Mathematics and Computer Science

Chair: Michael J. Miller
Program Director: David P. Voorhees
Professor(s): Sul-Young Choi, Lifang Hsu
Associate Professor(s): William V. Miller, Michael J. Schramm
Assistant Professor(s): Shaun Ceci, Caitlin Cunningham, Aparna Das, David A. Nash, Jonathan Needleman, Trijya Singh
Professor Emeritus: Edwin F. Baumgartner, Thomas S. Frank, William C. Rinaman Jr., James F. Smith, S.J.
Adjunct(s): William J. Collins, Emory Creel, Kathy Dilmore, Ludmila Kleiner, Daniel R. Maravi


The mathematics program serves two primary functions: 1) to offer students majoring in mathematics a well-rounded, career-oriented program in mathematics, and 2) to offer other students careful instruction in using the mathematical tools required by their disciplines. In keeping with the first objective, the department requires its majors to complete a common core of eight mathematics courses (including a senior research project—see below), to complete courses in each of three cognate fields (foreign language, computer science and natural science) and to concentrate further in one of five areas (pure mathematics, applied mathematics, statistics, actuarial science, education) by completing a sequence of at least four additional mathematics courses and a variable number (depending on concentration—see below) of other courses. Majors must declare their area of concentration by the end of their sophomore year.

Mathematics Major

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

Mathematics Major

Major RequirementsHours
Concentration requirements** 12-36
CSC 175 Introduction to Algorithms and Program Design 4
CSC 176 Object Oriented Programming 3
MTH 145 Calculus I 4
MTH 146 Calculus II 4
MTH 245 Calculus III 4
MTH 261 Linear Algebra 3
MTH 311 Introduction to Probability Theory 3
MTH 332 Real Analysis 4
MTH 341 Abstract Algebra 3
MTH 494 Preparation for Mathematical Research 1
MTH 495 Senior Research Project 3
Major SupportHours
In addition, one of the following three science course sequences and one foreign language course are required:
PHY 105 General Physics Scientists/Engineers I3
PHY 106 General Physics Scientists/Engineers II3
PHY 103 General Physics Laboratory1
PHY 104 General Physics Laboratory1
CHM 151 Chemical Principles I3
CHM 151L Chemical Principles I Laboratory1
CHM 152 Chemical Principles II3
CHM 152L Chemical Principles II Lab1
BIO 191 General Biology I4
BIO 192 General Biology II4
Foreign Language (intermediate or advanced level recommended)3
Free Electives (depends on concentration)0-27

** By the end of the second semester of the sophomore year, the student is expected to select a concentration. The concentrations, and their requirements, are listed separately.

Applied Mathematics Concentration

Concentration CoursesHours
MTH 260 Discrete Mathematics 3
MTH 303 Differential Equations and Mathematical Modeling 3
MTH 421 Numerical Methods 3
MTH 312 Mathematical Statistics or MTH 313 Applied Statistics3
One additional MTH course, either from the following list or approved by the department chair:
MTH 307 Combinatorial Mathematics and Graph Theory3
MTH 312 Mathematical Statistics3
MTH 313 Applied Statistics3
MTH 431 Introduction to Complex Analysis3
Completion of a minor, either from the following list or approved by the department chair:
Computer Science (partially fulfilled by major and concentration requirements) 15*
Biology (may be partially fulfilled by major support) 15**
Chemistry (may be partially fulfilled by major support) 15**
Physics (may be partially fulfilled by major support) 23**

* Since MTH 260 is cross listed as CSC 281, only 6 additional credit hours are needed to complete this concentration

** If this is the same field of study as the science sequence, only 7 additional credit hours are needed to complete this minor.

Pure Mathematics Concentration

Concentration CoursesHours
MTH 260 Discrete Mathematics 3
Four additional MTH courses, either from the following list or approved by the department chair.
MTH 303 Differential Equations and Mathematical Modeling3
MTH 306 Topics in Number Theory3
MTH 307 Combinatorial Mathematics and Graph Theory3
MTH 361 Modern Geometry3
MTH 370 Intermediate Problem Solving3
MTH 431 Introduction to Complex Analysis3
MTH 481 Topology3

Statistics Concentration

Concentration CoursesHours
MTH 260 Discrete Mathematics 3
MTH 312 Mathematical Statistics 3
MTH 313 Applied Statistics 3
Two additional MTH courses, either from the following list or approved by the department chair.
MTH 421 Numerical Methods3
MTH 431 Introduction to Complex Analysis3

Actuarial Science Concentration

Concentration CoursesHours
MTH 313 Applied Statistics 3
Three additional MTH courses, either from the following list or approved by the department chair.
MTH 303 Differential Equations and Mathematical Modeling3
MTH 312 Mathematical Statistics3
MTH 370 Intermediate Problem Solving3
MTH 421 Numerical Methods3
ECO 113 Principles of Microeconomics 3
ECO 114 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
ACT 203 Financial Accounting 3
FIN 301 Managerial Finance 3
FIN 401 Investments 3
Free Electives 9
The following courses are approved for VEE credits by SOA, CIA and CSA:
MTH 313 Applied Statistics3
FIN 301 Managerial Finance3
FIN 401 Investments3
ECO 113 Principles of Microeconomics3
ECO 114 Principles of Macroeconomics3

Adolescent Education Concentration (Grades 7-12)

Concentration CoursesHours
MTH 361 Modern Geometry 3
MTH 370 Intermediate Problem Solving 3
Two additional MTH courses, either from the following list or approved by the department chair.
MTH 303 Differential Equations and Mathematical Modeling3
MTH 306 Topics in Number Theory3
MTH 307 Combinatorial Mathematics and Graph Theory3
MTH 312 Mathematical Statistics3

For courses required for teacher certification, refer to the Department of Education. For ENG 300, students must register for Shakespeare.

