English

Chair: Jim Hannan
Professor(s): Kathleen P. Costello-Sullivan , Alan B. Fischler, Julie Grossman, Patrick Lawler, David T. Lloyd, Roger D. Lund, Mary A. Maleski, Julie Olin-Ammentorp, Linda Pennisi, Ann M. Ryan, J. Christopher Warner
Associate Professor(s): Maura Brady, Michael Davis, Jennifer Gurley, Elizabeth Hayes, Erin E. Mullally, Anca V. Munteanu, Philip P. Novak, Miles Taylor
Assistant Professor(s): Matthew Dowell
Professor Emeritus: Gordon V. Boudreau, Patrick J. Keane, Cornelius Novelli
Adjunct(s): Timothy D. Burns, Rae Ann Meriwether, Greg Sevik


The Department of English offers two concentrations of study: literature and creative writing. Both of these courses of study are committed to the discovery of meaning and value in language—a commitment that is grounded in contemporary academic and professional concerns within English as well as in humankind’s enduring traditions of self-expression, speculative inquiry, and social communication through literature and the rhetorical arts. In particular, the department’s two concentrations are designed to involve students in challenging and rewarding encounters with literary works representing a variety of types and time periods; to expand students’ awareness of the range, the subtlety, and the power of language; to help students develop their own expressive powers in language; to assist them toward increasingly mature syntheses of literature with other disciplines and life experiences; and to prepare students for careers, professions, and graduate study in which a command of the English language and literature are necessary.

Departmental Honors

In accord with guidelines approved by the academic dean, department chairs, and program directors (Fall 1988), the English Department offers degrees in honors for literary studies and for creative writing. These programs have been designed for:

  • the student who excels primarily in the major and who deserves further challenge and recognition,
  • the student who does not surface as honors material in time to join the Integral Honors Program and
  • especially competent transfer students.

The chair will invite eligible students to apply for departmental honors by the junior year. Requirements for the degree include a 3.0 overall G.P.A. and a 3.5 G.P.A. in English Department courses.

Literary Studies

Students who choose to pursue the English honors degree in literary studies will complete and defend an honors project according to the following schedule:

Junior year: The candidate will define a topic, write a proposal, and choose a mentor who will guide him or her through the development of an honors project. While most students will choose to accomplish a lengthy research paper, some may decide to do a creative, artistic project.

The proposal should include: a topic or title, a thesis, a plan for accomplishment, and a working bibliography. This proposal needs to be approved by the mentor before the spring dates for fall registration; the student will then register for ENG 480 (Honors Project).

Senior year: The student works on the project with the guidance of the mentor. It is the student’s responsibility to set up and keep a weekly appointment with the mentor and to work consistently toward the completion of the project. The mentor will send a brief progress report to the chair of the department at the end of the fall semester. The student may then gain permission to register for another three credits (ENG 480) for the spring semester if doing so is useful and necessary.

By April 1, the student will give a copy of the completed project to each of the following: the mentor, the department chair, the director of the Integral Honors Program, and the members of an oral examination committee (this will be set up by the mentor, with the approval of the department chair).

With the help of the mentor, the student will arrange a place and time for the defense. The mentor will communicate that information to all members of the department and the director of the Integral Honors Program. This date should allow time for any revisions necessary after the defense. The mentor, in consultation with the chair and the project committee, will decide whether the candidate meets both departmental and school wide standards.

Honors Degree in Creative Writing

The English department also offers an Honors Degree in Creative Writing designed for:

  • the student who excels in one or more creative writing genres;
  • the student who deserves further challenge and recognition and
  • especially competent transfer students.

The program director will invite eligible students to apply for honors in creative writing by the junior year. Requirements include a 3.0 overall G.P.A. and a 3.5 G.P.A. in creative writing program courses. Those accepted will enroll in CRW 480 (Honors Tutorial in Creative Writing) and work towards completion of a high quality manuscript of poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, a play at least 50 pages, or mixed genres - the length to be determined by the honors mentor.

See also the general description of departmental honors programs above.

English Major

English majors may follow the curriculum for the literature concentration, the creative writing concentration, or one of five literature and education tracks designed for students earning an English major with teaching certification. Students in the education tracks also have the option of adding the creative writing concentration to their degree. The literature and creative writing concentrations must be declared by the end of the junior year. Students must declare one of the literature and education tracks and apply formally to the education program no later than the end of their sophomore year; however, they are strongly encouraged to do so earlier since fulfilling the requirements will demand careful planning in scheduling courses. Double major programs in theatre and literature and in theatre and creative writing are also available. Please see visual and performing arts for more information.

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

Literature Concentration

Note: English majors cannot fulfill ENG 210 with Shakespeare. They may take any other major authors.

Major RequirementsHours
ENG 218 Critical Perspectives on Literature 3
ENG 318 Shakespeare *3
ENG 305 Eng Lit Survey I:thru Milton 3
ENG 306 Eng Lit Survey II:Rest-Present 3
ENG 350 Amer Lit Survey I:to Civil War or ENG 351 Amer Lit Survey II: Civil War - Present3
English Department Electives : Students must take two period courses (one must focus upon a period before 1789), two topic courses and two genre courses. The remaining elective may be an ENG/CRW/CMM elective.21
Major SupportHours
Foreign Language** 9
Free Electives 30

* Only ENG 218 is a prerequisite for subsequent literature courses, but it is strongly recommended that students complete ENG 318 as early as possible in the major program.

** The nine hours must be in one language. If, however, after a minimum of six hours of language at the College level a student has completed or advanced beyond the mid-intermediate level (103), he or she may substitute an English elective for the remaining hours. Additionally, students who complete Latin 101 & 102 may choose to complete their foreign language requirement with a classical literature course.

Creative Writing Concentration

In the creative writing program students have the opportunity to develop their talents along with others who share their love of writing. Emphasizing both experimentation and craft, classes are designed as writing workshops—providing a balance of individual attention and group critiques to help students explore their powers and potentials as writers. Major requirements for the creative writing concentration differ from the literature concentration in two respects:

  1. one period elective is required instead of two, and it must be in post 1789 literature;
  2. four elective courses are required in Creative Writing (CRW), as described below (the remaining three courses may be in ENG, CRW and/or CMM).

The four required CRW electives are writing workshops. Current options include Creative Writing Workshop, Script Writing, Advanced Fiction Workshop, Advanced Poetry Workshop, Introduction to Playwriting, Writing the One Act Play, Nonfiction Writing Workshop, various Special Topics courses, and the Independent Study. Any workshop may be repeated once for credit. The major is listed on the student’s transcript as “English (Creative Writing concentration).” Course selection must be made in consultation with the student’s advisor. If the advisor is not part of the creative writing teaching faculty, the student should additionally consult with the director of the creative writing program.

Typical Program for Literature Concentration

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
COR 1003 ENG 2103
WRT 1013 HST 1113
HST 1103 EAC**3
Math/Nat. Science3 Math/Nat. Science3
EAC**3 PHL 1103
Sophomore Year
ENG 2183 ENG P/T/G Elective***3
Social Science3 ENG 3183
EAC**3 PHL 2103
Elective3 ENG P/T/G Elective***3
Elective3 Elective3
Junior Year
ENG 3053 ENG 3063
ENG 350/ENG P/T/G Elective*3 ENG 351/ENG P/T/G Elective*3
ENG 310/Elective3 Elective/ENG 3103
IDS3 Elective3
ENG P/T/G Elective***3 ENG P/T/G Elective***3
Senior Year
Religion/COR 4003 Religion/COR 4003
ENG P/T/G Elective***3 ENG P/T/G Elective***3
ENG P/T/G Elective***3 ENG/CMM/CRW3
Elective3 Elective3
Elective3 Elective3

*English Majors are required to take either ENG 350 or ENG 351, not both. If you intend to take ENG 351 in the spring, you may take an ENG/CRW/CMM elective in the fall; if you have taken ENG 350 in the fall, you may take an ENG/CRW/CMM elective in the spring.

** FLL 101-102, 103-104, or 201-202

*** Period/Topic/Genre

Typical Program for Creative Writing Concentration

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
COR 1003 ENG 2103
WRT 1013 HST 1113
HST 1103 EAC**3
Math/Nat. Science3 Math/Nat. Science3
EAC**3 PHL 1103
Sophomore Year
ENG 2183 Elective3
Social Science3 ENG 3183
EAC**3 PHL 2103
CRW3 Elective3
Elective3 Elective3
Junior Year
ENG 3053 ENG 3063
ENG 350/ENG Elec*3 ENG 351/ENG Elec*3
ENG 3103 Elective3
IDS3 ENG Period (Post 1789)3
CRW3 CRW3
Senior Year
Religion/COR 4003 Religion/COR 4003
Elective3 CRW3
ENG/CMM/CRW3 ENG/CMM/CRW3
Elective3 Elective3
Elective3 Elective3

*English Majors are required to take either ENG 350 or ENG 351, not both. If you intend to take ENG 351 in the spring, you may take an ENG/CRW/CMM elective in the fall; if you have taken ENG 350 in the fall, you may take an ENG/CRW/CMM elective in the spring.

** FLL 101-102, 103-104, or 201-202

B.A. in English and Initial Teacher Certification Tracks

Students earning teacher certification fulfill the core requirements as described above but follow one of the programs of study detailed below. Note that all five tracks require one advanced writing course and one media literacy elective. Any upper-division course in writing satisfies the requirement for the advanced writing course, but students are encouraged to make their selection according to their teaching interests—e.g., Creative Writing Workshop (CRW 385) for those who wish to prepare themselves to teach creative writing; Fundamentals of Journalism (CMM/ENG 374) for those who anticipate teaching journalism classes or advising their school newspaper. The media literacy elective is fulfilled by CMM 250 or one of the film studies courses offered by the English Department.

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

Literature Concentration and Dual Childhood Special Education

(133 credit hours)

Core RequirementsHours
Includes EDU 105 which fulfills social science (see below under Education) 52
Major RequirementsHours
Advanced Writing Course 3
Department Electives (Must take two period courses (one must focus on a period before 1789). Students must additionally take two topic courses; one topic elective must be ENG 352. Students must also take two genre courses.)18
ENG 301 Advanced Grammar and Usage 3
ENG 311 English Literature: An Overview 3
ENG 318 Shakespeare 3
ENG 350 Amer Lit Survey I:to Civil War (or ENG 351)3
Media Literacy Elective 3
Major SupportHours
Foreign Language** 9
Education and Education Support Courses (see details under Education program requirements; this total includes a course in mathematics required for teacher certification, but it does not include EDU 105, which satisfies the College core social science requirement)39

** The nine hours must be in one language. If, however, after a minimum of six hours of language at the College level a student has completed or advanced beyond the mid-intermediate level (103), he or she may substitute an English elective for the remaining hours. Additionally, students who complete Latin 101 & 102 may choose to complete their foreign language requirement with a classical literature course.

