantum mechanics and will include numerical integration, differentiation, and the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, using programs such as Exel, Maple, Matlab, Mathematica etc. Prerequisites: MTH 145 and MTH 146. Corequisite: MTH 245.

PHY 390 . Independent Study in Physics (1-3).

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration, a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure and number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair and the academic dean. It will be kept on file in the dean of arts and science's office.

PHY 399 . Independent Study (3).

PHY 401 . Mathematical Physics (3).

Topics are selected from, but not limited to, matrix algebra, complex analysis, Fourier series and Fourier analysis, classical functions of mathematical physics (orthogonal polynomials, Bessel functions, gamma function,...) and applications. Prerequisites: General Physics 11 (PHY 102 or PHY 106) and a course in differential equations (MTH 303 or MTH 304).

PHY 403 . Physical Optics (3).

An intermediate course in physical optics, designed for senior physics majors, treating interference, diffraction, absorption, polarization and other aspects of electromagnetic wave phenomena. Prerequisite: PHY 303.

PHY 405 . Statistical Physics (3).

This course deals with statistical methods applied to systems of particles, statistical thermodynamics and the statistical treatment of quantized systems. Applications to diverse topics such as ideal and non-ideal gases, black body radiation, metallic conduction and magnetic effects are developed. Prerequisite: PHY 203. Prerequisite or corequisite: PHY 321.

PHY 407 . Condensed Matter Physics (3).

Structure and binding of solids, electrical, magnetic and optical properties. Prerequisite or co-requisite: PHY 307.

PHY 408 . Nuclear Physics (3).

Problems of nuclear forces, structure and stability, nuclear reactions. Prerequisite: PHY 307.

PHY 431 . Advanced Physics Laboratory (1).

Experimental topics are selected from, but not limited to, x-ray physics and applications such as atomic shell structure and crystal structure. Prerequisite: PHY 203. One three-hour laboratory period each week for one semester.

PHY 441 . Research Projects in Physics (1-3).

A laboratory course designed to apply the principles and techniques of experimental and/or theoretical physics to a senior project. The student engages in one or more research projects under the direction of one of the staff. One equivalent laboratory period per credit weekly for one year. Prerequisite/corequisite: PHY 280.

PHY 476 . Physics Capstone (3).

Capstone to the physics major. Independent research in collaboration with a faculty supervisor. (The nature of the project will vary with student interests and goals and faculty resources, but may include library research, creative work, theoretical or computational research, or laboratory work.) Students will give formal oral presentations on their research and wrtie a comprehensive thesis on the work. Open to senior majors in physics and others with the consent of the program director. May be pursued in conjunction with honors theses if the projects are compatible with the requirements of each program, and with the prior consent of both programs. For students in the Bachelors-Masters engineering program with Syracuse University, may be pursued in conjunction with engineering projects at Syracuse if compatiblie with the requirements of each program, and with the prior consent of the program director. (Such projects must also have a Le Moyne College faculty supervisor.) Open to senior majors in physics and others with the consent of the program director.

PHY 490 . Physics Internship (1-6).

Participation in a field learning experience related to the area of physics. The student will report as required to the faculty member assigned to supervise this field experience and is expected to evaluate the experience and relate it to his or her academic program. Three hours of field work per week for 14 weeks will be required to generate one credit. Prerequisites: junior standing and permission of the department chair.

PHY 491 . Physics Internship (1-6).

Participation in a field learning experience related to the area of physics. The student will report as required to the faculty member assigned to supervise this field experience and is expected to evaluate the experience and relate it to his or her academic program. Three hours of field work per week for 14 weeks will be required to generate one credit. Prerequisites: junior standing and permission of the department chair.

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