Dual Childhood/Special Education Concentration (Grades 1-6)

Concentration CoursesHours
MTH 361 Modern Geometry 3
MTH 370 Intermediate Problem Solving 3
Two additional MTH courses, either from the following list or approved by the department chair.
MTH 303 Differential Equations and Mathematical Modeling3
MTH 306 Topics in Number Theory3
MTH 307 Combinatorial Mathematics and Graph Theory3
MTH 312 Mathematical Statistics3

For courses required for teacher certification, refer to the Department of Education. For ENG 300, students must register for Shakespeare.

Typical Program for Mathematics Major

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
MTH 1454 MTH 1464
CSC 1754 CSC 1763
Foreign Language3 PHL 1103
COR 1003 EAC3
WRT 1013 HST 111 (a)3
Sophomore Year
MTH 2454 MTH 3324
MTH 261/MTH 2603 ENG 2103
HST 110 (a)3 Theology3
PHL 2103 Social Science3
Elective (b)3 Elective (b)/MTH 2613
Junior Year
MTH 3113 MTH Concentration3
Science Elective4 Science Elective4
MTH 341/MTH Concen.3 MTH Concentration3
ENG 3103 IDS3
Elective (b)3 Elective (b)3
Senior Year
MTH Concentration or MTH 3413 MTH 4953
COR 400A3 MTH Concentration3
Elective (DIV)3 Religion3
Elective3 Elective (VPA)3
Elective (b)3 Elective3

NOTE: This typical program is for all concentrations except education and applied mathematics.

(a) HST 110 and HST 111 can be taken in either order.

(b) For the actuarial science concentration, the electives must include ECO 113, ECO 114, ACT 203, FIN 301 and FIN 401.

Typical Program for Applied Mathematics Concentration

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
MTH 1454 MTH 1464
CSC 1754 CSC 1763
WRT 1013 HST 1113
COR 1003 PHL 1103
Foreign Language3 EAC3
Sophomore Year
MTH 2454 MTH 3033
MTH 2603 MTH 3324
MTH 2613 ENG 2103
HST 1103 PHL 2103
Science Elective4 Science Elective4
Junior Year
MTH 3113 MTH 312/3133
MTH 341/4213 Theology3
ENG 3103 IDS3
Minor Course3/4 Minor Course3/4
Elective3 Elective3
Senior Year
MTH 341/4213 MTH 4953
COR 4003 MTH Concentration3
Social Science3 Religion3
Elective (DIV)3 Elective (VPA)3
Elective3 Elective3

Typical Program for Adolescent Education Concentration (Grades 7-12)

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
MTH 1454 EDU 1053
Foreign Language3 MTH 1464
COR 1003 CSC 1763
CSC 1754 EAC3
Sophomore Year
PHL 2103 HST 1113
Science Elective4 Science Elective4
MTH 2613 MTH Concentration3
MTH 2454 MTH 3324
EDU 2153 EDU 1503
Junior Year
HST 1103 ENG 2103
Theology3 Religion3
MTH 3113 MTH Concentration3
MTH 341/MTH Concen.3 MTH Concentration3
EDU 3033 EDU 3253
EDU 3153 EDU 3353
Senior Year
MTH 4953 EDU 1200
MTH Concen./MTH 3413 EDU 4053
COR 4003 EDU 4606
EDU 4014 EDU 4506
ENG 3103
IDS (VPA)3

NOTE: Students in the Adolescent/Special Education Concentration should consult with their advisor about taking EDU 225 and EDU 345.

Typical Program for Dual Childhood/Special Education Concentration (Grades 1-6)

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
WRT 1013 EAC3
MTH 1454 PHL 1103
Foreign Language3 EDU 1053
COR 1003 MTH 1464
CSC 1754 CSC 1763
Sophomore Year
PHL 2103 Science Elective4
Science Elective4 HST 1113
MTH 2613 MTH Concentration3
MTH 2454 MTH 3324
EDU 2053 EDU 2253
Junior Year
HST 1103 EDU 1503
Theology3 Religion3
MTH 3113 MTH Concentration3
MTH 3413 EDU 3653
EDU 3053 EDU 3753
EDU 3153 ENG 2103
Senior Year
EDU 1200 MTH Concentration3
EDU 4053 MTH 4953
EDU 4306 MTH Concentration3
EDU 4316 COR 4003
ENG 3103
IDS (VPA)3

Mathematics Minor

To graduate with a minor in mathematics, a student must complete a program approved by the department chair consisting of at least five mathematics courses numbered 145 or higher including at least one mathematics course numbered 300 or higher. No course may be taken pass/fail.

Computer Science

Program Director: David Voorhees

This program's strength is in the liberal arts tradition - students receive broad exposure to other disciplines while obtaining a solid foundation in computer science. Its distinctive features include:

1) A Curriculum that covers the breath of computer science topics and allows specialization through electives.

Our curriculum is designed to introduce students to the breath of computer science topics from the practical to the theoretical. It focuses on fundamental concepts and principals in computer science and treats the latest trending technologies as current examples of these concepts. Our goal is to prepare students to be problem solvers who are adaptable to the rapidly changing nature of technology, rather than to be a specialist only in today's trending technologies. Our required courses cover topics such as software architecture and design, program design, algorithm analysis, and operating systems. Elective courses, taken in the last two years of the program, allow students to customize their learning based on individual interests. We offer electives on topics such as software design, secure software development, artificial intelligence, mobile computing and networks. Course projects encompass a range of sizes and domains, with opportunities for students to experience software engineering from an individual and team perspective. At the culmination of the major, all students complete a significant senior project where knowledge acquired across various courses must be combined and applied.

2) Lots of interaction with faculty members and ample opportunities to learn from peers.

Computer science majors at Le Moyne are part of a small close knit community with lots of interaction with faculty members and with other students in the major. Students are advised by the same faculty member throughout the major, thus allowing for more personal counseling. The weekly laboratory session of our intro course, where students get hands-on experience with topics learned in the classroom, is taught by faculty rather than a teaching assistant. Many of our courses include projects and assignments which are done in pairs or triples to encourage students to learn from their peers. We also hire upper-level students as tutors within Le Moyne's Academic Support Center.

3) A requirement to earn a minor in another discipline.

All computer science majors minor in another discipline which provides students with an opportunity to combine computer science with another subject area, as it is increasingly done in the real world.