Literature Concentration and Adolescent Education

(134 credit hours)

Core RequirementsHours
Includes EDU 105 which fulfills social science (see below under Education) 52
Major RequirementsHours
Advanced Writing Course 3
Department Electives (Must take one pre-1789 period course. Students must additionally take two topic courses, one of which must be a world/multicultural literature course (ENG 323, 327, 340, 382, or 383). Students must also take two genre courses)15
ENG 301 Advanced Grammar and Usage 3
ENG 305 Eng Lit Survey I:thru Milton 3
ENG 306 Eng Lit Survey II:Rest-Present 3
ENG 318 Shakespeare 3
ENG 350 Amer Lit Survey I:to Civil War (or ENG 351)3
Media Literacy Elective 3
Major SupportHours
Foreign Language** 9
Education and Education Support Courses (see details under Education program requirements; this total includes a course in mathematics required for teacher certification, but it does not include EDU 105, which satisfies the College core social science requirement)40

** The nine hours must be in one language. If, however, after a minimum of six hours of language at the College level a student has completed or advanced beyond the mid-intermediate level (103), he or she may substitute an English elective for the remaining hours. Additionally, students who complete Latin 101 & 102 may choose to complete their foreign language requirement with a classical literature course.

Literature Concentration and Dual Adolescent/Special Education

(137 credit hours)

The core and major requirements for this concentration are identical to those for English and adolescent education (see above). An additional three credit hours of coursework are required in education (see details under education program requirements).

Literature Concentration in English and TESOL Education

(127 credit hours)

Core RequirementsHours
Includes EDU 105 which fulfills social science (see below under Education) 52
Major RequirementsHours
Advanced Writing Course 3
Department Electives (Must take one period course that focuses on a period pre-1789. Students must additionally take two topic courses, one of which must be a world/multicultural literature course (ENG 323, 327, 340, 382, or 383). Students must also take two genre courses) 9
ENG 301 Advanced Grammar and Usage 3
ENG 311 English Literature: An Overview 3
ENG 318 Shakespeare 3
ENG 350 Amer Lit Survey I:to Civil War (or ENG 351)3
Media Literacy Elective 3
Major SupportHours
Foreign Language (Of the 12 hours required, nine must be in one language. The remaining three credits may be in the same or in a second foreign language. Additionally, students who complete Latin 101 & 102 may choose to complete their foreign language requirement with a classical literature course.)12
Education and Education Support Courses (see details under education program requirements; this total includes a course in mathematics required for teacher certification, but it does not include EDU 105, which satisfies the College core social science requirement)40

Adding a Creative Writing Concentration to the Literature and Education Tracks

Students in any of the education tracks may add the creative writing concentration as an addition to the literature concentration by taking the following:

1. three CRW genre-specific workshop courses (one of which fulfills the advance writing course requirement);

2. one of the following advanced workshop courses (each of which includes extensive study of contemporary texts) to fulfill the 20th/21st century historical period requirement*: ENG/CRW 387 Scriptwriting, ENG/CRW 389 Writing the One-Act Play, ENG/CRW 391 Advanced Poetry, ENG/CRW 392 Advanced Fiction, or ENG/CRW 395 Nonfiction Writing Workshop.

* A student is allowed to take a 20th/21st century historical period elective other than ENG/CRW 395, but in this case a fourth CRW workshop is required.

Five-Year B.A./M.S.T. Programs

Bachelor of Arts in English and Master of Science for Teachers in Adolescent English Education or Master of Science for Teachers in Dual English Adolescent and Special Education, Grades 7-12

The English and Education Departments at Le Moyne College are partnering to offer two specially designed programs leading to a Bachelor of Arts in English, a Master of Science in Teaching (M.S.T.), and initial New York state teacher certification in five years of full-time study (10 semesters plus two summers in the final year). Graduates of these programs will be awarded their professional New York state teacher certification after two years of full-time teaching.

These programs offer several advantages: (1) They offer students the richest possible undergraduate English major curriculum; (2) they more easily accommodate students who wish to earn an Integral Honors or a departmental honors degree, earn a minor, or take advantage of study abroad opportunities; (3) they are less expensive and more efficient than completing separate bachelor and master degree programs, in part because students complete three graduate-level education courses in their eighth semester of undergraduate study at the undergraduate tuition rate.

Admission and Additional Program Requirements

Students who plan to pursue this five-year program of study will ordinarily be required to complete EDU 105 within their first three semesters at Le Moyne College; EDU 215 within their first four semesters; and the following English courses within their first five semesters: ENG 218, ENG 301, ENG 318, and two of the four required survey courses (ENG 305, ENG 306, ENG 350, ENG 351).

In their sixth semester, students who meet the above admissions requirements and have earned a 3.0 cumulative G.P.A. in the English major or better may apply for admission to the Five-Year B.A./M.S.T. Program by submitting a letter of application to the English Department chair.

After the seventh semester, all but six undergraduate-level credits must be completed of the undergraduate English major and Core requirements. In the eighth semester, the remaining six undergraduate-level course credits as well as the following three graduate-level courses for undergraduate free-elective credit must be taken: EDG 515, EDG 530, EDG 545.

In the first summer of study, between semesters eight & nine, students must take EDG 550 and EDG 560. In the fall term (semester nine), students must take EDG 570, EDG 580, and one graduate English elective.

Spring term (semester 11) is reserved for Preservice Teaching (EDG 654 and EDG 656). In the summer afterward (semester 10), three graduate English electives are required.

Students enrolled in this special five-year program will receive both the B.A. and M.S.T. upon completion of all course requirements, in accordance with regulations of the New York state education department. However, students in the program are invited to participate in graduation ceremonies with their undergraduate Le Moyne classmates after spring term of their fourth year in the program, and again with their graduate classmates after spring term of their fifth year. Also, any student who decides to leave the program upon or after completing the fourth year may request a Bachelor of Arts in English and be awarded that degree, as the student will have fulfilled all requirements for the undergraduate English major after eight semesters in the B.A./M.S.T. program.

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

B.A. in English and M.S.T. in Adolescent Education, Grades 7-12

(155 credit hours)

Core RequirementsHours
Includes EDU 105 (see below under Education) 52
Major RequirementsHours
Advanced Writing Course (see under Requirements for B.A. in English and Initial Teacher Certification Tracks)3
ENG 301 Advanced Grammar and Usage 3
ENG 305 Eng Lit Survey I:thru Milton 3
ENG 306 Eng Lit Survey II:Rest-Present 3
ENG 318 Shakespeare 3
ENG 350 Amer Lit Survey I:to Civil War 3
ENG 351 Am Lit SurveyII:CivWar-Present 3
English Electives (One period course that focuses on a period before 1789. Students must additionally take two topic courses, one of which must be a world/multicultural literature course (ENG 323, 327, 340, 382, or 383). Students must also take two genre courses.)15
Media Literacy elective (see under Requirements for B.A. in English and Initial Teacher Certification Tracks)3
Major SupportHours
Foreign Language (The nine hours must be in one language. If, however, after a minimum of six hours of language at the college level a student has completed or advanced beyond the mid-intermediate level [103], he or she may substitute an English elective for the remaining three hours.)9
College-level Mathematics Course 3
Undergraduate Free Electives 9
Education RequirementsHours
EDU 105 Teaching in a Diverse Society (counts toward Core requirements [see above]; not included in credit-count here)3
EDU 215 Learning in a Sociocultural Context 3
EDG 515 Introduction to Special Edu Perspective 3
EDG 520 Child Abuse Workshop/SAVE Violence Prev 0
EDG 530 Multicultur Literacy Methods - Secondary 3
EDG 545 Plan,Assessing,Managing Inclus Classrm 3
EDG 550 Teach/Adapt Curric Content Specialists 3
EDG 560 Literacy Development Across Curriculum 3
EDG 570 Adolescent Strategies and Technology 4
EDG 580 Pedagogical Content Knowledge 3
EDG 654 Superv Preservice Teaching Grades 7-9 4.5
EDG 656 Superv Preservice Teaching Grades 10-12 4.5
Graduate English Education Electives (four courses)12

B.A. in English and M.S.T. in Dual Adolescent and Special Education, Grades 7-12

The admission, course, and other requirements for this program are identical to those for the Five-Year English and Adolescent Education program with the following exceptions:

  1. In the first summer of study, students take EDG 525 in addition to EDG 550 and EDG 560.
  2. In spring semester of the fifth year, students complete their preservice teaching requirement by taking EDG 520, EDG 657, and either EDG 654 or EDG 656.
  3. In the second summer of study, students take two English education electives (six credits) rather than three (nine credits).

Graduates of this program have the added advantage of being triply marketable:

  1. for regular secondary English positions;
  2. for secondary special education positions;
  3. for joint English/special education positions.

Typical Program for B.A. in English and M.S.T. in Adolescent Education, Grades 7-12

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
WRT 1013 ENG 2103
HST 1103 HST 1113
EAC3 EAC3
EDU 1053 PHL 1103
Natural Science3 EDU 1503
Sophomore Year
ENG 2183 ENG 3013
ENG 3053 ENG 3063
EAC3 PHL 2103
EDU 2153 ENG P/T/G Elective**3
Theology3 ENG 3183
Junior Year
ENG 3103 ENG P/T/G Elective**3
ENG 3503 ENG 3513
ENG P/T/G Elective**3 Religion3
MTH Elective3 Free Elective3
Free Elective3 Free Elective3
Senior Year
ENG P/T/G Elective**3 COR 400A3
ENG P/T/G Elective**3 ENG P/T/G Elective**3
Advanced Writing Course3 EDG 5153
Media Literacy elective3 EDG 5303
EDG 5453
Summer I
EDG 5503
EDG 5603
Fifth Year
EDG 5704 EDG 5200
EDG 5803 EDG 6544.5
English EDU Elective3 EDG 6564.5
Summer II
English EDU Elective3
English EDU Elective3
English EDU Elective3

** ENG elective: Period/Topic/Genre

Literature Minor

Students who want to minor in literature should consult with the chair of the English Department. The usual requirements for a literature minor are 9 hours of core English courses plus nine hours of literature courses taken at the upper-division level. However, requirements for the minor will be determined on an individual basis.

Irish Literature Minor

This minor offers students the opportunity to concentrate on the literature of Ireland while gaining an understanding of its historical, cultural, and literary contexts. Students completing the Irish literature minor must take:

  1. three literature courses specifically related to Ireland (four recommended)
  2. one course in literature not related to Ireland
  3. one approved course from either History or Peace and Global Studies

The non-Irish literature course will ground students’ understanding of the wider British canon, while the History or Peace and Global Studies course provides knowledge of the wider European and global contexts that Irish writers navigate. Study abroad and summer language programs are options for the fulfillment of this minor. Students interested in these options should speak to the director of the minor.

Creative Writing Minor

Non-English majors who want to minor in creative writing should consult with the director of the creative writing program. The usual requirements for a minor are 15 hours in creative writing. Qualifications for the minor are determined on an individual basis. (Students who are English majors must follow the literature or the creative writing curriculum as part of their degree program.)

Film Minor

Housed within the English Department, the film minor is an interdisciplinary program that not only leads students to explore the many relations among visual media and humanities disciplines but also encourages students to hone and apply their critical thinking and writing skills.

Film minors will be invited to participate in the annual Syracuse International Film and Video Festival, an exciting community event held in the fall at venues throughout Syracuse, including Le Moyne. Opportunities are available to intern at the festival and to work on and attend pre-festival events throughout the year.

Questions should be directed to the Director of the Film Program.

Film Minor

Minor RequirementsHours
ENG 372 History of Film: Beginnings to 1940 3
One of the following: 3
ENG 226 Introduction to Film Studies3
ENG 371 Critical Approaches to Film3
ENG 373 History of Film: 1940 to Present3
ENG 378 The Films of Alfred Hitchcock3
One film course outside the English and Communication and Film Studies Departments. At present these include: 3
REL 350 World Religions and Film3
REL 407 Postcolonial Theol & Cinemas of 3rd Wrld3
PHL 413 Movies, Remarriage and Unknownness4
PSC 354 Politics in Film3
FRN 206 French Through Film3
Choose from the following: 3
ENG 320 Documentary Film3
ENG 358 Representations of the Media in Film3
ENG 408 The Holocaust in Literature and Film3
ENG 414 Amer Film Noir & Femme Fatale3
ENG 415 12 American Films:Auteurism3
ENG 416 Literature, Film and Culture3
Choose from any of the courses listed above, in addition to: 3
THR 205 Acting I3
CRW 387 Scriptwriting3
CMM 205 Introduction to Video Production3

Medieval Studies Minor

For the description of a minor in medieval studies, go to the Interdisciplinary Programs section of this catalog.

Advanced Writing Minor

The Advanced Writing minor is open to both English and non-English majors who wish to sharpen their critical writing skills and to expand their appreciation for the history, the grammar, and the rhetorical applications of the English language. The Advanced Writing minor is particularly aimed at students intent on developing writing skills that they can then apply to the demands of the professional world or to further graduate study. Students interested in the Advanced Writing minor will concentrate on developing skills that are necessary to producing elegant, persuasive, critical, and expository writing. This minor is particularly appropriate not only for students who intend to teach the practice of writing, but also for those who will be entering fields where expertise in writing is valued and demanded.

The Advanced Writing minor consists of five courses:

Advanced Writing Minor

Minor RequirementsHours
ENG 218 Critical Perspectives on Literature 3
English Elective 3
Choose one of the following ENG courses: 3
ENG 301 Advanced Grammar and Usage3
ENG 314 Advanced Grammar II3
ENG 393 Teaching and Tutoring Writing3
Two courses from the following list, only one of which may be a creative writing course: 6
ENG 338 Writing in the Real World3
ENG 395 Nonfiction Writing Workshop3
ENG 397 Writing Nonfiction:3
ENG 403 Writing and Speaking in the Professions3
CRW 385 Creative Writing Workshop3
CRW 386 Introduction to Playwriting3
CRW 387 Scriptwriting3
CRW 389 Writing the One-Act Play3
CRW 391 Advanced Poetry Workshop3
CRW 392 Advanced Fiction Workshop3
CRW 395 Nonfiction Writing Workshop3
CMM 105 Media Writing3
CMM 224 Environmental Journalism3
CMM 274 Reporting and Writing3
CMM 311 Writing for Electronic Media3
CMM 314 Journalism and American Literature3
CMM 373 Practicum in Journalism1
CMM 374 Literary Journalism3
CMM 379 Music Journalism3
CMM 474 Reporting Syracuse3

Courses


CRW 220-239 . Special Topics (3).

A course sequence that offers thematically focused elective courses of current interest to instructors and students. Selections may include such topics as writing historical fiction, magical realism, children’s stories, narrative poetry, the poem sequence and poetry in traditional forms. Any CRW special topics course may be used to fulfill part or all of the creative writing curriculum requirement for nine hours of writing workshops.

CRW 384 (ENG 384). Introduction to Writing Poetry (3).

This introductory creative writing workshop is devoted to the writing and revising of poems. We will explore writing techniques as well as writing samples by established authors, but most of our time will be devoted to critiquing student poems with an eye toward revision and improvement. Students will complete a final portfolio of poetry to be submitted at the end of term.

CRW 385 (ENG 385). Creative Writing Workshop (3).

Intensive practice in the writing and criticism of poetry and fiction. Associated readings geared to the needs of the individual participant. Course can be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: WRT 101. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

CRW 386 (THR 386/ENG 386). Introduction to Playwriting (3).

A workshop that introduces students to the techniques of dramatic writing. In our explorations of structure, dialogue and methods of characterization, students begin by writing one- to two- page exercises, advance to outlines for plot and character and finally write a ten-minute play which is performed in class. Prerequisite: WRT 101. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

CRW 387 (ENG 387/CMM 387). Scriptwriting (3).

This course provides study and practice in the special requirements of writing fictional works for television and film. This course will focus on: basic dramatic structures and story telling, the premise, the pitch, character development, writing the treatment, story outlines, writing the master scene and completing the script. At semester end, students are expected to produce full-length tele-plays, radio dramas or film scripts. Prerequisite: WRT 101. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

CRW 389 (ENG 389/THR 389). Writing the One-Act Play (3).

The goal of this writing workshop is to write a one-act play. The course is designed for students who have some experience with writing plays or a strong creative writing background. Students will first explore the techniques of dramatic writing through examples, exercises, and class discussion, advance to plot outlines and character sketches, and finally write a one-act play, which will be performed in class. Prerequisite: WRT101. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

CRW 390 . Independent Study (1-3).

A student who wishes to pursue an independent project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration, a proposed plan that includes a description of the project and its goals, the methods to be followed, a schedule of work and supervision, an evaluation procedure and the number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair and the dean of arts and sciences. It will be kept on file in the dean of arts and sciences' office. An independent study concentrating on writing may be used to fulfill part or all of the creative writing curriculum requirement for 9 hours of writing workshops. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

CRW 391 (ENG 391). Advanced Poetry Workshop (3).

A poetry writing workshop for students who have completed the introductory creative writing workshop or who can demonstrate advanced creative writing abilities. The course requires a close study of poems by major modern and contemporary authors and may include exercises in traditional forms. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and CRW/ENG 385. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

CRW 392 (ENG 392). Advanced Fiction Workshop (3).

A fiction writing workshop for students who have completed the introductory creative writing workshop or who can demonstrate advanced fiction writing ability. The course requires the reading of major modern and contemporary authors, weekly short writing assignments and the writing of an extended work of prose fiction or a linked series of short stories. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and CRW/ENG 385. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

CRW 395 (ENG 395). Nonfiction Writing Workshop (3).

A workshop that will introduce students, through reading of contemporary writers and weekly short writing assignments, to the many varieties of creative nonfiction, including the personal essay, memoir, travel writing, the lyric essay, the portrait, and the political essay. We'll engage the eternal concerns and debates of nonfiction writing, including: what it means to tell the "truth," representing the "I" or first-person narrator as a character, telling other people's secrets, the (un)reliability of memory, etc. We'll learn how to use traditional fiction techniques (scene, character, setting, dialogue) in nonfiction, as well as practice techniques more typically seen in creative nonfiction, such as enacting on the page the writer's "story of thought." On occasion this writing workshop will be offered with a particular focus, such as writing about science, family, or sports. The focus will be announced in advance of registration. Prerequisite: WRT 101.

CRW 480 . Honors Tutorial in Creative Writing (3).

CRW 480 Honors Tutorial in Creative Writing is the course students must register for to complete an Honors Degree in Creative Writing. The course is designed for the student who excels in one or more creative writing genres, and who deserves further challenge and recognition. By the end of their junior year at the latest, qualified CRW program concentrators and minors will be invited to pursue a CRW honors degree. Applicants will be required to have a 3.0 overall GPA and a 3.5 GPA within Creative Writing Program courses. Those accepted will work towards completion of a high quality manuscript of poetry(at least 30 pages), fiction, creative nonfiction, or a play (at least 50 pages), along with an Introduction of between 5-10 pages. Multiple genre manuscripts are acceptable, with the length to be determined by the instructor. Students may complete this honors manuscript either while taking their 4th CRW advanced or genre specific workshop during their senior year (in which case they would participate in regular workshop activities but meet additionally with the instructor regarding the honors project) or while working individually with an instructor. Students must undertake a "defense" of their creative project before a designated CRW honors program committee (the defense may include a public reading or, in the case of a play, a public performance). The student may gain permission to register for another three credits of ENG 480 if doing so is useful and necessary. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

ENG 105 (THR 105). Introduction to Theatre (3).

A survey of theatre art, past and present, with a behind-the-scenes examination of the concepts and personnel involved in its creation. Class projects are intended to give students introductory experience with playwriting, acting, directing, design and theatre criticism. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

ENG 200 . Perspectives in Literature (3).

This course is intended to encourage the enjoyment and understanding of a variety of literary genres and individual works drawn from a range of world cultures. Students will read some selections from ancient, European and American literatures, among others, including works by women and minority writers, and they will write critical responses to the course texts during the semester. Prerequisite: WRT 101.

ENG 201 (CMM 201). Fundamentals of Speech (3).

Essentials of voice production, oral interpretation, speech organization and use of supporting materials; preparation and delivery of speech materials; group and panel discussion.

ENG 203 (CLS 203). Classical Mythology (3).

No knowledge of Latin or Greek is required. The common repertory of myths from Greek and Roman sources is studied. Attention is also given to the influence of these myths in both ancient and later times, especially on literature and art. Prerequisites: WRT 101, and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Period (Pre 1789) requirement.

ENG 204 (CLS 204). Classical Lit in Translation (3).

Selected readings and discussions of important works from ancient literatures. Prerequisite: WRT 101, and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Period (Pre 1789) requirement.

ENG 210 (ENG 300). Major Authors (3).

These courses provide students with an intensive study of the work of a major author such as Borges, Dante, Dickens, Homer, Morrison, Ovid, Rushdie, Shakespeare, Twain or Woolf, as well as the cultural and historical context from which the work emerges. Students will be expected to develop a critical vocabulary for analyzing these texts and to demonstrate their understanding of the material through class discussions, presentations and critical writing. Writing instructional. Prerequisite: WRT 101.

ENG 218 . Critical Perspectives on Literature (3).

A critical introduction to the study and enjoyment of literature. Students will read, discuss and write about a variety of genres including works of fiction, poetry and drama from a range of cultures and historical eras, many of them by women and minority authors. In addition to instruction in the critical terms and conventions of literary study at the college level, the course emphasizes intensive critical writing based on the close readings of texts and an understanding of the variety of interpretive questions and critical perspectives that these texts invite. Prerequisite: WRT 101.

ENG 220-239 . Special Topics (3).

A course sequence that offers thematically focused elective courses of cur- rent interest to instructor and students. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218.

ENG 236 . Literary Paris (3).

Students will read a range of texts (both fiction and non-fiction) set in Paris, focusing on the experience of Americans in Paris. Texts include memoirs by Ernest Hemingway, Adam Gopnick, and a range of African-American writers, and fiction by Edith Wharton, Tracy Chevalier, and others. The course will also include an introduction to the culture, history, art, and landmarks of the city. The course concludes with an eleven-to-twelve day visit to Paris. Additional fees will be required. Prerequisite: WRT 101.

ENG 300 (ENG 210). Major Authors: (3).