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

B.S. Computer Science

Major RequirementsHours
CSC 175 Introduction to Algorithms and Program Design 4
CSC 176 Object Oriented Programming 3
CSC 181 Bits, Nibbles, and Bytes 3
CSC 275 Data Structures and Algorithms 3
CSC 281 Discrete Mathematics 3
CSC 346 Software Operating Environments 3
CSC 375 Design and Analysis of Algorithms 3
CSC 495 Senior Research Project or CSC 496 Senior Software Engineering Project3
Four upper-level CSC electives from the computer science course groups listed below. Two courses must be programming instensive and one course must be theory intensive. 12
Major SupportHours
MTH 145 Calculus I 4
MTH 146 Calculus II 4
Foreign Language (intermediate or advanced level recommended) 6
Natural science lab-based sequence 8
Minor in another discipline 15-21
ElectivesHours
Programming Intensive Upper-level Electives
CSC 276 Object-Oriented Software Design3
CSC 411 Introduction of Artificial Intelligence3
CSC 441 Secure Software Development in Mobile And Cloud Environments3
CSC 445 Networks and Secure Software Development3
Theory Intensive Upper-Level Electives
CSC 355 Programming Languages & Paradigms3
CSC 376 Software Engineering3
CSC 471 Models of Computation3

Additional courses may be added to the computer science course groups when the course contains at least ten lecture hours found in CS2013 (the most recent ACM/IEEE Computer Science Curriculum Guidelines) that are not covered by the CSC required courses listed above.

B.A. Computer Science

Major RequirementsHours
CSC 175 Introduction to Algorithms and Program Design 4
CSC 176 Object Oriented Programming 3
CSC 181 Bits, Nibbles, and Bytes 3
CSC 275 Data Structures and Algorithms 3
CSC 281 Discrete Mathematics 3
CSC 346 Software Operating Environments 3
CSC 375 Design and Analysis of Algorithms 3
CSC 495 Senior Research Project or CSC 496 Senior Software Engineering Project3
Four upper-level CSC electives from the computer science course groups listed above. Two courses must be programming instensive and one course must be theory intensive. 12
Major SupportHours
MTH 145 Calculus I 4
Foreign Language (intermediate or advanced level recommended) 6
Minor in another discipline 15-21

Computer Science with a Concentration in Pre-Engineering

The computer science B.S. may be taken with a pre-engineering concentration to serve as the foundation for the Dual Bachelor’s/Master’s Engineering Program with Syracuse University. Students enrolled in one of the computer science-based Bachelor’s/Master’s engineering programs must choose from one of the following concentrations:

  • Computer science with concentration in pre-engineering: computer science
  • Computer science with concentration in pre-engineering: computer engineering

Please note that a student enrolled in one of these two computer science pre-engineering concentrations satisfy the computer science major requirement to minor in another academic discipline.

See the Undergraduate Transfer Programs for additional information on this Dual Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree in Engineering Program with Syracuse University.

Typical Program for B.S. Computer Science

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
CSC 1754 CSC 1763
MTH 1454 MTH 1464
EAC3 EAC3
WRT 1013 CSC 1813
COR 1003 HST 1113
Sophomore Year
CSC 2753 CSC 346/CSC Elective3
CSC 2813 Elective3
Natural Science (with lab)4 Natural Science (with lab)4
HST 1103 Elective3
PHL 1103 PHL 2103
Junior Year
CSC 3753 CSC 346/CSC Elective3
CSC Elective3 CSC Elective3
Elective3 Elective3
ENG 2103 ENG 3103
Social Science3 Theology3
Senior Year
CSC 495 or 4963 CSC Elective3
CSC Elective3 Elective3
Elective3 Elective3
IDS3 COR 400A3
VPA1 Religion3

Typical Program for B.A. Computer Science

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
CSC 1754 CSC 1763
MTH 1454 CSC 1813
EAC3 EAC3
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
COR 1003 HST 1113
Sophomore Year
CSC 2753 CSC 346/CSC Elective3
CSC 2813 Elective3
Elective3 Elective3
HST 1103 Social Science3
PHL 2103 ENG 2103
Junior Year
CSC 3753 CSC 346/CSC Elective3
CSC Elective3 CSC Elective3
Elective3 Elective3
Natural Science3 IDS3
ENG 3103 Theology3
Senior Year
CSC 495 or 4963 CSC Elective3
CSC Elective3 Elective3
Elective3 Elective3
COR 400A3 Elective3
VPA1 Religion3

Typical Program for Computer Science with a Concentration in Pre-Engineering: Computer Science

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
CSC 1754 CSC 1763
MTH 1454 CSC 1813
WRT 1013 MTH 1464
EAC3 HST 1113
COR 1003 EAC3
Sophomore Year
CSC 2753 CSC 346/CSC Elective3
CSC 2813 Social Science3
MTH 2454 ENG 2103
Natural Science w/ Lab4 Natural Science w/ Lab4
HST 1103 PHL 1103
Junior Year
CSC 3753 CSC 346/CSC Elective3
CSC 355/CSC Elective3 CSC 471/CSC Elective3
MTH 2613 ENG 3103
PHL 2103 Theology3
PHY 1031 IDS3
PHY 1053
Senior Year
CSC 495 or 4963 CSC Elective3
CSC 355 or CSC Elective3 CSC 471 or CSC Elective3
MTH 3113 Elective3
COR 400A3 Elective3
VPA1 Religion3
Fifth Year
Syracuse University CS Masters program

Typical Program for Computer Science with a Concentration in Pre-Engineering: Computer Engineering

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
CSC 1754 CSC 1763
MTH 1454 MTH 146 4
PHY 1031 PHY 1041
PHY 1053 PHY 1063
WRT 1013 HST 1113
COR 1003 CSC 1813
Sophomore Year
CSC 2813 CSC 346 or CSC Elective3
CSC 2753 Social Science3
MTH 2454 PHL 2103
ELE 231/291 (2)4 ELE 232/292 (2)4
PHL 1103 CSE 261 (2)3
HST 1103
Junior Year
CSC 3753 CSC 346 or CSC Elective3
ENG 2103 CSE 458 (2)3
CSE 397 (2)3 CSE 398 (2)3
VPA1 ENG 3103
CSE 381 (2)3 Theology3
CSE 384 (2)3 CSC 471 or IDS3
Senior Year
CSE 491 (2)1 COR 400A3
MTH 3113 CSC 471 or IDS3
Religion3 CSE 492 (2)3
EAC3 CSC Elective3
CSC Elective3 EAC3
CHM 1513
CHM 151L1
Fifth Year
Syracuse University CE Masters program

(2) Taken at Syracuse University

Computer Science Minor

To graduate with a minor in computer science, a student must complete a program approved by the program director consisting of at least five computer science courses numbered 175 or higher. No course may be taken pass/fail.

Software Applications and Systems Development

Program Director: David Voorhees

This program's strength is in the liberal arts tradition - students receive broad exposure to other disciplines with a solid foundation in developing software applications and systems. A distinctive feature is a requirement to minor in another academic discipline. The SASD program combines the strengths of Le Moyne's computer science and information systems programs in a complementary way while adhering to the latest curriculum guidelines for software engineering.

The software applications and systems development (SASD) program combines software programming and software design from the computer science (CS) program with business analysis and project planning from the information systems (IS) program. A significant difference between the SASD and CS programs are in the mathematics requirements. The SASD program requires a student to take either Mathematics for Business Majors or Brief Calculus while the CS program requires a student to take Calculus I. There are two significant differences between the SASD and IS programs. First, the SASD program requires a student to earn a minor in any academic discipline while the IS program requires a student to take the Business core courses. Second, the SASD program requires a student to complete a sequence of programming courses while the IS program includes programming courses as an elective.

Core RequirementsHours
COR 100 First Year Seminar3
WRT 101 Critical Writing3
PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy3
HST 110 - HST 111 World Civilization6
ENG 210 Major Authors3
PHL 210 Moral Philosophy3
Theology3
EAC Encountering Another Culture/Language6
ENG 310 Literature and Culture3
Mathematics*3
Social Science*3
Natural Science*3
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies*3
Religion3
COR 400 Transformations3
Visual & Performing Arts*1
Diversity*0

* NOTE: Some Core requirements may be fulfilled by major requirements. See core section for more information. Because there have been substantial changes to the core curriculum, the above requirements may not apply to all students; for students who entered Le Moyne College prior to Fall 2013, be sure to consult with your advisor for appropriate course selection(s).

B.S. Software Applications and Systems Development

Major RequirementsHours
CSC 175 Introduction to Algorithms and Program Design 4
CSC 176 Object Oriented Programming 3
CSC 275 Data Structures and Algorithms 3
CSC 276 Object-Oriented Software Design 3
CSC 346 Software Operating Environments 3
CSC 375 Design and Analysis of Algorithms 3
CSC or MIS elective 3
MIS 201 Intro Mgmt Info Systems 3
MIS 375 Applied Systems Analysis 3
MIS 460 Managing Systems Projects 3
MIS 480 Database Management Systems 3
MIS 499 Independ Study in Info Systems (Honors) or CSC 496 Senior Software Engineering Project3
Major SupportHours
MTH 120 Mathematics for Business Majors 3
CSC 281 Discrete Mathematics 3
Foreign Language (intermediate or advanced level recommended) 6
Natural science lab-based sequence 8
Minor in another discipline 15-21

B.A. Software Applications and Systems Development

Major RequirementsHours
CSC 175 Introduction to Algorithms and Program Design 4
CSC 176 Object Oriented Programming 3
CSC 275 Data Structures and Algorithms 3
CSC 276 Object-Oriented Software Design 3
CSC 346 Software Operating Environments 3
CSC or MIS elective 3
MIS 201 Intro Mgmt Info Systems 3
MIS 375 Applied Systems Analysis 3
MIS 460 Managing Systems Projects 3
MIS 480 Database Management Systems 3
MIS 499 Independ Study in Info Systems (Honors) or CSC 496 Senior Software Engineering Project3
Major SupportHours
MTH 120 Mathematics for Business Majors 3
CSC 281 Discrete Mathematics 3
Foreign Language (intermediate or advanced level recommended) 6
Minor in another discipline 15-21

Typical Program for B.S. Software Applications and Systems Development

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
CSC 1754 CSC 1763
MIS 2013 Elective3
WRT 1013 Elective3
MTH 120/ MTH 1223 PHL 1103
COR 1003 HST 1113
Sophomore Year
CSC 2753 CSC 276 or CSC 3463
MIS 3753 EAC3
EAC3 Social Science3
HST 1103 PHL 2103
CSC 2813 ENG 2103
Junior Year
MIS 4603 CSC 346 or CSC 2763
CSC/MIS elective3 MIS 4803
Elective3 Elective3
CSC 3753 Elective3
Theology3 ENG 3103
Senior Year
MIS 499 or CSC 4963 Elective3
Natural Science w/ Lab4 Natural Science w/ Lab4
Elective3 Elective3
IDS3 COR 400A3
VPA3 Religion3

Typical Program for B.A. Software Applications and Systems Development

First SemesterHoursSecond SemesterHours
Freshman Year
CSC 1754 CSC 1763
MIS 2013 Elective3
MTH 120 or MTH 1223 Elective3
WRT 1013 PHL 1103
COR 1003 HST 1113
Sophomore Year
CSC 2753 CSC 276 or CSC 3463
MIS 3753 Social Science3
EAC3 EAC3
CSC 2813 PHL 2103
HST 1103 ENG 2103
Junior Year
MIS 4603 CSC 276 or CSC 3463
CSC or MIS elective3 MIS 4803
Elective3 Elective3
Natural Science3 Elective3
Theology3 ENG 3103
Senior Year
MIS 499 or CSC 4963 Elective3
CSC Elective3 Elective3
Elective3 Elective3
IDS3 COR 400A3
VPA1 Religion3

Courses


CSC 151 . Intro Information Processing (3).