These courses provide students with an intensive study of the work of a major author, as well as the cultural and historical context from which the work emerges. Students will be expected to develop a critical vocabulary for analyzing these texts and to demonstrate their mastery of the material through class discussions, presentations, and critical writing. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200 or 218.

ENG 301 . Advanced Grammar and Usage (3).

A study of the nature and structure of language through a review of the traditional, structural, and transformational grammars and their specific applications to modern English, to language skills, and to teaching. Prerequisite: WRT 101. Fulfills: Topic requirement.

ENG 302 (THR 302). The Western Drama Tradition (3).

A study of major periods of theatrical development from the Greeks and Romans through the eighteenth century, with emphasis on dramatic literature in relation to performance conditions and cultural backgrounds. Prerequisite: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210, or ENG 218. Fulfills: Genre requirement.

ENG 304 . The History of Criticism (3).

An introduction to modern literary theory and the major movements in literary criticism. Readings include selections from Aristotle, Horace, Sidney, Coleridge, Arnold, Eliot, DeMan, Barthes, Fish and Eagleton. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218. Fulfills: Topic requirement.

ENG 305 . Eng Lit Survey I:thru Milton (3).

A survey of English literature of the Old English period, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance, including the major work of Milton. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218. Required for English majors.

ENG 306 . Eng Lit Survey II:Rest-Present (3).

A survey of English literature from the Restoration, through the 18th and 19th centuries, to the present. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218. Required for English majors.

ENG 307 . The Epic (3).

A study of selected epics and works in the epic tradition, e.g., "Iliad," "Odyssey," "Aeneid," "Divine Comedy," mock epics, with attention not only to literary forms but also to theories of epic and to cultural contexts. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218. Fulfills: Genre requirement.

ENG 309 (CMM 309). American Culture & Art of Johnny Cash (3).

Students will be asked to engage in an interdisciplinary investigation of the varied contexts--media, religious, political, historical, economic and geographic--that helped define the creative world of Johnny Cash, a major songwriter and musician. Fulfills Core: Visual and Performing Arts (VPA) requirement. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Topic requirement.

ENG 310 (ENG 310H/ENG 310I/ENG 310G/ENG 310K/ENG 310J/ENG 310L/ENG 310M/ENG 310N/ENG 310O/ENG 310Q/ENG 310R/ENG 310S). Literature and Culture (3).

This interdisciplinary course explores a period or movement in intellectual and/or cultural history. It may also focus upon transformative texts, events, or characters as they engage these movements and moments. This course will invite students to engage in a dialogue between disciplines and ideas using literary texts both as the primary source for inquiry and the medium through which ideas are imagined, articulated, and contested. Students will explore the ideas, events, and literary genres that frame the particular intellectual issue or historical moment, while also engaging the varied contexts that inform a work of literature. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 210.

ENG 310G (ENG 310/ENG 310H/ENG 310I/ENG 310K/ENG 310J/ENG 310L/ENG 310M/ENG 310N/ENG 310O/ENG 310Q/ENG 310R/ENG 310S). Lit and Culture: Romantic Revolutions (3).

The course investigates the history of major revolutionary 'moments' during the Romantic period (1770-1830) in England. It aims to study the powerful and intense experience that results from living through the extraordinary historical time that is characteristic of revolutionary moments. How do such moments encourage historical actors in daring to think in otherwise unimaginable directions (including very violent ones)? What is it about this experience that explains the leap into modernity? How did sharing this experience affect the private (romantic) lives of revolutionary actors? And finally, how were these experiences manifested and celebrated in art and literature? We will be discussing the two major political revolutions of the time, the French and the American Revolutions, the Industrial Revolution and its consequences-- the decline of Agrarian Lifestyle and the rise of Urban life--, the revolutionary debates on the rights of man and woman, the revolution in manners initiated by Mary Wollstonecraft, the revolutionary views on society and social relations, the rise of nationalism and national identity , and the aesthetic revolution initiated by Wordsworth's and Coleridge's revolutionary volume of poetry, Lyrical Ballads, among other issues. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200 or ENG 210.

ENG 310H (ENG 310/ENG 310I/ENG 310G/ENG 310K/ENG 310J/ENG 310L/ENG 310M/ENG 310N/ENG 310O/ENG 310Q/ENG 310R/ENG 310S). Lit and Culture: Ancient Transgressions (3).

This interdisciplinary course will focus on transgressions of social, religious, and cultural boundaries of the ancient Mediterranean world. Studying literary, historical, and artistic sources, we will investigate depictions of aberrant behavior, staying attuned to the forces that compel humans to violate established norms of conduct, and evaluating the societal upheavals caused by these violations. What compels a person to be lead astray from proper conduct or previously held principles? How do individuals, families, and communities respond to, and attempt to recover from, ruptures of expected behavior? We will consider the personal, political, historical, and cultural implications of these questions by examining Classical ancient texts and their continuing influence on the contemporary world, culminating in a multi-media investigation of the enigmatic figure of Cleopatra, the historical ruler of Egypt who was castigated by ancient Romans, (in)famously portrayed in Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra, and immortalized centuries later in Mankiewicz's 1963 blockbuster film. Looking at a variety of sources from a range of time periods, we will use the thematic of transgression to examine the continual interplay between history and artistic re-presentation of history, and to explore the living legacy of the ancient Mediterranean. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200 or ENG 210.

ENG 310I (ENG 310/ENG 310H/ENG 310G/ENG 310K/ENG 310J/ENG 310L/ENG 310M/ENG 310N/ENG 310O/ENG 310Q/ENG 310R/ENG 310S). Lit and Culture: Utopian and Dystopian Visions (3).

This offering of ENG 310 gives students the opportunity to discover how utopian and dystopian writings that look optimistically or pessimistically to the future do so by looking back to critique their precursors. Thus, in effect, utopian and dystopian tales have been engaging in something like a 2500-year-old debate between the present and the past over what should be our vision of a future ideal society, over what nightmarish forms of society we most want to guard ourselves against, and equally, over what dangers might attend our indulging in such imaginings, or of neglecting to do so. In class discussions, brief writing assignments, quizzes, and two formal essays, students will be invited to contribute to that same debate, firstly through study of selectedtexts that are at once literary, philosophical, and politically polemical, secondly by articulating responses to these texts that draw upon their own interests, experiences, and concerns'including the knowledge and different disciplinary perspectives that they have gained in their other Core courses and their major and minor programs. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200 or ENG 210.

ENG 310J (ENG 310/ENG 310H/ENG 310I/ENG 310G/ENG 310K/ENG 310L/ENG 310M/ENG 310N/ENG 310O/ENG 310Q/ENG 310R/ENG 310S). Lit and Culture: Representing History: Encountering the Holocaust Through Literature, Film and Art (3).

Obviously enough, we have an ethical obligation to hold onto the Holocaust as historical event'collectively to remember it and somehow comprehend it. We have an ethical obligation to understand what the Holocaust meant for those who lived through it. We owe it, that is, to those who suffered or died, who suffered and died, to try at least to see what they went through. But as many Holocaust scholars have suggested, the limit nature of the event, its extremity and singularity, may effectively put it out of reach. If, that is, as some have suggested, the Holocaust is unrepresentable, how do those on the outside, those who did not live through the experience, gain access to it? In this course we will approach an engagement with Holocaust history through the problem of representation, looking at a variety of takes at mediation: survivor accounts, like Elie Wiesel's Night, narrative fictions, like Martin Amis's Time's Arrow, fiction films like Louis Malle's Au revoir les enfants, documentary films, like Alain Resnais's Night and Fog, hybrid texts like Art Spiegelman's graphic novel MAUS, and Holocaust art, produced by children and adults, both during and after the Holocaust. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200 or ENG 210.

ENG 310K (ENG 310/ENG 310H/ENG 310I/ENG 310G/ENG 310J/ENG 310L/ENG 310M/ENG 310N/ENG 310O/ENG 310Q/ENG 310R/ENG 310S). Lit and Culture: Literature and Medicine (3).

This is an interdisciplinary course exploring the intersection of medicine and literature, seeking to understand our perceptions of disease as a cultural phenomenon. The course is designed to explore the cultural dynamic of our experience of disease, and the mechanisms, both metaphorical and imaginative with which human beings ascribe significance to affliction. These meanings have been set out most fully in David Morris's The Culture of Pain, a prize-winning essay that will serve as the central text in the course. We will begin, however, with a brisk history of medicine outlined in Roy Porter's Blood and Guts. Other readings include short stories that focus on the experience of illness as it has been articulated by modern writers. Although this course will have a particular relevance for students interested in a variety of health-care fields, all students are welcome. The course will focus not on the practice of medicine as a form of science, but on medicine as one of the human arts. We will pay particular attention to the experience of illness from the standpoint of those who have actually been ill. The course argues, what has been a received opinion in other circles for some time, that our experience of illness, like our experience of weight, beauty, or age, is in some measure social constructed. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200 or ENG 210.

ENG 310L (ENG 310/ENG 310H/ENG 310I/ENG 310G/ENG 310K/ENG 310J/ENG 310M/ENG 310N/ENG 310O/ENG 310Q/ENG 310R/ENG 310S). Literature and Culture: Children of War (3).

From Joseph Weissman in 1942 Paris to Rawi Hage in 1982 Beirut, from Michael Berg in 1958 Berlin to Marie N'Daiye in 1994 Kigali, and from Adis and Karim of 1996 Sarajevo to the child soldiers of Africa today, the children of war will share their stories, often in their own words. Through historical, cultural and hermeneutical analyses of four novels, fourteen films,and supplemental literature, this course will explore the heights and depths of the human spirit in contemporary societies broken by war. Specific themes to be discussed will include childhood innocence in the face of irrational violence, superstition and the developing imagination, moral ambiguity and emerging sexuality, and building adult futures of responsibility and hope. Weekly screening labs will include films from Bosnia, Poland, Lebanon, Israel, Iraq, Congo, Rwanda, France, Germany, Canada, and China, accompanying discussions of Kosinski's The Painted Bird, Chang's Lust, Caution, Schlink's The Reader, Hage's DeNiro's Game, and Galloway's The Cellist of Sarajevo as well as contemporary news journalism. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200 or ENG 210.

ENG 310M (ENG 310/ENG 310H/ENG 310I/ENG 310G/ENG 310K/ENG 310J/ENG 310L/ENG 310N/ENG 310O/ENG 310Q/ENG 310R/ENG 310S). Literature and Culture: Literature and Psychology (3).

Freud famously said, 'Everywhere I go I find a poet has been there before me.' Freud recognizes that literature dramatized human psychology long before psychologists studied it as a science; he also suggests that, because literature and psychology traverse similar ground, they can be mutually helpful in understanding human nature and culture. We will begin our course by studying the foundations of psychoanalysis (Freud, Jung, and Adler), examining how these theories have influenced both writers and literary scholars. Later in the semester, we will explore how feminism, theories of race, and other culturally-minded theories have challenged these foundations and, consequently, also affected literary studies. Specifically, we will consider how evolving understandings of human psychology, especially those that recognize cultural differences, parallel a shift in how we create and interpret literature. Through close-analyses of Willa Cather's A Lost Lady, Tennessee Williams's A Streetcar Named Desire, Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, a selection of classic fairytales, and short stories by Edgar Allan Poe and others, we will examine how different psychological theories of human behavior relate to character development, plot movement, and reader response. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200 or ENG 210.

ENG 310N (ENG 310/ENG 310H/ENG 310I/ENG 310G/ENG 310K/ENG 310J/ENG 310L/ENG 310M/ENG 310O/ENG 310Q/ENG 310R/ENG 310S). Literature and Culture: the Haitian Revolution (3).

This interdisciplinary seminar explores the Haitian Revolution and its varied representations in films, historical texts, and literature. The Haitian Revolution was the only successful slave uprising to result in the establishment of a free black republic in the Western hemisphere. Of course, at the time, this revolution went generally unremarked and unpublicized; for many years,the white political powers of North America and Western Europe wanted to hide or ignore the story of black slaves who rose up, took control of the island on which they lived, and instituted an independent government. The gap in popular historical knowledge about this revolution also results from the fact that many ex-slaves/soldiers couldn't read or write to tell the world their stories. This class aims to fill that gap by examining historical and literary accounts of the events surrounding the revolution and its aftermath. We will read works by C.L.R. James, Alejo Carpentier, Derek Walcott, Edwidge Danticat, William Wordsworth, Michel Rolph-Trouillot, and others. We will explore issues of race, class, representation, hegemony and politics in Haiti's colonial and post-colonial contexts, and we will consider how the revolution and its effects still permeate Haitian culture and society today. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200 or ENG 210.

ENG 310O (ENG 310/ENG 310H/ENG 310I/ENG 310G/ENG 310K/ENG 310J/ENG 310L/ENG 310M/ENG 310N/ENG 310Q/ENG 310R/ENG 310S). Literature and Culture: Hamlet (3).

Through its 400+ years in existence, Hamlet has been one of the most widely read, frequently performed, and scrupulously analyzed of all literary texts. This course begins with an attempt to put the play into its original cultural context by considering some key issues raised by the play, the political and religious backgrounds of these issues, and the conceptions of human psychology and physiology that inform Shakespeare's treatment of them. There follows an intensive sixweek study of the text itself, with our discussions enriched by considering the perspective of various disciplines on particular pieces of the play'e.g., the Catholic-Protestant divergence of opinion about the Ghost, the psychological analysis by Freud's disciple Ernest Jones of Hamlet's relationship with his mother, and the modern feminist perspective on Ophelia. In considering the direct and indirect sources of Hamlet, we will locate Shakespeare's work in the Renaissance revenge tragedy tradition by reading Thomas Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy, and we will then move on to examining the uses (and abuses) of Hamlet made by the creative arts of subsequent centuries: painting, music (opera, folk, and rock) and film. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200 or ENG 210.

ENG 310Q (ENG 310/ENG 310H/ENG 310I/ENG 310G/ENG 310K/ENG 310J/ENG 310L/ENG 310M/ENG 310N/ENG 310O/ENG 310R/ENG 310S). Literature and Culture: Modernism (3).

The 19th century, often described as a period of rapid industrial change and urbanization, and famously characterized as a 'century of becoming,' so altered the experience of being in the western world that it eventually led to the major shift in western intellectual and cultural history known as Modernism, that extraordinary period from the late-19th century to the beginning of World War II that produced radical new conceptions of human subjectivity and radical new ways of representing humans and their experience of the world, as well as new ways of making meaning in such a world. This course will consider the cultural forces and the set of ideas that led to Modernism and will examine the major features of Modernist production itself. With a focus on the literature and the art of the period'and with steadfast attention to wider intellectual and cultural contexts'this course will address the modernist themes of subjectivism, perception, impressionism, self-consciousness, stream-of-consciousness, the unconscious, representation, experimentation, alterity, myth, alienation, colonization, globalization, mass culture, materiality, social life, gender and sexuality, movement, being in time, as well as the new role of art itself in the constitution of meaning. The course will examine the works of Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Lacan, Conrad, Kakfa, Joyce, Woolf, Yeats, Ford, Eliot, Hemingway, Stein, Picasso, Braque, Duchamp, Saussure, Bergson, and/or others. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200 or ENG 210.

ENG 310R (ENG 310/ENG 310H/ENG 310I/ENG 310G/ENG 310K/ENG 310J/ENG 310L/ENG 310M/ENG 310N/ENG 310O/ENG 310Q/ENG 310S). Literature & Culture: Toni Morrison and American Culture (3).

As a Nobel-laureate novelist, a professor of English and creative writing, an editor at Random House, a literary critic, a social critic, and a 'public intellectual,' Toni Morrison has had, and continues to have, an extraordinary influence on U.S. culture. While much of her fiction focuses on African American women, her male characters are as insightfully drawn and almost as prominent in her works as her female characters. In this course, we will explore Morrison's influence on American culture through multiple lenses. We will read and discuss three novels: A Mercy, Morrison's exploration of the genesis of racism in U.S. slavery; Song of Solomon, a self-centered young man's search for his black masculine identity, aided by an unorthodox female ancestor-figure; and God Help the Child [due to be published in April], an examination of the traumatic effects of internalized racism on contemporary African American women. A video of Morrison and Danielpour's opera Margaret Garner, a reworking of Beloved, will be part of our coursework. Selections from Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination will show Morrison's huge iconoclastic influence on 'white' literary criticism. We'll also study Morrison's Nobel Prize acceptance speech, with its gorgeous prose and provocative discussion of racial narratives. Finally, we'll read one or two of Morrison's didactic children's books, particularly Please, Louise!, set in'where else?'a library. Throughout the semester we will study African American history, in part through The Black Book, which Morrison edited, and its Foreword, which Morrison wrote, and we will read and discuss articles from the disciplines of gender and women's studies, cultural studies, and psychology. Students will have the opportunity to use all these disciplines and texts in the critical writing they do for the course.

ENG 310S (ENG 310/ENG 310H/ENG 310I/ENG 310G/ENG 310K/ENG 310J/ENG 310L/ENG 310M/ENG 310N/ENG 310O/ENG 310Q/ENG 310R). Literature and Culture: Crimes and Misdemeanors (3).

This interdisciplinary course examines the idea of criminality in American literature and film. Using a number of text that explore the ambiguities of criminality and legality, we will encounter characters who take pleasure in other's pain, some who are heroic in their law breaking, and others whose lawlessness disrupts the judgments of a serious world. In particular, we will explore the ways in which race, gender, class and ethnicity shade and shadow our understanding of what's right, what's just, and/or what's legal. The course will address the centrality of radical individualism as represented on a spectrum of bad behavior: from serial murders to playful mayhem. We will draw on a range of genres as well, from the gangster picture and the western, to short fiction and comic sketches. Our texts will include the foundational philosophy of Henry David Thoreau and Elizabeth Cady Stanton's Declaration of Sentiments, the psychological horror and crime fiction of Henry James, Washington Irving, Edgar Allan Poe, Susan Glaspell, and Herman Melville; and the films of Alfred Hitchcock, Billy Wilder, and Roman Polanski. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200 or ENG 210.

ENG 311 . English Literature: An Overview (3).

This course provides an overview of the history of English literature. The course will address most literary periods, covering a variety of genres (drama, poetry, fiction and non-fiction prose). The main text for the course will be The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Major Authors. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218. Required for Theatre Arts majors.

ENG 312 . Chaucer (3).

The study of the major works of Chaucer. No prior knowledge of Middle English needed. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218. Fulfills: Period (Pre 1789) requirement.

ENG 313 . Medieval Quests and Romances (3).

A selection of outstanding literature of medieval times, including works by Dante, Marie de France and Chaucer along with many writers who remain unknown; emphasis on the way that medieval themes and materials crossed geographical and linguistic borders. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Genre requirement.

ENG 314 . Advanced Grammar II (3).

This course is a continuation of Advanced Grammar to be offered as an elective during the summer sessions. Picking up where Advanced Grammar concludes, Advanced Grammar Part Two will assess syntactic structures beyond the level of the single clause, continue reviewing the parts of speech, and focus more intensively on the uses of punctuation. We will diagram increasingly complex sentences and use this skill to identify and correct errors in sentences from student writing and published work. Fulfills: Topic requirement.

ENG 316 . Medieval Literature (3).

A study of selected major prose, poetry and/or drama of the English medieval period, with attention to classical, continental and religious influences, as well as relevant historical contexts. This course will variously focus on Old English literature, including Beowulf, Old English shorter poems and saint's lives, the works of Bede, Aelfric, Wulfstan and/or Asser, as well as Middle English literature, including the works of Chaucer, Gower, the Gawian-poet, Langland, Julian of Norwich, Margary Kempe, Layamon, anonymous romances, lyrics, sermons and plays. Any one of the following themes might be focused on, in any given semester: dreamers and dream visions, love and war, faith and pilgrimage, gender and chivalry monsters and heroes. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Period (Pre 1789) requirement.

ENG 317 . Renaissance Literature (3).

A study of selected major prose and poetry of the English Renaissance, with attention to continental influences and relevant contexts. This course will variously focus on the works of Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare (the sonnets), More, Erasmus, Marlowe, Jonson, Donne, Herbert and/or Marvell. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218. Fulfills: Period (Pre 1789) requirement.

ENG 318 . Shakespeare (3).

A study of selected works by Shakespeare toward developing a critical appreciation of his plays in particular. The course emphasizes close readings of Shakespeare's texts and analyses of the relationship between playscript and performance, in addition to providing instruction in conducting library research on literary topics. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218.

ENG 319 (THR 319). Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (3).

The course will focus on popular non-Shakespearean plays written and performed in England during the late 16th and early 17th centuries. Special attention will be given to comedic and tragic traditions and to issues of class, politics and gender. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200 ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Period (Pre 1789) requirement.

ENG 320 . Documentary Film (3).

Emphasis on the study of important documentary filmmakers, influential documentaries, and major schools of documentary film, as well as issues such as the role of the documentary filmmaker, the notion of objectivity in documentary, ethics in filmmaking, and the influence of the camera. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Genre requirement. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): VPA.

ENG 322 (CMM 314). Journalism and American Literature (3).

This course will survey the rich history of American journalists who have either produced creative works or who have relied upon literary techniques in their journalistic endeavors. Beginning with Thomas Paine and Benjamin Franklin, the course will move through the revolutionary period of essayists and pamphleteers, proceed to the nineteenth century and the romantic writings of political activists like Margaret Fuller and Henry David Thoreau, and the realist and naturalist fictions of writers like Mark Twain, Stephen Crane, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. The course will end by surveying the works of black and white writers of the early twentieth century--W.E.B. Dubois, Zora Neale Hurston, Ernest Hemmingway, and H.L. Menken--who negotiate their critiques of modern American culture and political life both as journalists and creative writers. Throughout the course, we will be exploring the relationship between the world of the American journalist and his or her subsequent influences upon American literature. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Topic requirement.

ENG 323 (PGS 323). Contemporary World Literature in English (3).

Students will read major literary works in English by writers from Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean. The principal texts have been published since the 1980s, and address issues such as colonialism and postcolonialism, national identity, globalization, migration, economic exploitation, and gender and sexuality. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Topic requirement.