An overview of past, present and future computing and its applications in the business setting. Topics include a brief history of modern computers and computer languages, an introduction to the hardware components of computer systems and their functions, information storage and organization, data communications and networks, and system and application software. Special features of microcomputer hardware and software will be considered. The course will include introductory concepts and applications of electronic spreadsheets, with practical experience in using standard spreadsheet software. No prerequisites.

CSC 175 (MIS 175). Introduction to Algorithms and Program Design (4).

This course introduces students to programming with an emphasis on computational problem-solving. Topics include program design and testing strategies, programming language syntax and semantics, scalar data types and an introduction to data structures, control structures, iteration, recursion, file input/output, exceptions as well as an introduction to algorithm analysis. Students will use a high-level programming lanugage to develop programs and reinforce their understanding of topics.

CSC 175L (MIS 175L). Lab ().

CSC 176 . Object Oriented Programming (3).

This course continues the study of program development introduced in CSC 175. Topics include intermediate program design, object oriented programming (objects, types, inheritance, and polymorphism), basic data structures such as arrays and strings, and event-driven programming using a graphical user interface (GUI). Students will use a high-level programming language to complete several intermediate sized programming projects to reinforce concepts. Prerequisites: CSC 171 or CSC 175.

CSC 181 . Bits, Nibbles, and Bytes (3).

This course provides an introduction to computer hardware with an emphasis on architecture and low-level programming. Topics include Boolean logic, design of combinational and sequential circuits, design of computer hardware components such as the CPU, machine level representation of data, and basic machine architecture. Assembly language is used to provide a programming experience where the code directly manipulates the CPU and memory.

CSC 203 (MIS 326). COBOL Programming (3).

This course is a study of the COBOL programming language, with application of its features for table handling, sorting, sequential and random access file handling and modular programming. Prerequisite: prior experience with a high-level programming language.

CSC 241 . Transition to Java (1).

This course leverages a students' existing programming langugae knowledge to learn the Jave programming langugae. The programming language (PL) used in CSC 171 and CSC 172 is used to connect a students' existing PL knowledge to learning Java. After discussing the similarities and differences in syntax and semantics, emphasis is on having students learn how to use the Java API and its web-based documentation, the Java data structures and how they relate to the data structures covered in CSC 172, and the Java user interface.

CSC 252 (MIS 385/MIS 785). Developing Decision Support Applications With Visual Basic (3).

This class covers the basics of structured programming using Visual Basic to develop decision support systems or management science applications. The theory and practice of structured programming, logic, systems development are covered in a series of iterative hands-on assignments, which are designed based on practical decision support systems or management science applications. Students can expect to learn how to create and program advanced Excel applications or other equivalent applications. A term project involving the development and documentation of a Visual basic program is required. Prerequisite: MIS 201, MIS 501, or permission of the instructor.

CSC 253 (MIS 325). Programming With Java (3).

Java is a highly portable object-oriented programming language suitable for developing both Internet and stand alone applications. Its integrated support for threads also makes it suitable for developing concurrent and distributed applications. This course covers the specifics of writing programs in Java, as well as some basics of object-oriented design and programming. It will also touch on graphical user interfaces and threads, with additional topics as time permits. Students will apply the learned concepts to develop business computer applications using the Java programming language, and to enhance the quality of the applications, such as program readability, style, testing and documentation. Prerequisites: MIS 201 or permission of the instructor.

CSC 275 . Data Structures and Algorithms (3).

This course studies data structures and algorithm analysis. Topics include data structures such as list, trees, stacks, queues, heaps, hash tables and graphs, and algorithms for searching and sorting, and simple graph algorithms. Students will also learn how to formally analyze algorithms. The emphasis will be on applying data structures to design and implement efficient algorithms. Students will use a high-level programming language to complete several intermediate sized programming projects to reinforce concepts. Prerequisites: CSC 176. Co-requisites: CSC 281.

CSC 276 . Object-Oriented Software Design (3).

This course deals with the general topic of object-oriented software design. Design strategies (e.g., compositional) and concepts (e.g., functional independence) are discussed in the context of a software design model that contains four elements- architecture, data, interfaces, and components. Different object-oriented software design techniques (e.g., UML), software design metrics (e.g., coupling), and software quality assurance techniques (e.g., review) are discussed and applied to software designs. The course will also introduce human-computer interaction, information models and database systems. Each students will produce small and medium-sized design models and will produce one medium-sized design model and a prototype implementation. Prerequisite: CSC 176 or permission of the program director.

CSC 281 (MTH 260). Discrete Mathematics (3).

This course covers the fundamental mathematical principles relevant to computer science, applied mathematics, and engineering. Topics included are functions, relations, sets, propositional logic, predicate logic, proof techniques, (with an emphasis on mathematical induction), basics of counting, and discrete probability. Corequisite: CSC 275 (for CS majors). No co-requisite for non-CS majors.

CSC 346 . Software Operating Environments (3).

This course covers operating system principles and design, and focuses on process management, memory management, and device and file management. Performance considerations, including both resource usage and speed, are emphasized. Students will develop design models that describe the functional components of operating systems, and will develop/modify software that simulates selected components of an operating system. (Offered every other spring.)

CSC 355 . Programming Languages & Paradigms (3).

This course introduces the theory of programming languages and at least two computing paradigms-functional and logic. Theory topics include syntax, semantics, type systems, program representation, language translation and execution, and memory management. At least one functional and one logic language will be covered, giving students hands-on experience using these paradigms. Choice of programming language and its impact on security will also be discussed. Prerequisite: CSC 176.

CSC 361 . Cybersecurity for Future Presidents (3).

Future Presidents will need to understand the science, technology, and human considerations behind cyber security well enough to make informed decisions when provided advice and options for action. By adopting the perspective of training future Presidents, this course aims to help all students (whether or not they later seek leadership positions in government or industry) to understand cyber security, privacy, and intellectual property issues from technical and social perspectives. It assumes a basic familiarity with computers including use of modern desktop, mobile and web-based platforms. It is designed for students who have an interest in thinking critically about how technology and cyber security may affect individuals, group, and organizations in 20-30 years. Government by the people dependson a citizenry that understands the issues their leaders must address. This course will provide students the tools to understand and evaluate the actions of future leaders in the area of cyber security.