ENG 324 . Milton and the Arts (3).

A study of John Milton's poetry and prose, with attention to its historical and biographical contexts. Though the main focis will be on his writings themselves, reading them in relation to his life and times will help us understand how and why, from his lyric poems to polemical prose to Paradise Lost, Milton regarded writing as both a political and spiritual "calling". Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218. Fulfills: Period (Pre 1789) requirement.

ENG 326 (GWS 326). 19th C English and Irish Women Writers (3).

This course will examine literature produced by English and Irish women, respectively, during the 19th C. In particular, we will attend to the ways in which issues of particular concern to women from these respective yet interconnected nations are engaged in similar but also divergent ways. The course will not seek to apply some universal standard applicable to women from both nations, nor is its intent to substantiate any false binaries. Rather, the interest is to consider how aesthetic and narrative differences reflect differing social contexts; how the close interactions between these nations inflect the respective literary canons; how women from these nations represent one another; and how gendered issues may or may not affect, and be affected by, wider national views. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Period (Post 1789) requirements.

ENG 327 (ENG 427). Harlem Renaissance (3).

This course will explore the fiction, music, art, and the political and philosophical writing that emerged during the period known as The Harlem Renaissance. We will begin by tracing the historical developments that made possible the formation of Harlem as both a place and an idea. Beginning with the writing of Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth, we will listen to nineteenth centruy Black voices as they set the stage for even more complex expressions of Black identity, citizenship, and culture. We will debate W.E.B. Dubois' claim that race is a product of "blood and culture" and we will explore the ways in which various Black artists interpret that complicated idea. We will also trace the ways in which Black culture- both the high art of salons and galleries and the popular culture of speakeasys and clubs-participated in trying to solve the 'problem' of being-as Louis Armstrong sang it- both "Black and Blue." Finally, we will listen carefully to the powerful voices of artists such as Zora Neale Hurston who celebrate their racial identity and who invite us- Black, White, Brown, and Yellow- to join in that celebration. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Topic requirements.

ENG 328 . The Invention of Print and Reinvention English Literature (3).

At the end of the Middle Ages in England, writers often lamented that their native tongue was "rustical," "rude," "barbarous" and "vile" compared to the Classical and Romance languages in which the world's literary masterpieces were written. Less than a hundred years later, Shakespeare and other English authors were being extolled by their countrymen as literary "kings" and "stars" equal to the best Greek, Latin, Italian, French, and Spanish authors. Instead of being an embarrassment, their poems, plays and prose works were held up as evidence of the nobility of the English language. What happened? ENG 328 invites students to discover potential answers to this question by taking a "book history approach" to the study of literature from this era, asking such questions as, In what forms were literary works made and circulated in late medieval and early modern times? How was it marketed? How regulated or censored? And how might such factors have influenced people's responses to literary works, which we know ranged from delight to rage, from fear to veneration? Thus the course offers an introduction to the techniques of hand-press book production and the rise and regulation of the London book trade; examination of the different physical features of early printed books, such as paper stocks and bindings, font types, ornamental title-page borders and woodcut illustrations; consideration of some recent influential essays on the relation between book history and literary history; and above all, scrutiny of a range of different literary works printed in a range of different forms- from bawdy penny ballads, railing rhymes and "bad quartos" to the sonnet sequences, "first folios," and other "printed monuments" that ultimately helped to invest English literature with new meaning and new value. Prerequisite: WRT 101 and ENG 218. Fulfills: Topic Requirement.

ENG 330 (THR 330). Literary London (3).

This course examines literature about London, one of the world's major cities, produced in England during the 18th and 19th centuries. We will study selected texts - poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and plays - that consider London's diversity and its significance as a cultural and commercial center, reflect on the social, political, philosophical, and religious ideas that have inspired representations of London, and recognize the contribution that London has made to English literature. The course is open to anyone with an interest and enthusiasm for the subject. It satisfies departmental requirements for major electives in the literature of the 18th and 19th centuries and, for theatre majors, one of the literature requirements. Students enrolled in this course will participate in a twelve-day study tour of London and its environs during January break. Additional fees will be required. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210, or ENG 218. Fulfills: Period (Post 1789) requirements.

ENG 333 . Restoration & 18th Century Lit (3).

Selected works of Restoration and eighteenth century literature, including works by Congreve, Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Gray, Collins, Burke and Burns. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218. Fulfills: Period (Pre 1789) requirement.

ENG 336 . The 18th Century Novel (3).

An examination of themes and styles in significant novels by major authors (e.g. Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne and Austen) with selected critical readings. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218. Fulfills: Genre requirement.

ENG 338 (CMM 338). Writing in the Real World (3).

This course calls on the practices of professional and business communication to offer students practice with writing in "real world" contexts. In this class, students will develop strategies for responding to professional and community-based writing scenarios, reaching internal and external audiences, designing both print and digital/online texts, and composing application materials. Students will engage writing and revision processes, provide feedback to peers, compose collaboratively as part of a team, and learn the standards and conventions of non-academic communication. The genres students encounter may include memo, letter, e-mail, resume, cover letter, flier, pamphlet, and website. The course will also address digital-visual communication tools including Twitter, PowerPoint, and other emerging platforms. Prerequisites: WRT 101, and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218.

ENG 340 (GWS 314/PGS 314). Post-Colonial Literature and Theory (3).

This course will introduce students to theories of colonialism through the study of world literatures. What is the impact of colonization on a culture? How do questions of language, race, class, and gender impact the experience of colonialism? Students will read novels and short works from a variety of formerly subject nations, including India, Nigera, Egypt, and Ireland. Short segments of theory will guide and accompany these readings. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210, or ENG 218. Fulfills: Topic requirement. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): DIV.

ENG 346 (GWS 346). Victorian Poetry and Prose (3).

This course examines the poetry and non-fiction prose of the Victorian period, which begins with the passage of the First Reform Bill in 1832 and runs concurrently with the reign of Queen Victoria from 1837 to 1901, a period that saw a general shift away from the Romantic emphasis on individualism and subjectivism to a new emphasis on social life and social concerns, including the role of women in both private and public life; that witnessed a comparable shift away from the sanctity of nature to a new emphasis on the discoveries of natural science, including those of Charles Lyell and Charles Darwin; and that marked the unprecedented expansion of British industry and the utmost extension of the British Empire. The course will explore these developments as well as other developments in religion, art, culture and the Victorian imagination in the poetry of Tennyson, Arnold, the Brownings, the Rossettis, Swinburne, Meredith, and Hardy, as well as the non-fiction prose of Carlyle, Hazlitt, Darwin, Marx, Mill, Arnold, Ruskin, Pater, and Wilde, and/or others representative of the period. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Period (Post 1789) requirement.

ENG 347 (GWS 347). The Victorian Novel (3).

An examination of the Victorian novel, addressing the following issues: the ways in which Victorian novels recall and revise romanticism and look forward to modernity; the influences of science, evolution, and industry on the content and form of the novel; representations of domesticity and the attempts of women novelists to rewrite or redefine heroism and tragedy; and Victorian preoccupation with the past, as it affects narrative notions of character and conceptions of literary history. Authors treated include Charlotte Bronte, Emily Bronte, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy and George Eliot. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Genre requirement.

ENG 350 . Amer Lit Survey I:to Civil War (3).

Significant works of the major figures in American literature from the Colonial period to the Civil War. Authors treated include Franklin, Irving, Emerson, Hawthorne, Poe, Thoreau, Melville and Whitman. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218.

ENG 351 . Am Lit SurveyII:CivWar-Present (3).

Significant works of major American writers from 1860 to the present. Authors treated include Dickinson, James, Wharton, Faulkner, Hughes, Rich, Morrison and many others. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218.

ENG 352 . Introduction to Children's Literature (3).

An introduction to literary works written for children, with special emphasis on developing skills for the critical analysis of children's literature and for incorporating it effectively into the school curriculum at different grade levels. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218. Fulfills: Topic requirement.

ENG 355 . Transcendental Literature (3).

A study of the key writers and texts of the 19th-century American transcendental movement. Authors treated include Margaret Fuller, W. H. Charming, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman and Dickinson. Transcendentalism is seen as a partial reaction against 18th-century rationalism, the skeptical philosophy of Locke and the confining religious orthodoxy of New England Calvinism. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218. Fulfills: Period (Post 1789) requirement.

ENG 357 . Performing Literature (3).

This is a basic course in the reading of imaginative literature as an art of solo performance. It is also a course in the study and appreciation of literature-a study aimed at making possible a full sharing of that literature with an audience. Working with three forms of literature-poetry, narrative prose and drama-students will study, workshop and perform short selections in each genre. Prerequisite: WRT 101. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): VPA.

ENG 358 (CMM 358/GWS 358). Representations of the Media in Film (3).

This course is designed to explore ways in which films present myriad images of the mass media when they take as their subject matter the news, documentaries, radio, television, and the film industry itself. The course will develop students' understanding of the nature and function of mass media in American culture and the relationship between power structures and representations of gender in media industries. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Topic requirement.

ENG 361 . Modern British Fiction (3).

A study of the fiction of Conrad, Lawrence, Woolf, Forster, Joyce and other major British authors from about 1900-1940. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218. Fulfills: Period (Post 1789) requirement.

ENG 364 (GWS 354). Modern American Fiction (3).

A study of American fiction of the modernist period (roughly 1915-1950), including representative works by many of the major fiction writers, e.g. Wharton, Faulkner, Glasgow, Hemingway, Hurston, Fitzgerald, Wright. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Period (Post 1789) requirement.

ENG 365 . Modern British and American Poetry (3).

A study of modern poetry from its earliest practitioners (Whitman, Dickinson, Hardy and Hopkins) through to contemporary poets. Emphasis is on the continuities and discontinuities between traditionalist and modernist values and techniques in the major British and American poetry of the 20th century. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218. Fulfills: Genre requirement.

ENG 367 . Yeats (3).

This study of the work of William Butler Yeats places paramount emphasis on the poetry. Some knowledge of the historical and literary context will be required. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 218. Fulfills: Topic requirement.

ENG 368 (THR 368). Modern American Drama (3).

A survey of the major playwrights beginning with O'Neill and normally including Maxwell Anderson, Rice, Odets, Miller, Albee, Wilder, Saroyan and Williams. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Genre requirement.

ENG 369 (THR 369/GWS 357). Modern European Drama (3).

A study of representative plays of European dramatists from the mid- 19th century to the mid-20th centuries. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200 ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Genre requirement.

ENG 371 (CMM 380/GWS 351/THR 371). Critical Approaches to Film (3).

An introduction to film genre, genre theory and film criticism, the course will examine the generic conventions that govern production and reception of film texts. Film genres may include the screwball comedy, the melodrama, the western, the musical, the gangster picture, film noir and others. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Genre requirement. Fulfills Core Requirement(s): VPA.

ENG 372 (THR 372/CMM 381). History of Film: Beginnings to 1940 (3).