CSC 375 . Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3).

This course covers at least four major algorithm design techniques: greedy, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming and network flow algorithms while emphasizing techniques for analyzing algorithms. Designing and analyzing algorithms for parallel machines will also be discussed. Additional topics include computational complexity focusing on NP-completeness, and some algorithmic techniques for dealing with intractable problems including approximation algorithms and local search. Prerequisites: CSC 275 and CSC 281.

CSC 376 . Software Engineering (3).

This course introduces techniques for specifying, designing, and building reliable software systems. Topics include requirements gathering and analysis, software design and construction processes, testing and software reliabitiy issues, and software evolution. Additional topics covered include professionalism, project management, and a variety of tools and environments for software engineering. Students will participate in a team to develop a small software application. Prerequisites: CSC 276 or permission of the instructor.

CSC 385 . Consulting (1).

This course is a program of informal instruction in the total environment of the College’s academic computer system hardware, operating system, system utilities, compilers, run-time systems, software packages and in the application of the student’s consequent knowledge to assisting other students, as well as faculty members, in their use of this computer system. To be taken on a pass/fail basis only. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and permission of the department chair.

CSC 390 . Independent Study (3).

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration, a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure and number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair and the academic dean. The proposal will be kept on file in the academic dean's office.

CSC 411 . Introduction of Artificial Intelligence (3).

This course introduces the concepts and uses of artifical intelligence. Topics include heuristic search techniques, branch and bound, game-playing, neural nets, knowledge representation, logic and deduction, planning and an introduction to machine learning. Prerequisites: CSC 275.

CSC 441 . Secure Software Development in Mobile And Cloud Environments (3).

This course introduces secured software development in two environments - mobile and cloud - with an emphasis on design, construction and testing. The course will also reinforce human-computer interaction, information models and database systems. Each student will produce design models and at least one prototype implementation. Prerequisites: CSC 275.

CSC 445 . Networks and Secure Software Development (3).

This course covers net-centric computing by focusing on client-server computing and the Internet protocol stack. Existing application layer protocols (e.g., FTP, HTTP, and SMTP) and transport layer protocols (TCP, UDP) are used to discuss networking technologies and security implications for distributing software components on a network. Students will produce design models of distributed computing applications-with an emphasis on application layer protocols, security, and client-server architecture-and will construct prototype implementations for many of these designs. Students will also reinforce their understanding of information models and database systems, and be introduced to other models of distributed computing (e.g., peer-to-peer, distributed data). Prerequisites: CSC 275 or permission of the instructor.

CSC 460 (MIS 460/MGT 460/MIS 711/NSG 611). Managing Systems Project (3).

This course focuses on introductory project management processes, technology and tools, utilizing the Project Management Institute's (PMI) Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) and the Software Engineering Institute's (SEI's) Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) processes and nomenclature. Students examine the processes and theory of project management as well as industry case studies, and will utilize project management software in support of their management activities. Guest speakers and field research provide students with access and information from industry and academia. Students are engaged in a semester-long project. Initially, they are required to identify the project scope and team charter for their project; subsequent assignments require them to prepare a business case, work breakdown structure, cost estimate, and final project documentation for their project. Students document their projects as described above, and present the results of their analysis and management activities to their peers and the Project Management Advisory Board.

CSC 471 . Models of Computation (3).

While most computer science courses discuss problems which are able to be solved by computers, this course will look at both the capabilities and the limitations of computers. We start by analyzing simple models of computation, including finite state automata, and push down automata, and build up to Turing machines, which are powerful enough to model modern computers including multicore parallel machines. The course explores where the boundary lies between what is possible and impossible to compute on each model to draw conclusions about the nature of computation. Prerequisites: CSC 275.

CSC 480 (MIS 480). Database Management Systems (3).

This course provides an overview of the concepts and principles of database management systems, blending technical with managerial topics. Students will study the principles of database structures, the database development process, entity-relationship and object-oriented database models, logical and physical database designs, SQL, as well as distributed and object-oriented databases. Students will also examine data warehouses, as well as the challenges of global electronic data management, electronic commerce and ethical issues associated with the increasing integration and complexity of large-scale data sets. Students will complete a database design project during the semester. Prerequisites: CSC 275 or permission of the instructor.

CSC 481 . Database Theory (1).

This course introduces students to the theory behind database technologies. Student's knowledge of SQL will be used to discuss relational algebra, relational calculus, normalization, and functional dependencies. Indexing structures(e.g., b-tree, hashing) and their associated performace characteristics and transaction processing (i.e., commits and concurrency issues) will also be discussed. A student must concurrently take CSC 480(MIS 480).

CSC 481-489 . Speical Topics in Computer Science (3).

Courses in this series offer an in-depth exploration of specific issues within computer science, as well as topics of current interest to instructors or students. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor.

CSC 490 . Internship in Computer Science (1-6).

Participation in a field learning experience in some area of computer science. The student intern reports as required to a supervising faculty member, who will evaluate the internship and its relationship to the student's academic program. Prerequisites: a minimum of four computer science courses; junior or senior standing; and approval of the department. May be taken pass/fail only.

CSC 495 . Senior Research Project (3).

This course, exclusively for senior computer science majors, involves the completion and presentation of a research project in a computer science topic of interest to the student. This research is typically done by students individually and results in a paper, presentation materials, and optionally a prototype implementation. Prerequisite: Senior status, computer science major or permission of the program director.

CSC 496 . Senior Software Engineering Project (3).

This course, exclusively for senior computer science majors, involves the completion and presentation of a software engineering project while working in a team environment. This software engineering project is typically done with a team of students and results in software engineering artifacts, presentation materials, and a prototype implementation. Prerequisites: Senior status, computer science major or permission of the program director.

MTH 007 . Intermediate Algebra (0).

A non-credit, pre-college course in intermediate algebra stressing graphing and equation solving, algebraic manipulation, laws of exponents functions, and logarithms.

MTH 090 . Precalculus (0).

A non-credit, pre-college course in algebra and trigonometry, covering functions (including exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions), analytic trigonometry, linear algebra (including system of equations, matrices, and determinants) and analytic geometry. Prerequisite: Three years of high school mathematics. This course does not satisfy the core mathematics requirement.

MTH 102 . Mathematics for Educators (3).

A problem-solving oriented course for prospective elementary school teachers. Topics will include some of the following: properties of number systems, place value and scales of notation, elementary number theory, geometry and measurement, statistics probability. Open only to students in the Elementary Education program. Prerequisite: Three units of high-school mathematics or MTH 007. Offered each Fall.

MTH 103 . Elections, Voting and Mathematics (3).

This course focuses on three main topics relating math and politics. Polling is a tool ubiquitous in politics. We will determine what makes a good poll, and how much information one can actually infer from a poll. From there we will study the many, and sometimes apparently contradictory, statistical claims made by candidates, ads, and pundits in order to advance their positions. By using mathematical reasoning we will determine what truth lies behind these claims. Finally, we will look at voting to see how much your vote actually counts. We will also compare our (US) voting systems to others around the world, and try to understand what makes a voting system "fair."

MTH 104 . Mathematics for Decision Making (3).

We all need to make decisions. As citizens, we need to sift through the mountain of (often misleading) data that is constantly being thrown our way by advertisers, the media, politicians, etc. As professionals, we may need to make decisions using data from such diverse areas as economics, social policy, health care, the military, or the environment. In any role, we need to know how data can be turned into useful information. This course covers mathematics used to analyze data in order to make good, informed decisions. Major topics include informal logic, data interpretations, basic probability, introductory statistics, and economics.

MTH 110 . Introduction to Statistics I (no Computer Lab) (3).

A data-oriented, applied introduction to statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, data distributions, random sampling, relationships, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Statistical software will be used throughout this course. Prerequisite: Three years of regents- level mathematics. Students may not take both MTH 110 and MTH 111.

MTH 111 . Introduction to Statistics I (with Computer Lab) (4).

A data oriented, applied introduction to statistics; includes a two hour per week computer lab. Topics include descriptive statistics, data distributions, random sampling, relationships, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Statistical software will be used throughout this course. Prerequisite:Three years of Regents-level mathematics. Students may not take both MTH 110 and MTH 111.

MTH 112 . Introduction to Statistics II (3).

This course is a continuation of MTH 110 and MTH 111. Further methods of statistics and their use in life will be covered. It includes: inference for one and two population means, inference for two proportions and two variances, inference for simple and multiple regression, categorical data analysis, analysis of variance, nonparametric tests and logistic regression. A statistical program will be used throughout this course. Prerequisites: MTH 110,111 or equivalent.

MTH 120 . Mathematics for Business Majors (3).

This course includes the following topics: exponential functions and models, mathematics of finance, linear systems and matrices, linear programming, derivatives. There is particular emphasis on applied problems. Prerequisite: three units of high-school mathematics or MTH 007. Students may not take both MTH 120 and MTH 123.

MTH 122 . Brief Calculus (3).

Elementary functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, continuity, derivatives, max-min methods and applications. Primarily for students in economics and accounting. Prerequisite: three units of high-school mathematics including intermediate algebra.

MTH 123 . Mathematics for Act Majors (3).

An introduction to various contemporary applications of mathematics drawn from the following topics: linear algebra, combinatorics, graph theory, probability, modern algebra. The emphasis is on the interplay between theory and application in mathematics. Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics. Students may not take both MTH 120 and MTH 123.

MTH 145 . Calculus I (4).

A study of differential and integral calculus of one variable and applications. Prerequisite: four units of high-school mathematics or permission of the department chair.

MTH 146 . Calculus II (4).

A study of differential and integral calculus of one and several variables and applications. Differential equations and their solutions. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MTH 145 or permission of the department chair.

MTH 245 . Calculus III (4).

Multi-variate calculus with vectors. Line integrals and Green's theorem. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in MTH 146 or permission of the department chair.

MTH 260 (CSC 281). Discrete Mathematics (3).

This course covers the fundamental mathematical principles relevant to computer science, applied mathematics, and engineering. Topics included are functions, relations, sets, propositional logic, predicate logic, proof techniques, mathematical induction and recursion, graphs, trees, and probability. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MTH 145, or permission of the department chair.

MTH 261 . Linear Algebra (3).

Systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, vectors and vector spaces, linear transformations, inner product spaces, determinants, characteristic values and vectors. Prerequisites: MTH 145, MTH 146(grade of C- or better), or permission of the department chair. (Offered each Fall) Students will not be able to get credit for both MTH 261 and MTH 304.

MTH 303 . Differential Equations and Mathematical Modeling (3).

Differential equations play a vital role in modeling nearly every physical, chemical, and biological process. Understanding how to create and interpret mathematical models, as well as how to solve and characterize solutions of differential equations, is of fundamental importance to applied mathematics, contemporary science, and engineering. This course provides a first introduction to this ubiquitous field of analysis with a heavy emphasis on the development, refinement, and interpretation of mathematical models using differential equations. The first portion of the course examines the various analytical, qualitative and numerical techniques available for analyzing the solutions of linear and nonlinear first-order differential equations (topics include separable equations, linear equations, transformation of variables, series methods, integral transforms, slope fields, equilibria, Euler's Method, and bifurcations). The second portion of the course focuses on techniques for studying systems of first-order differential equations (topics include direction fields, phase planes, Euler's Method for systems, homogeneous and nonhomogeneous linear systems, and the linearization of nonlinear systems). Prerequisite: MTH 146 (grade of C- or better) or permission of the department chair. Students will not be able to get credit for both MTH 303 and MTH 304.

MTH 304 . Differential Equations for Scientists And Engineers (4).