This course will survey major developments in cinema from the advent of the medium near the end of the nineteenth century, through the emergence of a syntax for narrative film during the silent era, to the arrival and entrenchment of the sound film in the late 1920s and early 1930s. The nature of the course is such that our concerns will be manifold, but they will surely include attention to the following: the work of several pioneers of the medium-the Lumiere brothers, Thomas Edison (and his major collaborator William Kennedy Laurie Dickinson), George Melies, and Edwin S. Porter; D. W. Griffith's central role in the creation of a "language" for moving images and and his equally significant role in turning film into a popular medium; some of the formal experiments that took place in Germany in the 20s-German expressionism, in particular, as well as the Kammerspielfilm; Soviet montage; French impressionism and surrealism; the great Hollywood comics of the 20s; the development of sound technology and its impact on film form; the importance of genre in the development of the film industry; and French poetic realism. Without scanting attention to such historical matters, we will also, however, want to engage particular film texts: thus much of our time in class will be spent discussing individual films. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

ENG 373 (THR 373/CMM 382). History of Film: 1940 to Present (3).

A study of the developmenbt of film since 1940. The course will examine social, technical, and artistic aspects of important films by influential directors, addressing in particular the well-made Hollywood film, Italian neo-realism, French new wave, and the rise of auteurism. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218.Fulfills Core Requirement(s): VPA.

ENG 378 (CMM 383/GWS 359). The Films of Alfred Hitchcock (3).

In this course, we will examine whether Hitchcock's films can be said to constitute a coherent 'body" of work - identifying in the process potential stylistic idiosyncracies and thematic preoccupations. And we will try to come to some understanding of what is gained and what lost by thinking in these terms. We will use Hitchcock's desire to develop a rigorously cinematic mode of presentation as a means of opening a discussion about the ways films "speak". And we will wonder, along with a handful of contemporary critics, what kind of viewer the films seek to construct. We will take the films' explicit interest in watching as a point of departure for an analysis of voyeurism and its centrality in contemporary western culture. Finally, and not incidentally, we will use the occasion the course provides to spend time watching a number of engaging films. Fulfills core Visual and Performing Arts requirement. (VPA) Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Topic requirement.

ENG 379 . Practicum in English (3).

This course will provide the student who intends to pursue graduate study in English with an intensive review of some of the basic content areas in English literature while also advancing the student's research skills. The student will work closely with an instructor analyzing the pedagogical issues surrounding particular texts, discussing techniques for elicting the most effective papers, and determining ways to make literary works both affecting and relevant. Not only will the student provide tutorial assistance to other students, he or she will also pursue a research project related to the content area of the class under the guidance of the instructor. This course is available only to English literature concentrators. Students will be assigned to professors teaching in the departments Prerequisite: WRT 101 and ENG 218.

ENG 380 (GWS 380/GWS 380). Literature by Women: 17th-19th Century (3).

The works of English and American women writers from the 17th through the 19th century. Covers a wide survey of authors, including complete novels by Fanny Burney, Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte and George Eliot. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Topic requirement.

ENG 381 (GWS 381). Women As Art/Women As Artists (3).

Working with the subject/object distinction made in the visual arts by thinkers like John Berger and Laura Mulvey, this class begins by examining texts in which women are portrayed as beautiful objects, then moves to texts in which women create their own artworks. In all of these works, questions of power, agency, and creativity are central. We will read novels such as Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth, Tracy Chevalier's Girl with a Pearl Earring, and Mary Gordon's Spending, along with A.S. Byatt's The Matisse Stories and a number of other short works. The course also includes art history relevant to the works being studied, and when possible, visits by artists and a trip to museums in New York City. English majors: this counts as a Topics course. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and either ENG 200, ENG 210 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Topic requirement.

ENG 382 (GWS 382). African-American Literature (3).

An introduction to the wide range of African-American literature from slave narratives to present-day authors. Issues include the relation of African-American culture to dominant Anglo culture; the influence of slavery on the lives of African-Americans; African-American self-perception; the roles of gender and economic status. Authors may include Douglass, Jacobs, Chesnutt, Hurston, Hughes, Brooks, Wright, Morrison, Naylor and others. English majors earning certification in Adolescent and Dual Adolescent/Special Education will also study and practice curriculum design and instructional strategies that connect the course's content to today's multi-cultural classrooms. Only English may satisfy the EDU 303 teacher certification requirement by completing this course. Prerequisties: WRT 101 and ENG 200 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Topic requirement.

ENG 383 (GWS 383). American Ethnic Literature (3).

Introduces students to native and immigrant voices in American literature, including Native American writers such as James Welch and Louise Erdrich; Asian-American writers such as Maxine Hong Kingston and Amy Tan; and writers from Latino/a, Arab-American, Jewish and other backgrounds. English majors earning state teacher certification in Adolescent and Dual Adolescent/Special Education will also study and practice curriculum design and instructional strategies that connect the course's content to today's multi-cultural classrooms. Only English majors may satisfy the EDU 303 teacher certification requirement by completing this course. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and ENG 200 or ENG 218. Fulfills: Topic requirement.

ENG 384 (CRW 384). Introduction to Writing Poetry (3).

This introductory creative writing workshop is devoted to the writing and revising of poems. We will explore writing techniques as well as writing samples by established authors, but most of our time will be devoted to critiquing student poems with an eye toward revision and improvement. Students will complete a final portfolio of poetry to be submitted at the end of term.

ENG 385 (CRW 385). Creative Writing Workshop (3).

Intensive practice in the writing and criticism of poetry and fiction. Associated readings geared to the needs of the individual participant. Prerequisite: WRT 101. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

ENG 386 (THR 386/CRW 386). Introduction to Playwriting (3).

A workshop that introduces students to the techniques of dramatic writing. In our explorations of structure, dialogue and methods of characterization, students begin by writing one- to two- page exercises, advance to outlines for plot and character and finally write a ten-minute play which is performed in class. Prerequisite: WRT 101. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

ENG 387 (CRW 387/CMM 387). Scriptwriting (3).

This course provides study and practice in the special requirements of writing fictional works for television and film. This course will focus on: basic dramatic structures and story telling, the premise, the pitch, character development, writing the treatment, story outlines, writing the master scene and completing the script. At semester end, students are expected to produce full-length tele-plays, radio dramas or film scripts. Prerequisite: WRT 101. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

ENG 389 (CRW 389/THR 389). Writing the One Act Play (3).

The goal of this writing workshop is to write a one-act play. The course is designed for students who have some experience with writing plays or a strong creative writing background. Students will first explore the techniques of dramatic writing through examples, exercises, and class discussion, advance to plot outlines and character sketches, and finally write a one-act play, which will be performed in class. Prerequisite: WRT 101. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

ENG 390 . Independent Study (1-3).

A student who wishes to pursue an independent project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration, a proposed plan that includes a description of the project and its goals, the methods to be followed, a schedule of work and supervision, an evaluation procedure and the number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair and the academic dean. It will be kept on file in the academic dean's office.

ENG 391 (CRW 391). Advanced Poetry Workshop (3).

A poetry writing workshop for students who have completed the introductory creative writing workshop or who can demonstrate advanced creative writing abilities. The course requires a close study of poems by major modern and contemporary authors and may include exercises in traditional forms. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and CRW/ENG 385. Fulfills Core requirement(s): VPA.

ENG 392 (CRW 392). Advanced Fiction Workshop (3).

A fiction writing workshop for students who have completed the introductory creative writing workshop or who can demonstrate advanced fiction writing ability. The course requires the reading of major modern and contemporary authors, weekly short writing assignments and the writing of an extended work of prose fiction or a linked series of short stories. Fulfills core Visual and Performing Arts requirement. (VPA) Prerequisites: WRT 101 and CRW/ENG 385.

ENG 393 . Teaching and Tutoring Writing (3).

This course introduces students to methods for teaching and tutoring writing. The course examines different pedagogical approaches within the context of one-on-one tutoring. Topics discussed include assisting students in all parts of the writing process, providing grammatical help, tutoring in unfamiliar disciplines, and working with ESL writers. Students apply the concepts and practices discussed in the class as writing tutors in the "Tutoring @ Le Moyne" program. Students who successfully complete the course can apply to continue as writing tutors. This seminar course is discussion and writing intensive. Prerequisite: WRT 101.

ENG 395 (CRW 395). Nonfiction Writing Workshop (3).

A workshop that will introduce students, through writing assignments, to the many varieties of creative nonfiction, including the personal essay, memoir, travel writing, the lyric essay, the portrait, and the political essay. We'll engage the eternal concerns and debates of nonfiction writing, including: what it means to tell the "truth", representing the "I" or first-person narrator as a character, telling other people's secrets, the (un)reliability of memory, etc. We'll learn how to use traditional fiction techniques (scene, character, setting, dialogue) in nonfiction, as well as practice techniques more typically seen in creative nonfiction, such as enacting on the page the writer's "story of thought." On occasion this writing workshop will be offered with a particular focus,such as writing about science, family, or sports. The focus will be announced in advance of registration. Prerequisite: WRT 101.

ENG 397 (CMM 397). Writing Nonfiction: (3).

A course in writing for general audiences on topics that will vary from one semester to the next; topics may include the fine arts, nature/the environment, science, the family, popular culture, and politics. These courses will be both reading-and writing-intensive, with readings serving as models and resources for students own writing; outside research in the form of interviews, observations/site visits, or attendance at cultural events will also be a component. Prerequisite: WRT 101.

ENG 400 . Seminar Literature & Rhetoric (3).

A selection of interdisciplinary seminars centered on literature, media, or rhetoric but integrating other components of a Le Moyne education, thus helping students see the interconnectedness of disciplines. Designed to reach beyond the traditional limits of literary study, these seminars will also encourage students to enhance their speaking and writing skills. Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218, and ENG 300.

ENG 402 . Literary Utopias and Dystopias (3).

This course encourages students to explore the relationships between imaginative literature and a variety of disciplines. Proceeding chronologically, we will begin with several western utopias and move into modern and contemporary dystopias -some of which address the "problem" of being non-western or female in an ostensibly perfect world. Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218 and ENG 300.

ENG 403 . Writing and Speaking in the Professions (3).

A course designed to train students to write efficient business documents and to present effective oral briefings in an organizational setting. Students will consider ethical issues faced in careers, methods of persuasion, audience analysis and writing issues of clarity, conciseness and courtesy, among others. Literature about business will be a basis for presentations. Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218 and ENG 300.

ENG 404 (GWS 404). Literature and Psychology (3).

A seminar employing psychological approaches in analyzing and writing about literary texts. In examining fiction, poetry and drama by writers from Sophocles to Toni Morrison, the course includes such topics as archetypes, defense mechanisms, psychological disorders, family dramas, therapeutic relationships, the psychology of women or the psychology of the artist. Contributions of selected psychological theorists provide a foundation for discussion of literary texts. Prior knowledge of psychology is not required. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218, and ENG 300.

ENG 405 (GWS 408). Gender and Literature (3).

Students will explore issues of gender formation and gender identity (in the United States) as described in the literature. The course covers a variety of eras as well as authors from various backgrounds. Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218 and ENG 300.

ENG 406 . Hamlet: Views and Variations (3).

Intensive study of Hamlet itself will be supplemented by consideration of interpretations of the play from a variety of perspectives (such as feminism, Marxism, and psychoanalysis). The course will also look at Shakespeare's sources, adaptations of Hamlet for other media (such as film and television), and artwork, music and other plays inspired by it. Fulfills core Visual and Performing Arts requirement. (VPA) Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218, and ENG 300.

ENG 407 . Literature and the Environment (3).

Examination of the views of nature and the environment as seen by selected writers, poets, and essayists of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The readings, discussions, and written assignments will explore the aesthetics, the socio-political climate and the prevailing attitudes toward the environment that formed the background for readings. Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218 and ENG 300.

ENG 408 . The Holocaust in Literature and Film (3).

European and American writers whose pens bore witness to the horrors of the Nazi concentration camps. Through nonfictional memoirs and imaginative accounts, this course will document how survivors of the holocaust forged a resilient art out of the pain they endured. Films and guest speakers will supplement the reading materials. Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218 and ENG 300.

ENG 409 . Celtic Literature (3).

This course explores ancient and modern Irish and Welsh literary traditions with emphasis on the mythological, historical and political backgrounds of the literature. Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218, and ENG 300.

ENG 411 . Cultural Perspectives on Medicine (3).

Drawing on a combination of classic literary texts and modern meditations on the practice of medicine this course explores the intersection of medicine and literature and seeks to understand our perceptions of disease as a cultural phenomenon. Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218 and ENG 300.

ENG 412 (GWS 412). American Outlaws and Outcasts (3).

Exploration of American literature from a cultural perspective, particularly its fascination with characters who transgress, manipulate and confront the boundaries that demark American culture. We will focus on a variety of figures who are both powerful and marginal: writers, criminals, clowns and lovers. We will compare America's painted and tainted ladies with its masked lone rangers to see what difference gender makes in the terms and consequences of their isolation. Perequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218 and ENG 300.

ENG 413 . Contemporary Catholic Fiction (3).

A close look at several major Catholic writers of the twentieth century, all of whom bring to their art a specifically Catholic perspective: "a conviction of the open-ended mystery of matter," an appreciation of ritual, an understanding of paradox and a way of looking at the world that takes seriously the implications of believing in the Incarnation, ie. that God has joined the human struggle. The course combines literary and theological methods with a broad cultural perspective to understand better what Catholicism means in the last half of the twentieth century. Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218 and ENG 300.

ENG 414 (GWS 414). Amer Film Noir & Femme Fatale (3).

This core course will trace the development of film noir and the femme fatale through the original cycle of noir films of the '40s and '50s to later and neo-films. We will look at the socio-historical contexts of these films in order to generate questions not only about the cultural origins and revisions of the genre, but also about the effectiveness and viability of contemporary representations of the femme fatale. Students will present submissions each week in response to films and assigned readings. Fulfills core Visual and Performing Arts requirement. (VPA) Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218 and ENG 300.

ENG 415 (GWS 415). 12 American Films:Auteurism (3).

A socio-historical study of the works of six exceptional American film directors of the twentieth century. We will approach the films of Billy Wilder, Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick, Martin Scorcese and Woody Allen through the perspective of. 1) socio-historical context, 2) genre study, and 3) auteurism (film director as author/artist). Focus on theme of viewing and being viewed, and the larger issues of performance raised by this theme, including the process of becoming a public image and the representation of the artist-figure and actor. Significant attention to the representation of women as objects of vision. Fulfills core Visual and Performing Arts requirement.(VPA)Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218, and ENG 300.

ENG 416 . Literature, Film and Culture (3).

Examination of the cultural climates of various written texts and the films that are based on them. We will explore the social circumstances that have given rise to revisions of particular texts as we discuss the way in which the films studied are true or untrue to the earlier works on which they are based. We will also examine the literary nature of all the works, asking how we read film differently from the way we read written texts. Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218, and ENG 300.

ENG 417 . Arthurian Legend (3).

This interdisciplinary course focuses on the medieval origins and later developments of the Arthurian legend in its varying forms, especially in English literature. Questioning why revitalizations of interest in Arthurian ideals occur when they do, class members will consider cultural and political contexts as well as the moral and psychological issues that writers such as Malory and Tennyson raise. Given the multiple translations and transformation involved, students will further challenge themselves to understand the nature of literary and other imitations. Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218 and ENG 300.

ENG 418 . Literature and Revolution (3).

This interdisciplinary seminar explores a variety of interactions between literary texts and their socio political contexts, especially during periods of revolutionary turbulence. Focus is on the immediate historical settings in which particular creative works were written, the events by which they were affected and the events that they, in turn, helped to shape. Roughly equal attention is devoted to the aesthetic and the historical dimension. Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218, and ENG 300.

ENG 419 (GWS 419). Contemp Irish Lit and Politics (3).

This interdisciplinary core seminar will explore the major writers of post-Civil War Irish literature, focusing on the novelists, poets and playwrights who have responded to and helped shape an Ireland very different from that of the 1916 Rising. We shall read selectively in the fiction, poetry and drama of the period, with special attention to the intersection of politics and imagination in contemporary Irish culture. Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218 and ENG 300.

ENG 420 . Race and Ethnicity in Early America (3).

This interdisciplinary course explores the fluctuating categories of racial identity from both historical and literary perspectives. Proceeding chronologically, we will utilize both fictional and nonfictional materials to investigate how ethnic and national identities were transformed into ever-shifting classifications of white, black and red. Readings, research and discussion. Fulfills ENG/HST senior core requirement.

ENG 421 . Literature and Education (3).

The focus of this 400-level course in Literature and Education will be the relationship that exists between the structures of education and the practice of educating as it appears in a variety of texts. We will explore the enterprise of education as it appears in literature as well as from historical, philosophical, sociological and educational theory perspectives. We will read from a wide variety of texts and will consider the aims of education, the relationship between student and teacher, the disconnect between educational theory and practice and education as instrument of change as it is presented in literary worlds. Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218 and ENG 300.

ENG 422 (GWS 422). Literature and Science (3).

This course explores relationships between literature and science through a study of drama, poetry, scientific articles, and nonfiction writing about science, most of it from the 20th century. We will look at how literature represents and interprets scientific practice and concepts, and how scientific texts use literary and rhetorical techniques to communicate with and persuade audiences. Topics include women and science, the languages of science, and heroes/anti-heroes of science. Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218, and ENG 300.

ENG 423 . Introduction to Cultural Studies (3).

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of cultural studies, which itself takes the theories and practices of textual analysis, combines them with the theories and practices of social analysis - especially those of psychoanalysis, anthropolgy, sociolgy, gender studies and feminism - and applies them to contemporary cultural objects, in the interest of demonstrating how such objects are formed at the intersection of various cultural forces and how they reproduce dominant cultural values, often problematic cultural values including cultural prejudices and structures of power. Cultural studies offers a valuable analysis for social progress and change. Prerequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218, and ENG 300.

ENG 424 . Literature and Music (3).

Works of literature have often been transformed and recreated in musical form, though the process has occassionally worked in the opposite way. This course aims to study works in several literary forms (poetry, novels and drama) to consider what happens when they are transformed into a variety of musical forms (e.g. opera, popular musicals, rock and gospel) - or vice versa. We will focus particularly on the effect that the addition or deletion of music has on the tone, theme and characterization of each of these works, and thus try to sharpen our sense of how music creates meaning. Prerequisites or corequisites: WRT 101, ENG 200 or ENG 218, and ENG 300.

ENG 427 (ENG 327). The Culture and Literature of Harlem (3).

This course will explore the fiction, music, art, and the political and philosophical writing that emerged during the period known as The Harlem Renaissance. We will begin by tracing the historical developments that made possible the formation of Harlem, as both a place and an idea. Beginning with the writing of Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth, we will listen to nineteenth century Black voices as they set the stage for even more complex expressions of Black identity, citizenship, and culture. We will debate W.E.B. Dubois' claim that race is a product of "blood and culture" and we will explore the ways in which various high art of salons and galleries and the popular culture of speakeasys and clubs-participated in trying to solve the 'problem' of being-as Louis Armstrong sang it-both "Black and Blue." Finally, we will listen carefully to the powerful voices of artists such as Zora Neale Hurston who celebrate their racial identity and who invite us-Black, White, Brown, and Yellow-to join in that celebration. Fulfills: Topic requirement.

ENG 428 (PSC 428/THR 428). Politics and Literature (3).

Does literature reflect on the use of power, authority, ideology and identity? How does literature affect us and the way we interpret the political world? What makes theatre political? What hopes for changing the world does theatre dramatize? How does the theatre become a productive site for representing, and even enacting, political change? This course explores these questions by reading various literary works including a number of plays from different time periods. The encompassing question this course tries to answer (by analyzing the perspectives of different authors) is: What does it mean to have political freedom?

ENG 447 (HST 447). Seduction&Betrayal in Ancient Med World (3).

What causes a person to be seduced, or lead astray, from proper conduct or from previously held principles? What does it mean to be betrayed? How do various forms of seduction and betrayal - personal, psychological, social, political - manifest themselves? How do individuals, families, and communities respond to and attempt to recover from seductions and betrayals? In this Seminar we will consider the personal, political, historical, and cultural implications of the above questions by examining Classical ancient texts and their continuing influence on the contemporary world. Beginning with a blood-soaked tale that features a victorious war hero who is seduced and betrayed by his adulterous wife, this Seminar will culminate in a multi-media investigation of the enigmatic figure of Cleopatra, the real-life historical ruler of Egypt, (in)famous for her seductive charms that captivated the Romans Caesar and Mark Antony. After her suicide, Cleopatra was reinvented while her corpse was practically still warm by the poet Horace, was later famously portrayed in Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra, and was yet again immortalized centuries later in Mankiewicz's 1963 extravagant blockbuster film. Looking at a range of sources, including ancient historical accounts and sculpture, Renaissance paintings, a modern comic book, and the recent HBO television series "Rome," we will interrogate the distinctions between fact and fiction and will explore the living legacy of the ancient Mediterranean world.

ENG 455 (CCM 422/CCM 522). Medicine in Literature and Film (3).

The relationship between literature and medicine will be explored through the study of novels, short stories, essays and films about medical situations, characters and themes. Thematic areas to be examined include medical ethics in literature; the hospital as environment; relationships between health care workers and patients; illness as metaphor and as reality. Discussion on what writers are communicating and how they do so will emphasize characterization, setting, tone and point of view.

ENG 480 . Honors Tutorial (3).

WRT 100 . Introduction to Critical Writing (3).

This 3-credit, pass/fail course will for some students be a prerequisite for WRT 101. Admission to WRT 101 will be based on a prior selection process. This course develops basic writing skills such as paper organization, paragraphing, thesis-building, and argumentation. It also focuses on fundamental issues of syntax and grammar. Students will be expected to revise several papers and to participate in writing workshops. One of the primary functions of this class will be to prepare students for successful completion of WRT 101. Pass/fail only.

WRT 101 . Critical Writing (3).

Practice in the skills of critical thinking, critical reading, and especially critical writing. Students will analyze selected essays and articles in conjunction with frequent writing assignments. Students will be expected to gain and demonstrate college-level proficiency in critical reading, critical writing, and standard English grammar and usage.

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