Primarily intended for physics and pre-engineering majors, this course integrates the study of linear algebra and differential equations with substantial emphasis placed on understanding the deep connections between these foundational fields of study. Linear algebra topics covered in this course include Gauss-Jordan elimination, matrix algebra, inverse matrices, determinants, eigenvalues/eigenvectors, linear transformations, vector spaces, linear independence, span, basis and dimension. Differential equations topics covered in this course include separable equations, linear equations, transformation of variables, series methods, integral transforms, slope fields, Euler's Method, homogeneous and nonhomogeneous linear systems, and basic solution techniques for solving partial differential equations. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MTH 245. Students will not be able to get credit for both MTH 261 and MTH 304, or for both MTH 303 and MTH 304.

MTH 306 . Topics in Number Theory (3).

Elementary properties of integers, divisibility and related concepts, methods of representing integers, functions of number theory, simple diophantine equations, special sequences and series. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MTH 260 or MTH 261 or permission of the department chair. Offered every other fall.

MTH 307 . Combinatorial Mathematics and Graph Theory (3).

Some classical puzzles of recreational mathematics; enumeration techniques; combinatorial designs; graph theory and network flows. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in either MTH 260 or MTH 261, or permission of the department chair.

MTH 311 . Introduction to Probability Theory (3).

Basic probability theory, combinatorial analysis, independence and dependence. Discrete and continuous distributions, random variables, random vectors, multivariate distributions. Expectations and moment generating functions. Binomial, normal, Poisson and related distributions. Sums and sequences of random variables. Central limit theorem. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MTH 245 or permission of the department chair. (Offered each fall.)

MTH 312 . Mathematical Statistics (3).

Distributions related to the normal. Estimation: consistency, unbiasedness, mean square error, sufficiency, method of moments, maximum likelihood estimates, confidence limits and intervals. Bayesian intervals. Tests of hypotheses: tests of simple hypotheses, Neyman-Pearson lemma, Bayes procedures, composite hypotheses, generalized likelihood ratio tests. Non-parametric procedures. Simple linear regression. Prerequisite: MTH 311. (Offered every other spring.)

MTH 313 . Applied Statistics (3).

Review of statistical methods. Simple and multiple linear regression. Regression diagnostics. Time series models. Moving average, autoregressive and ARIMA models. Forecasting with regression and time series models. Prerequisites: MTH 311. (Offered every other spring.)

MTH 314 . Actuarial Probability (1).

This is a course designed to prepare students to pass the actuary exam P. This course covers actuarial applications of set theory, combinatorial probability, Bayes theorem, probability density functions, joint probability functions, and marginal and conditional probability. It also introduces several advanced topics, including transformations, order statistics, and a number of named distributions not covered in Math 311. Prerequisites: C- or better in MTH 311.

MTH 332 . Real Analysis (4).

An introduction to techniques of mathematical proof, with emphasis on the recognition and evalution of problem structures common to all areas of mathematics. Application of these techniques to a detailed description of the Real Number system. Examination of the algebraic, set-theoretic and topological structures of the Real Number system (completeness, compactness, connectedness) and real sequences. Prerequisites: Grades of C- or better in MTH 245, or permission of the department chair. (Offered each spring.)

MTH 341 . Abstract Algebra (3).

Introduction to group theory. Cyclic, Abelian, symmetric and product groups. Subgroups, equivalence relations, homomorphisms. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MTH 261 or permission of the department chair. (Offered each fall.)

MTH 361 . Modern Geometry (3).

Topics from the foundations of geometry, non-Euclidean geometry, transformation theory, dissection theory, convexity. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MTH 261 or permission of the department chair. (Offered every spring.)

MTH 370 . Intermediate Problem Solving (3).

A working introduction to general heuristic reasoning (including specialization, generalization, analogy and induction) useful in solving mathematical problems. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MTH 245 or permission of the department chair. (Offered every spring.)

MTH 390 . Independent Study (1-3).

A student who wishes to pursue an independent study project for academic credit must submit, prior to registration, a proposed plan of study that includes the topic to be studied and goal to be achieved, the methodology to be followed, schedule of supervision, end product, evaluation procedure and number of credits sought. The proposal must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the department chair and the dean of arts and sciences.

MTH 421 . Numerical Methods (3).

The development of algorithms for and error analysis of: solutions of equations, interpolation and approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solutions of differential equations. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in MTH 245 and MTH 261 or permission of the department chair. Also, knowledge of a high level programming language. (Offered every other fall.)

MTH 431 . Introduction to Complex Analysis (3).

The complex number system. Differentiability and the Cauchy-Riemann conditions. The exponential, trigonometric and logarithm functions. Complex integration; the Cauchy integral theorem and its implications. Consequences of the Cauchy integral formula. Taylor and Laurent series, singularities. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MTH 245, or permission of the department chair.

MTH 470-479 . Topics in Mathematics (3).

These courses will vary in content and will be offered irregularly depending on student interest and faculty availability.

MTH 481 . Topology (3).

Topological spaces; separation and countability properties. Mappings and continuity. Compactness and connectedness of various types. Product and quotient spaces. Prerequisite: MTH 332 or permission of the department chair.

MTH 490 . Internship (1-6).

A limited number of internships are available to students to provide them with practical experience in the applications of mathematics in business. Prerequisites: Senior standing in mathematics and prior consultation with department chair.

MTH 494 . Preparation for Mathematical Research (1).

This course is designed solely for Mathematics majors with an aim of making students understand, annotate and communicate (both verbally and in writeen form) the contents of a mathematical/statistical article. Also discussed will be the basics of the scientific document preparation system LaTeX.

MTH 495 . Senior Research Project (3).

This course, exclusively for senior mathematics majors, involves the completion and presentation of a research project in the student's area of concentration. Prior to registration for the course, a student must submit a proposal and have it approved by the department chair. Students may work in teams of two or three on projects; however, team projects will require commensurably greater scope than individual projects.

MTH 496-499 . Research (3).

An upper-class student who wishes to undertake a research project for academic credit during a given semester must submit a research proposal prior to registration and a research report at the end of the semester. The proposal, indicating the number of credits sought, must be approved by the research director, the department chair and the academic dean. It will be kept on file in the deans’ office.

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